Skip to main content

Full text of "Catalog, 1948-49"

See other formats


■ M'milM* 



EASTERN KENTUCKY 
STATE COLLEGE 




EASTERN KENTUCKY REVIEW 

Richmond^ Kentucky 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Page 

College Calendar 5 

Administration and Faculty 9 

General Information 27 

Extension Division 45 

Admission Requirements 48 

Expenses 53 

Degrees 56 

Graduate Division 67 

Courses of Instruction and Curricula 71 

Index 171 





1 948 




JANUARY 


FEBRUARY 


MARCH 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


1 2 3 


12 3 4 5 6 7 


.... 12 3 4 5 6 


4 5 6 7 8 9 10 


8 9 10 11 12 13 14 


7 8 9 10 11 12 13 


11 12 13 14 15 16 17 


15 16 17 18 19 20 21 


14 15 16 17 18 19 20 


18 19 20 21 22 23 24 


22 23 24 25 26 27 28 


21 22 23 24 25 26 27 


25 26 27 28 29 30 31 


29 


28 29 30 31 


APRIL, 


MAY 


JUNE 


12 3 


1 


12 3 4 5 


4 5 6 7 8 9 10 


2 3 4 5 6 7 8 


6 7 8 9 10 11 12 


11 12 13 14 15 16 17 


9 10 11 12 13 14 15 


13 14 15 16 17 18 19 


18 19 20 21 22 23 24 


16 17 18 19 20 21 22 


20 21 22 23 24 25 26 


25 26 27 28 29 30 .... 


23 24 25 26 27 28 29 

30 31 

AUGUST 


27 28 29 30 


JULY 


SEPTEMBER 


1 2 3 


12 3 4 5 6 7 


12 3 4 


4 5 6 7 8 9 10 


8 9 10 11 12 13 14 


5 6 7 8 9 10 11 


11 12 13 14 15 16 17 


15 16 17 18 19 20 21 


12 13 14 15 16 17 18 


18 19 20 21 22 23 24 


22 23 24 25 26 27 28 


19 20 21 22 23 24 25 


25 26 27 28 29 30 31 


29 30 31 


26 27 28 29 30 


OCTOBER 


NOVEMBER 


DECEMBER 


1 2 


.... 12 3 4 5 6 


12 3 4 


3 4 5 6 7 8 9 


7 8 9 10 11 12 13 


5 6 7 8 9 10 11 


10 11 12 13 14 15 16 


14 15 16 17 18 19 20 


12 13 14 15 16 17 18 


17 18 19 20 21 22 23 


21 22 23 24 25 26 27 


19 20 21 22 23 24 25 


24 25 26 27 28 29 30 
31 


28 29 30 


26 27 28 29 30 31 .... 





1 949 




JANUARY 


FEBRUARY 


MARCH 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


1 


12 3 4 5 


12 3 4 5 


2 3 4 5 6 7 8 


6 7 8 9 10 11 12 


6 7 8 9 10 11 12 


9 10 11 12 13 14 15 


13 14 15 16 17 18 19 


13 14 15 16 17 18 19 


16 17 18 19 20 21 22 


20 21 22 23 24 25 26 


20 21 22 23 24 25 26 


23 24 25 26 27 28 29 


27 28 


27 28 29 20 31 


30 31 

APRIL 






MAY 


JUNE 


1 2 


12 3 4 5 6 7 


12 3 4 


3 4 5 6 7 8 9 


8 9 10 11 12 13 14 


5 6 7 8 9 10 11 


10 11 12 13 14 15 16 


15 16 17 18 19 20 21 


12 13 14 15 16 17 18 


17 18 19 20 21 22 23 


22 23 24 25 26 27 28 


19 20 21 22 23 24 25 


24 25 26 27 28 29 30 


29 30 31 


26 27 28 29 30 


JULY 


AUGUST 


SEPTEMBER 


1 2 


.... 12 3 4 5 6 


1 2 3 


3 4 5 6 7 8 9 


7 8 9 10 11 12 13 


4 5 6 7 8 9 10 


10 11 12 13 14 15 16 


14 15 16 17 18 19 20 


11 12 13 14 15 16 17 


17 18 19 20 21 22 23 


21 22 23 24 25 26 27 


18 19 20 21 22 23 24 


24 25 26 27 28 29 30 
31 

OCTOBER 


28 29 30 31 


25 26 27 28 29 30 .... 


NOVEMBER 


DECEMBER 


1 


12 3 4 5 


1 2 3 


2 3 4 5 6 7 8 


6 7 8 9 10 11 12 


4 5 6 7 8 9 10 


9 10 11 12 13 14 15 


13 14 15 16 17 18 19 


11 12 13 14 15 16 17 


16 17 18 19 20 21 22 


20 21 22 23 24 25 26 


18 19 20 21 22 23 24 


23 24 25 26 27 28 29 


27 28 29 30 


25 26 27 28 29 30 31 


30 31 







1948— CALENDAR— 1949 



September 15 Wednesday 
September 16 Thursday 



September 17 
September 18 
September 20 
September 27 



Priday 
Saturday 
Monday 
Monday 



October 25 Monday 



November 17 
November 24 



Wednesday 
Wednesday 



November 29 Monday 
December 18 Saturday 
January 3 Monday 

January 27 Thursday 
January 28 Friday 



January 31 
February 1 
February 2 
February 8 

March 7 



April 4 
April 14, 
May 29 
June 1 
June 2 



June 6 
June 7 
June 9 

June 20 

July 29 



15, 



Monday 
Tuesday 
Wednesday 
Tuesday 

Monday 

Monday 
16, Thursday 
Sunday 
Wednesday 
Thursday 



FIRST SEMESTER 

8:30 a.m. Classification tests for first semester 

freshmen 
8:30 a.m. Classification tests for first semester 

freshmen 
8:00 a.m. Registration of freshmen 
8:00 a.m. Registration of upperclass students 
Classes begin 
Last day to enter a course for credit 

with a reduced load 
Last day on which a course may be 

dropped without a grade 
10:00 a.m. Mid-semester reports to Registrar 
5:00 p.m. School closes for Thanksgiving 

Holiday 
8:00 a.m. Class work resumed 
Noon Christmas Holiday begins 

8:00 a.m. Class work resumed 
5:00 p. m. First semester closes 
Noon Grades to Registrar 

SECOND SEMESTER 

8:00 a.m. Registration 
8:00 a.m. Registration 

Classes begin 

Last day to enter a class for credit 
with a reduced load 

Last day on which a course may be 
dropped without a grade 
9:00 a.m. Mid-semester reports to Registrar 
Friday, Saturday, KEA, Spring Vacation 

Baccalaureate 

Commencement 
5:00 p. m. Second semester ends 



SUMMER SCHOOL— 1949 

Monday 8:00 a.m. Summer School begins 

Tuesday Last day to register for full load 

Thursday Last day to enter a course for credit 

with a reduced load 
Monday Last day on which a course may be 

dropped without a grade 
Friday 5:00 p.m. Summer School ends 




ADMINISTRATION BUILDING 



OFFICIAL DIRECTORY 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2011 with funding from 

LYRASIS Members and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/catalog19484939east 



BOARD OF REGENTS 

BOSWELL B. HODGKIN 
State Superintendent of Public Instruction, ex officio Chairman 

J. C. CODELL, Winchester, Kentucky 
EVERETT J. EVANS, Paintsville, Kentucky 

O. F. HUME, Richmond, Kentucky 
H. CLAY KAUFFMAN, Lancaster, Kentucky 



OFFICERS OF THE BOARD 

BOSWELL B. HODGKIN, Chairman 

O. F. HUME, Vice-Chairman 

L. KATHERINE MORGAN, Secretary 

PAUL BURNAM, Treasurer 

O. F. HUME, Representative of Board of Regents on Council 
on Public Higher Education 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

O. F. HUME, Chairman 

EVERETT J. EVANS 

H. CLAY KAUFFMAN 

W. F. O'DONNELL 



ADMINISTRATION 

W. F. O'DONNELL, A. B., M. A., LL. D President 

WILLIAM J. MOORE, A. B., A. M., Ph. D Dean 

G. M. BROCK Business Agent 

D. J. CARTY, B. S., A. M Director of Public Relations 

MRS. EMMA YOUNG CASE, A. B., M. A Dean of Women 

J. DORLAND COATES, B. S., M. A., Ph. D. Principal of the 

Model High School 

NOEL B. CUFF, B. S., A. M., Ph. D Director of Personnel 

RICHARD A. EDWARDS, A. B., A. M Principal of the Elementary 

Training Schools 

MARY FLOYD, A. B., M. A., B. S. in Library Science Librarian 

CHARLES A. KEITH, B. A., M. A., Ped. D Dean of Men 

MELVIN E. MATTOX, B. S., M. A Registrar 



FACULTY 

W. F. O'DONNELL, A. B., M. A., LL. D. President 

A. B., Transylvania College; M. A., Teachers College, Colvimbia 
University; LL. D., Transylvania College. 

KERNEY M. ADAMS, A. B., A. M. Professor of History 

Diploma, Eastern Kentucky State Normal School; A. B., Uni- 
versity of Kentucky; A. M., Cornell University; additional graduate 
work, Harvard University. 

ANNIE ALVIS, A. B., M. A. Assistant Professor of Elementary 

Education; Supervising Teacher, 
Elementary Training School 

A. B., State Teachers College, Farmville, Virginia; M. A., 
Teachers College, Columbia University; graduate student. Uni- 
versity of Chicago. 

DAVID BARNES, B. S., M. S. Instructor of Industrial Arts 

B. S., Eastern Kentucky State Teachers College; M. S., Purdue 
University. 

MRS. MARY EDMUNDS BARNHILL, A. B., M. A., LL. B. 

Associate Professor of English 
Diploma, Western Kentucky State Normal School; A. B., Uni- 
versity of Kentucky; M. A., Ohio State University; LL. B., Uni- 
versity of Louisville; additional graduate work, Ohio State Uni- 
versity. 

J. G. BLACK, B. S., M. S., Ph. D. Professor of Physics 

B. S., M. S., University of Kentucky; Ph. D., University of 
Michigan. 

HARVEY BLANTON, B. S.. M. D. CoUege Physician 

B. S., Eastern Kentucky Stat^ Teachers College; M. D., Uni- 
versity of Louisville. 

C. E. BRANSCOME, A. B., M. A. Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

A. B., William and Mary; M. A., George Peabody College for 
Teachers; additional graduate work, George Peabody College for 
Teachers. 

*G. O. BRYANT, A. B., A. M. Assistant Professor of Mathematics; 

Supervising Teacher, Model High School 
Diploma, Western Kentucky State Normal School; A. B., A. M., 
University of Kentucky. 



•Retired June 30. 1942. 



12 EASTERN STATE COLLEGE 

PEARL L. BUCHANAN, A. B., M. A. Associate Professor of English 

A. B., Southwestern University; graduate student, University 
of Oklahoma and Northwestern University; M. A., George Peabody 
College for Teachers. 

VIRGIL BURNS, A. B., M. A. Associate Professor of History and Government 

Diploma, Western Kentucky State Normal School; student, 
Bowling Green Business University; A. B., University of Kentucky; 
M. A., Teachers College, Columbia University; additional graduate 
work, Columbia University. 

MARY KING BURRIER, B. S., M. S. Associate Professor of Home Economics 
Diploma, Hamilton College; B. S., M. S., University of Ken- 
tucky; graduate work, Columbia University, and University of 
Chicago. 

JANE CAMPBELL, B. Mus., A. B., A. M. Assistant Professor of Music 

B. Mus., Taylor University; A. B., Eastern Indiana State Nor- 
mal School; graduate work. State Teachers College, Indiana, Pa.; 
A. M., Columbia University; Ecole Normale de Musique, Paris; 
student of Nadia Boulanger. 

ASHBY B. CARTER, B. S., M. A. Associate Professor of Agriculture 

Student, University of Richmond, University of Virginia, and 
Virginia Mechanics Institute; B. S., M. A,, George Peabody College 
for Teachers; graduate work, Columbia University and University 
of Kentucky. 

D. J. CARTY, B. S., A. M. Director of Public Relations 

B. S., Eastern Kentucky State Teachers College; A. M., Univer- 
sity of Cincinnati. 

MRS. EMMA YOUNG CASE, A. B., M. A. Associate Professor of 

Education; Dean of Women 

Student, University of Kentucky; A. B., Eastern Kentucky 
State Teachers College; M. A., George Peabody College for 
Teachers. ., ~ 

ROY B. CLARK, A. B., A. M., Ph. D. Professor of English 

Diploma, Nebraska State Normal School; A. B., University of 
Nebraska; A. M., Ph. D., Columbia University. 

J. DORLAND COATES, B. S., M. A., Ph. D. Professor of Secondary 

Education; Principal of the 
Model High School 

B. S., Eastern Kentucky State Teachers College; M. A., George 
Peabody College for Teachers; Ph. D., Colorado State College of 
Education; post-doctoral work. University of Chicago. 

MRS. HELEN COLEMAN, B. S. Instructor of Home Economics 

B. S., Eastern Kentucky State Teachers College. 



RICHMOND, KENTUCKY 13 

MEREDITH J. COX, B. S., M. A. Professor of Chemistry 

Diploma, Warren Academy; B. S., M. A., George Peabody Col- 
lege for Teachers; additional graduate work, Columbia University, 
University of Wisconsin, and Diike University. 

NOEL B. CUFF, B. S., A. M., Ph. D. Professor of Psychology; 

Director of Personnel 
B. S., A. M., Ph. D., George Peabody College for Teachers; 
post-doctoral work, University of Chicago. 

FRED DARLING, B. S., M. A. Instructor of Health and Physical Education; 

Assistant Football Coach 

B. S., M. A., Eastern Kentucky State Teachers College. 

N. G. DENISTON, B. M. T., B. S., M. S. Associate Professor of Industrial Arts 
B, M. T., Valparaiso University; student, Stout Institute, Mas- 
sachusetts Institute of Technology; B. S., Bradley Polytechnic 
Institute; graduate work, University of Chicago; M. S., Kansas 
State Teachers College of Pittsburg. 

J. T. DORRIS, A. B., A. M., Ph. D. Professor of History and Government 

A. B., Illinois College; A. M., University of Wisconsin; Ph. D., 
University of Illinois. 

**DABNEY B. DOTY, B. S. Instructor of Industrial Arts 

B. S., Eastern Kentucky State Teachers College. 

RICHARD A. EDWARDS, A. B., A. M. Professor of Education; 

Principal of Elementary Training Schools 
A. B., University of Kentucky; A. M., Columbia University. 

FRED A. ENGLE, A. B., A. M., Ph. D. Associate Professor of Education 

Student, Cumberland College, University of Chicago; A. B., 
A. M., Ph. D., University of Kentucky. 

D. THOMAS FERRELL, A. B., M. A., Ph. D. Professor of Education 

A. B., A. M., Duke University; M. A. Teachers College, Colum- 
bia University; one quarter, Trinity College, Dublin, Ireland; 
Ph. D., George Peabody College for Teachers; post-doctoral work. 
University of Chicago. 

MARY FLOYD, A. B., M. A., B. S. in Library Service Associate Professor 

of History; Librarian 
A. B., Eastern Kentucky State Teachers College; M. A., Teach- 
ers College, Columbia University; graduate student, University of 
Chicago; B. S. in Library Service, Columbia University. 

EDITH G. FORD, B. C. S., A. B., A. M. Assistant Professor of Commerce 

Diploma, Louisiana State Normal College; B. C. S., Bowling 
Green Business University; A, B., George Washington University; 
A. M., University of Kentucky; student. University of Paris. 

** On leave. 



14 EASTERN STATE COLLEGE 



ALLIE FOWLER, B. S., M. A. Assistant Professor of Art 

B. S., M. A., George Peabody College for Teachers. 

DWIGHT DEAN GATWOOD, B. S., M. A. Assistant Professor of Art 

B. S., M. A., George Peabody College for Teachers. 

=KMAUDE GIBSON Assistant Professor of Art 

Graduate, Lebanon Normal; two years' course in public school 
art, Teachers College, Miami University; student, New York School 
of Applied Design; Teachers College, Columbia University. 

FREDERIC P. GILES, B. Mus., B. A., M. A., Ph. D. Professor of Art 

B. Mus., Southern Methodist University; B. A., North Texas 
State Teachers College; M. A., Ph. D., George Peabody College for 
Teachers; additional graduate work, American Conservatory of 
Music. 

ANNA D. GILL, B. C. S., A. B., M. A. Assistant Professor of Commerce 

B, C. S., Bowling Green Business University; student, Chicago 
Gregg School, University of Wisconsin, and Western Kentucky 
State Teachers College; A. B., M. A., University of Kentucky; addi- 
tional graduate work, Columbia University. 

JOSEPH D. GRAHAM, A. B., A. M. Instructor of English and Speech 

A. B., University of Michigan; A. M., Teachers College, Colum- 
bia University; additional graduate work, New York University. 

PRESLEY M. GRISE, A. B., M. A., Ph. D. Professor of EngUsb 

A. B., Western Kentucky State Teachers College; M. A., 
George Peabody College for Teachers; Ph. D., University of Ken- 
tucky. 

G. M. GUMBERT, B. S., M. S. Assistant Professor of Agriculture; 

Visual Education 

B. S., M. S., University of Kentucky. 

MAY C. HANSEN, B. S., M. A. Associate Professor of Education 

Diploma, Oshkosh State Teachers College; student, University 
of Chicago and Columbia University; B. S., George Peabody Col- 
lege for Teachers; M. A., Teachers College, Columbia University. 

THOMAS C. HERNDON, B. S., M. A., Ph. D. Professor of Chemistry 

B. S., University of Kentucky; graduate work, University of 
Chicago; M. A., Ph. D., George Peabody College for Teachers. 

ELEANORE ANNE HIRE, B. M., M. M. Instructor of Music 

B. M., M. M., Indiana University. 

GERTRUDE M. HOOD, A. B., A. M. Assistant Professor of Health and 

Physical Education 
A. B., Ohio Wesleyan University; A. M., Columbia University. 



•Retired June 30, 1942. 



RICHMOND, KENTUCKY 15 



WILLIAM B. HOPP, B. S., M. S. Assistant Professor of Biology 

B. S., Indiana State Teachers College; M. S., Purdue University; 
additional graduate work, Purdue University. 

SAUL HOUNCHELL, A. B., M. A., Ph. D. Assistant Professor of English 

A. B., Denison University; M. A., Ph. D., George Peabody 
College for Teachers. 

CHARLES T. HUGHES, A. B., M. A. Associate Professor of 

Physical Education 

Diploma, Morton-Elliott Junior College; A. B., University of 
Kentucky; M. A., University of Michigan. 

MRS. MABEL WALKER JENNINGS, B. S., M. A. Instructor of 

Elementary Education 

B. S., M. A., Eastern Kentucky State College. 

WILLIAM L. KEENE, B. S., M. A. Associate Professor of English 

Diploma, Middle Tennessee State Normal School; B. S., M. A., 
George Peabody College for Teachers; additional graduate work, 
George Peabody College for Teachers. 

CHARLES A. KEITH, B. A., M. A., Ped. D. Professor of History and 

Government; Dean of Men 

Student, University of Arkansas and University of Texas; 

B. A., M. A., Oxford University; Honorary Doctor of Pedagogy, 

Ohio Northern University; additional graduate work, Indiana 

University. 

L. G. KENNAMER, A. B., B. S., M. A., Ph. D. Professor of Geography 

and Geology 
A. B., Simmons University; student, University of Wisconsin, 
Vanderbilt University, and University of Tennessee; B. S., M. A., 
Ph. D., George Peabody College for Teachers. 

H. H, LaFUZE, A. B., M. S., Ph. D. Professor of Biology 

A. B., DePauw University; M. S., Ph. D., State University of 
Iowa; additional graduate work, Northwestern University. 

MRS. JANE OLDHAM LANDER, A. B. Instructor of 

Health and Physical Education 

A. B., University of Kentucky; graduate student, University 
of Michigan. 

CORA LEE, B. S., M. A. Assistant Professor of English; 

Supervising Teacher, Model High School 

B. S., George Peabody College for Teachers; M. A., Teachers 
College, Columbia University; additional graduate work. Univer- 
sity of Chicago. 

CLYDE LEWIS, A. B., M. A. Assistant Professor of History 

A. B., Eastern Kentucky State Teachers College; M. A., Uni- 
versity of Cincinnati. 



16 EASTERN STATE COLLEGE 

PAUL McBRAYER, B. S. Basketball Coach 

B. S., University of Kentucky. 

MARY FRANCES McKINNEY, B. S., M. A. Associate Professor of Geography 
Diploma, Eastern Kentucky State Teachers College; B. S., 
M. A., George Peabody College for Teachers. 

FRANCES MARIE McPHERSON, B. M., M. M. Assistant Professor of Music 

B. M., Lindenwood College; student, Horner Conservatoire; 
M. M., Michigan State College; student, Rudolph Ganz. 

MELVIN E. MATTOX, B. S., M. A. Professor of Education; Registrar 

Diploma, Mississippi State Normal School; B. S., M. A., George 
Peabody College for Teachers; additional graduate work, George 
Peabody College for Teachers and University of Kentucky. 

MARGARET HUME MOBERLY, B. S., M. S. Assistant Professor of Commerce 

B. S., Eastern Kentucky State Teachers College; M. S., Uni- 
versity of Chicago. 

DOROTHY MOORE, B. S. Instructor of Elementary Education, 

Rural Demonstration School 

B. S., Eastern Kentucky State Teachers College. 

WILLIAM J. MOORE, A. B., A. M., Ph. D. Dean of the Faculty; 

Director of Research; 
Professor of Economics 

Diploma, Eastern Kentucky State Normal School; student, Col- 
lege of Law, University of Kentucky; A. B., A. M., Ph. D., Univer- 
sity j3f Kentucky; post-doctoral work. University of Kentucky and 
University of Chicago. 

MRS. JANET MURBACH, A. B., A. M., Docteur de I'universite de 

Toulouse, France. Professor of Romance Languages 

A. B., Oberlin College; student. University of Paris and Uni- 
versity of California; A. M., University of Kentucky; Docteur de 
runiversite, de Toulouse, France. 

MARGARET NEALE, A. B., M. A. Instructor of English; 

Supervising Teacher, Model High School 

A. B., Eastern Kentucky State Teachers College; M. A., George 
Peabody College for Teachers. 

SMITH PARK, B. S., M. S., Ph. D. Professor of Mathematics 

B. S., M. S., Ph. D., University of Kentucky. 

GLENN E. PRESNELL, B. S. , Assistant Football Coach 

B. S., University of Nebraska. 

ELLEN PUGH, A. B., A. M. Assistant Professor of Elementary 

Education; Supervising Teacher, 
Elementary Training School 

A. B., Ohio Wesleyan University; A. M., Ohio State University; 
additional graduate work, Ohio State University and Columbia 
University. 



RICHMOND, KENTUCKY 17 



ALMA BEGENSTEIN, B. S., M. A. Assistant Professor of Home Economics; 

Supervising Teacher, Model High School 
B. S., Eastern Kentucky State Teachers College; M. A., Uni- 
versity of Kentucky. 

R. It. RICHARDS, A. B., M. B. A. Assistant Professor of Commerce 

A. B., Eastern Kentucky State Teachers College; graduate 
student, University of Kentucky; M. B. A., College of Business 
Administration, Boston University; additional graduate work, 
Boston University; student, College of Law, Boston University, 
and University of Southern California. 

HAROLD RIGBY, B. S. Instructor of Music; 

Director of High School Band and Orchestra 

B. S., Eastern Kentucky State Teachers College; graduate 
work. University of Kentucky. 

RUBY RUSH, A. B., A. M. Assistant Professor of Latin; Supervising 

Teacher, Model High School 

Graduate, Virginia Intermont College; A. B., University of 
Kentucky; A. M., Columbia University. 

TOM C. SAMUELS, Ph. C, B. S., M. S. Assistant Professor of Health 

and Physical Education; Head Football Coach 
Ph. C, B. S., University of Michigan; M. S., University of 
Kentucky. 

ANNA A. SCHNIEB, A. B., A. M., Ph. D. Professor of Education 

Diploma, Indiana State Teachers College; student, Indiana 
University; A. B., A. M., Columbia University; additional graduate 
work, Columbia University and University of Chicago; Ph. D., 
University of Vienna; additional work, University of Chicago. 

FRANK E. SCHROETER, B. S. Instructor of Industrial Arts 

B. S., Stout Institute. 

BLANCHE SAMS SEEVERS, B. Mus., A. B., M. Mus. Assistant Professor 

of Music 

B. Mus., A. B., University of Kansas; M. Mus., Northwestern 
University. 

EVELYN SLATER, B. S., M. S. Assistant Professor of Home Economics 

B. S., M. S., University of Kentucky; additional graduate work, 
Columbia University. 

WILLIAM STOCKER, B. S. Instructor of Agriculture 

B. S., Eastern Kentucky State Teachers College; graduate work, 
University of Kentucky. 

THOMAS STONE, Mus. B. Assistant Professor of Music 

Mus. B., Oberlin College; additional work, La Follette School 
of Music, New York, and Cincinnati College of Music. 



18 EASTERN STATE COLLEGE 



VIRGINIA F. STORY, B. S., M. A. Assistant Professor of Elementary 

Education; Supervising Teacher, 
Elementary Training School 

Diploma, Eastern Kentucky State Teachers College; B. S., 
M. A., George Peabody College for Teachers. 

BROWN E. TELFORD, B. S. Assistant Professor of Music; 

Teacher of Piano and Organ 

Diploma, Greenbrier College for Women; student, Cincinnati 
Conservatory of Music, New York School of Music and Arts, New- 
England Conservatory of Music; B. S., Columbia University. 

**LONA LEE TURNER, A. B., M. A. Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

A. B., Eastern Kentucky State Teachers College; M. A., Uni- 
versity of Michigan; additional graduate work, University of 
Chicago. 

MRS. JULIAN TYNG, B. S., M. A. Associate Professor of Education 

Diploma, Eastern Kentucky State Normal School and Teachers 
College; B. S., George Peabody College for Teachers; graduate 
work, George Peabody College for Teachers; M. A., Teachers Col- 
lege, Columbia University. 

JAMES E. VAN PEURSEM, A. B., B. Mus., M. A. Professor of Music 

A. B., Morningside College; B. Mus., Oberlin College; M. A., 
New York University. 

SAMUEL WALKER, A. B., A. M., Ph. D. Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

A. B., Maryville College; A. M., Ph. D., University of Kentucky. 

RALPH W. WHALIN, B. S., M. Ed. Associate Professor of Industrial Arts 

B. S., Western Kentucky State Teachers College; M. Ed,, Uni- 
versity of Missouri; additional graduate work, University of 
Kentucky. 

ARTHUR L. WICKERSHAM, B. S., M. A. Instructor of 

Mathematics; Supervising Teacher, 
Model High School 

B. S., M. A., Eastern Kentucky State Teachers College. 

FRANCES WILLIAMS, A. B., M. A. Instructor of History; 

Supervising Teacher, Model High School 

A. B., Kentucky Wesleyan College; M. A., George Peabody 
College for Teachers. 

ELIZABETH WILSON, B. S., M. A. Assistant Professor of Elementary 

Education; Supervising Teacher, 
Elementary Training School 

Diploma, Martin College; B. S., M. A., George Peabody College 
for Teachers. 

LELAND WILSON, B. S., M. S. Instructor of Science; 

Supervising Teacher, Model High School 

B. S., Eastern Kentucky State Teachers College; M. S., Uni- 
versity of Kentucky. 

** On leave. 



RICHMOND, KENTUCKY 19 



GERMANIA J. WINGO, B. S., M. A. Assistant Professor of Elementary 

Education; Supervising Teacher, 
Elementary Training School 
Diploma, Virginia State Teachers College; diploma in critic 
work, Columbia University; B. S., M. A., Teachers College, Colum- 
bia University; additional graduate work, University of Colorado. 

LIBRARY STAFF 

MARY FLOYD, A. B., M. A., B. S. in Library Service Associate Professor 

of History; Librarian 

A. B., Eastern Kentucky State Teachers College; M. A., Teach- 
ers College, Columbia University; graduate student. University of 
Chicago; B. S. in Library Service, Columbia University. 

MRS. LESTER MILLER, B. S., M. A. Assistant Librarian 

B. S., M. A., George Peabody College for Teachers. 

LOUISE RUTLEDGE, A. B., B. S. in Library Science Assistant Librarian 

A. B., Eastern Kentucky State Teachers College; B. S. in 
Library Science, George Peabody College for Teachers; additional 
graduate work, University of Wisconsin. 

MRS. GUY WHITEHEAD, B. S., B. S, in Library Science 

Assistant Librarian in Charge of Reference Work 

B. S., B. S. in Library Science, George Peabody College for 
Teachers. 

R. O. T. C. STAFF 

COLONEL WILLIAM D. PASCHALL, B. S. Professor of Military 

Science and Tactics 

B. S., Vanderbilt University; Graduate of the Field Artillery 

School, Fort Sill, Oklahoma. 

MAJOR FRANK E. WILLARD, B. S. Assistant Professor 

of Military Science and Tactics 

B. S., Middle Tennessee State Teachers College; Graduate of 

the Field Artillery School, Fort Sill, Oklahoma. 

FIRST LIEUTENANT ROBERT H. ALLEN, JR. Assistant Professor 

of Military Science and Tactics 

Graduate of Maryland Institute Mechanical Engineering; 

Graduate of the AA Artillery School, Camp Davis, North Carolina. 

MASTER SERGEANT CHARLES E. CANTLEY Sergeant Major and 

Assistant Instructor 

MASTER SERGEANT WILLARD E. CLARK Operations Sergeant 

and Assistant Instructor 

MASTER SERGEANT ALBERT F. MELVILLE Motor Sergeant 

and Assistant Instructor 

MASTER SERGEANT DANIEL C. THOMAS First Sergeant 

and Assistant Instructor 

TECHNICAL SERGEANT THURMAN H. BOND Supply Sergeant 

and Assistant Instructor 
and Assistant Instructor 

STAFF SERGEANT LOUIS W. GREENE Artillery Mechanic 

and Assistant Instructor 

TECHNICAL SERGEANT SHELDON COFFMAN Communications Sergeant 



ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF 

W. A. AULT, Superintendent of Buildings and Grounds 

FRED BALLOU, Book Store Manager 

MRS. HARRY BLANTON, Hostess 

LOUISE BROADDUS, A. B., Recorder, Registrar's Office 

MRS. KATHERINE CHENAULT, A. B., Hostess, 
Student Union Building 

MRS. J. D. CHENAULT, Housekeeper, Burnam Hall 

LOIS COLLEY, Assistant to the Alumni Secretary 

NANCY DURHAM, A. B., Stenographer, President's Office 

BEATRICE COINS, B. S., Assistant to the Director of 
Public Relations 

MRS. BESSIE H. GRIGGS, Information Clerk 

JO ANN HAGAN, Stenographer, Business Office 

MRS. JOHN HAGAN, Social Director, Burnam Hall 

MRS. J. W. HILL, Assistant Director of the Cafeteria 

MRS. MAUDE HILL, A. B., Cashier 

MRS. C. A. KEITH, Housemother, Men's Dormitories 

E. P. McCONNELL, Bookkeeper 

EDITH L. McILVAINE, Supervisor of the Cafeteria 

MARY MITCHELL, Assistant to the Business Agent 

L. KATHERINE MORGAN, Secretary to the President and 

Secretary to Board of Regents 

MRS. DUDLEY MURPHY, Accounts Clerk 

CHARLOTTE NEWELL, Secretary to the Dean of Women 

MRS. HELEN W. PERRY, Assistant to the Director of Personnel 

CARRIE POTTS, Secretary to the Registrar 

MARTHA J. SARGENT, R. N., College Nurse 

MARTHA H. SHARP, B. S., Secretary to the Director of Public 

Relations 

MAYE M. WALTZ, Secretary to the Dean 

EUNICE WINGO, Assistant to the Dean of Women 



FACULTY ORGANIZATION 

CHAIRMEN OF DIVISIONS OF INSTRUCTION 

Applied Arts and Sciences .W. J. Moore 

Agriculture Chairman 

Commerce 

Home Economics 

Indiistrial Arts 

Library Science 

Fine Arts Frederic P. Giles 

Art Chairman 

Music 

Biological and Physical Sciences Thomas C. Herndon 

Biology Chairman 

Chemistry 

General Science 

Geology 

Physics 

Education D. Thomas Ferrell 

Elementary Education Chairman 

Educational Psychology 
Public School Administration 
Secondary Education 
Training Schools 

Health and Physical Education Charles T. Hughes 

Health Chairman 

Physical Education 

Languages Roy B. Clark 

English Chairman 

French 

German 

Latin 

Spanish 

Mathematics Smith Park 

Chairman 

Social Sciences C. A. Keith 

Geography Chairman 

Government 

History 

Sociology 



COMMITTEES 

ADVISORY COUNCIL ON STUDENT PERSONNEL 

Moore, Ballou, Brock, Case, Chenault, Cuff, Edwards, Floyd, 
Keith, Mattox 

ADVISORY COUNCIL ON PUBLICATIONS 

Moore, Adams, Clark, Dorris, Engle, Floyd, Gill 

ALUMNI 

Adams, Allen, Barnes, Broaddus, Carty, Case, Chenault, Coates, 

Doty, Durham, Floyd, Goins, Hill, McKinney, Moore, Neale, 

Regenstein, Richards, Rigby, Rutledge, Sharp, 

Story, Turner, Tyng, Wickersham, Wilson 

ATHLETICS 

Park, Coates, Grise, Hughes, LaFuze, Samuels 

CREDITS AND CREDENTIALS 

Mattox, Carter, Clark, Cuff, Herndon, Park, Schroeter 

ENTRANCE EXAMINATIONS 

Mattox, Barnhill, Burns, Gill, McKinney, Turner, Walker 

EVALUATION 

Cuff, Adams, Coates, Cox, Ford, Herndon, Hounchell, 
Keene, Lee, Turner, and four students 

EXTENSION 

Carty, Carter, Adams, Dorris, Engle 

FINE ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT 

Giles, Buchanan, Campbell, Graham, Kennamer, McPherson, Mur- 

bach, Seevers, Stone, Telford, Tyng, Van Peursem, 

and four students 

GRADUATE INSTRUCTION 

Moore, Barnhill, Clark, Coates, Ferrell, Giles, Keith, Kennamer, 
Mattox, Park, Schnieb 

GRADUATION 

Kennamer, Case, Keith, Mattox, Moore 



RICHMOND, KENTUCKY 23 

LIBRARY 

Floyd, Dorris, Ferrell, Giles, Herndon, Hood, Keene, LaFuze, Lee, 

McKinney, Moore, Park, Van Peursem, two juniors, 

and two seniors 

PERMANENT PLANNING 

Clark, Burrier, Carter, Cox, Deniston, Edwards, Ferrell, Hughes, 

Giles, Keith, Kennamer, LaFuze, Mattox, Moore, Murbach, 

Park, Van Peursem, and four students 

PUBLIC RELATIONS 

Carty, Burns, Coates, Deniston, Ford, Keene, Kennamer, Lee, 
Mattox, Seevers, Slater, Whalin, and four students 

RURAL EDUCATION 

Ferrell, Case, Dorris, Edwards, Engle, Hansen, Regenstein, Story, 
Tyng, Wilson, Wingo, and four students 

RULES 

Park, Carter, Case, Edwards, Fowler, Keith, Mattox 

SOCIAL 

Case, Burrier, Burns, Cox, Cuff, Fowler, Herndon, Keith, Lee, Tyng, 
and eight students 

STANDARDS 

Moore, Case, Cuff, Keith, Mattox 

STUDENT GUIDANCE AND PERSONNEL 

Cuff, Adams, Burrier, Deniston, Engle, Ford, Giles, Gill, Grise, 
Herndon, Kennamer, LaFuze, Lewis, McPherson, Samuels 

STUDENT LOANS, SCHOLARSHIPS, AND FELLOWSHIPS 

Cuff, Brock, Case, Cox, Keith, Schnieb 

STUDENT UNION 

Chenault, Ballou, Case, Mcllvaine, O'Donnell, and five students 

STUDENT WELFARE 

Keith, Case, Coates, Ford, Moore, Park, Whalin, Whitehead 

VETERANS 

Mattox, Cox, Ferrell, Grise, Keene 

VISUAL EDUCATION 

Gumbert, Dorris, Floyd, LaFuze, Mattox, Pugh, Samuels, Tyng 

The President and Dean are ex officio members of all standing 
committees. 




THE PRESIDENT'S HOME 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



GENERAL INFORMATION 

ORGANIZATION 

The Eastern Kentucky State College is organized ou the semes- 
ter plan. The school year is divided into two semesters of eighteen 
weeks each and into a summer session. A student who attends botn 
semesters and the summer session can complete a full four-year 
college course in three calendar years. 

The College curricula are organized on various levels and lead 
to the Bachelor of Arts or the Bachelor of Science degree, and to 
the Master of Arts degree. Freshman and sophomore courses are 
offered in the Lower Division. Junior and senior courses are given 
in the Upper Division. Observation and Student Teaching are pro- 
vided in the Elementary and Secondary Training Schools. The 
Graduate Division offers work for those who want to major in 
Education and minor in other departments. 

LOCATION 

Eastern Kentucky State College is conveniently located in 
Richmond, Madison County, Kentucky. Richmond is on the main 
line of the L. & N. Railway, 112 miles south of Cincinnati, Ohio. 
The College can be reached easily by automobile. It is on the Dixie 
Highway (U. S. No. 25), 26 miles southeast of Lexington; on U. S. 
Highway No. 227; and on Kentucky Highway No. 52. 

Richmond is a city of about 7500 people. It is located in the 
famous Bluegrass Region of Kentucky and presents many advan- 
tages as a college community. 

Eastern is surrounded by places of historic and scenic interest. 
These places of interest in'"''ude: Boonesboro (12 miles). Clay's 
Ferry Bridge — one of the N.; don's finest (13 miles), Harrodsburg 
and Shakertown (45 miles), Herrington Lake (35 miles), Cumber- 
land Falls (100 miles). State Capitol at Frankfort (55 miles), Berea 
College (14 miles), Kentucky Natural Bridge State Park (63 miles). 
My Old Kentucky Home (85 miles), Louisville (100 miles), Lincoln 
Memorial (110 miles), the foothills of the Cumberland Mountain 
(20 miles), and the famous stock farms in the heart of the Blue- 
grass Region (26 miles). 

HISTORY 

The year the State of Massachusetts established normal schools 
for the preparation of teachers, Kentucky established a public 
school system. The first Superintendent of Public Instruction of 
Kentucky in his initial report requested the General Assembly to 
pass legislation for "the founding of one or more normal schools 
for the purpose of training the sons of the soil for teaching." Fif- 



28 EASTERN STATE COLLEGE 

teen different state superintendents appeared before more than 
thiry sessions of the Legislature making the same plea for a school 
for teachers. Sixty-eight years passed before the General Assembly 
of 1906 heeded this request. The late J. C. W. Beckham, Governor 
of the State at that time, signed the bill establishing the Eastern 
Kentucky State Normal School on March 21, 1906, and shortly after 
a commission selected the campus of old Central University at 
Richmond as the site of the new school. 

The curriculum has been improved from the short review and 
certificate courses of the first years. Eastern now offers four-year 
curricula leading to the Bachelor of Arts or the Bachelor of 
Science degree in teacher education and in general or professional 
areas. A one-year graduate curriculum leads to the Master of Arts 
degree in Education. Requirements for college entrance have been 
raised from eighth grade graduation or possession of any kind of 
certificate to graduation from an accredited high school. 

The College has been directed by five presidents: Ruric Nevel 
Roark, 1906-1909; John Grant Crabbe, 1910-1916; Thomas Jackson 
Coates, 1916-1928; Herman Lee Donovan, 1928-1941; William 
Francis O'Donnell, 1941 — . 

PURPOSE 

Eastern has for its general purpose the development of vigor- 
ous health, thorough scholarship, strong professional spirit, broad 
culture, and balanced personality in its students. Courses of study 
and extra-curricular activities are devoted to the concept that 
character and services are the highest aims of education. ' ' 

The specific aims of the College are: 

A. The primary aim of the Eastern Kentucky State College is 
to prepare teachers for the schools of Kentucky. The College was 
established to prepare teachers and it has held to that purpose 
with such expansions and modifications as are needed to maintain 
progressive educational policies and practices. 

B. Another aim is to provide instruction in general and 
specialized fields so that students may be prepared for professional, 
technical, and industrial careers. The College has many students 
who are pursuing successfully courses of a pre-professional or vo- 
cational nature. Such students secure excellent liberal arts work in 
various departments leading to a baccalaureate degree in the 
sciences or in the arts. 

C. A third aim of Eastern is to make a real contribution to 
the life of the community and the area which it serves. The institu- 
tion attempts to meet this obligation by: 



RICHMOND, KENTUCKY 29 

1. Preparing only worthy teachers. 

2. Conducting extension courses (either on the campus or 
off), and study centers when requested. 

3. Furnishing expert advice or other assistance at teachers' 
conferences. 

4. Supplying speakers for high school commencements and 
other community activities. 

5. Keeping a personal interest in the graduates and encourag- 
ing professional and intellectual growth. 

6. Keeping in close touch with the needs of the teachers in 
the field and by being ready to give assistance to the 
teachers. 

7. Holding on the College campus conferences for the further 
development of leaders. 

8. Supplying to the teachers of the community which the 
College serves library materials and other materials such 
as visual aids. 







A CAMPUS DRIVE 



BUILDINGS AND FACILITIES 

THE CAMPUS 

The beauty of Eastern's campus lies in the gently rolling blue- 
grass slopes and in the stately forest trees and shrubs. The campus 
is further enhanced by a replica of an ancient Greek Amphi- 
theater which has a seating capacity of 2,50-0. 

The College plant, valued at approximately $3,250,000.00, in- 
cludes eighteen beautiful and well-equipped buildings located on 
more than 225 acres of bluegrass land. 

COATES ADMINISTRATION BUILDING 

The Thomas Jackson Coates Administration Building was 
named in honor of Eastern's third president. The offices of the 
President, Dean, Registrar, Personnel Director, Business Agent, 
Director of Public Relations, and of some instructors are located 
in this building. There are also classrooms in the Administration 
Building. 

HIRAM BROCK AUDITORIUM 

The Hiram Brock Auditorium was named in honor of Senator 
Hiram Brock who served as a member of the Board of Regents. 
It adjoins the Administration Building and has a seating capacity 
of 2,000. The Auditorium has a stage 40 feet by 30 feet, equipped 
with adequate curtains and drops, a modern movie projection 
room, and a Hammond electric organ. It also contains studios 
and dressing rooms. 

PRESIDENT'S HOME 

The two-story brick residence, which is the President's Home, 
was constructed in 1889 as a residence for the Chancellor of Cen- 
tral University but did not become the property of the College 
until 1912. 

ROARK BUILDING 

Roark Building has recently been completely repaired and re- 
decorated. It provides excellent facilities for the departments of 
mathematics, chemistry, biology, physics, geography, and geology, 
It was named in honor of Dr. Ruric Novel Roark, Eastern's first 
president. 



32 EASTERN STATE COLLEGE 

CAMMACK BUILDING 

The James W. Cammack Building was named for a man who 
was appointed to the first Board of Regents for the College in 1906 
and who remained on the Board as an efficient and faithful member 
until his death in 1939. The building is designed and used en- 
tirely for the elementary grades of the College Training School. 

RURAL DEMONSTRATION SCHOOL 

The Rural Demonstration School, located on the College Farm 
near the campus, is a model brick building. It serves as a 
laboratory in which students who plan to teach in the one-room 
rural schools of the State may get practical experience. 

UNIVERSITY BUILDING 

The University Building, a handsome, four-story brick struc- 
ture, was constructed in 1874 and, as a result of excellent main- 
tenance, still serves as well as when it was built more than seventy 
years ago. It stands as a landmark on the campus and houses 
the high school division of the Eastern Kentucky State College 
Training School. 

CRABBE LIBRARY 

The John Grant Crabbe Library houses over 80,000 volumes 
and several hundred periodicals. The John Wilson Townsend Col- 
lection of Kentuckiana, located in the Eastern Library, consists of 
more than 4,000 volumes. It is one of the most extensive of its 
kind in existence. The Library was named in honor of Eastern's 
second president, John Grant Crabbe, who served the institution 
from 1909 to 1916. 

WEAVER HEALTH BUILDING 

The Weaver Health Building is named for the late Charles F. 
Weaver of Ashland, Kentucky, who served on the Board of Regents 
at Eastern from 1920 to 1932. It is one of the largest and best 
equipped buildings on the campus. In it there are two gymnasi- 
ums, one 110 feet by 90 feet and one 74 feet by 40 feet; a large 
variety of physical education apparatus; an official-size tile swim- 
ming pool equipped with machinery for heating, filtering, and 
purifying all water that enters the pool; more than 1,200 steel 
lockers for the use of the students; offices of members of the 
health and physical education staff; several classrooms; ROTO 
headquarters; and the bacteriology laboratory. 

FITZPATRICK ARTS BUILDING 

The Fitzpatrick Arts Building houses three departments of 
the College; Industrial Arts, Home Economics, and Art. Modern 



RICHMOND, KENTUCKY 33 

machinery and the latest teaching equipment are available to 
students taking work in these departments. It is named for the 
Honorable H. D. Fitzpatrick who was a member of the Board of 
Regents of the College. 

HOME ECONOMICS PRACTICE HOUSE 

The Practice House is the residence for those students in the 
Home Economics Department who take the laboratory course in 
Household Management. Here the girls live and work together 
for about twelve weeks, co-operatively preparing their own meals, 
doing their own marketing, entertaining their guests, and making 
a pleasant home life for themselves. 

TELFORD MUSIC BUILDING 

The; Telford Music Building, located on the campus, was 
formerly the manse of the First Presbyterian Church. In it are 
the studios of the teachers of music, except the dir.eetor, and sev- 
eral practice rooms. It is named for Dr. R. L. Telford, who was 
minister of the First Presbyterian Church for many years. 

JOHNSON STUDENT UNION BUILDING 

Eastern's newest and finest building is the Keen Johnson 
Student Union Building. This building contains club rooms for 
students, recreation halls, the Little Theater, student post office, 
bookstore, soda fountain and grill, dining halls, the faculty club 
rooms, and a spacious reception room. It was named in honor 
of a former Governor of Kentucky who also served on the Board 
of Regents. The Student Union Building was constructed by 
means of a Federal grant and a bond issue at no direct cost to the 
State. 

HANGER STADIUM 

The Hanger Stadium was built as a gift from students, faculty, 
and friends of the College, supplemented by a PWA grant. This 
concrete, steel, and tile structure has dormitory accommodations 
for thirty men students, offices for coaches, dressing and equipment 
roomSj and showers. The seating capacity is 5,000. 

STATELAND FARM 

New Stateland Farm, owned and operated by the College, con- 
sists of approximately 185 acres and the total College-owned 
acreage is approximately 225 acres. The Farm is used as a labora- 
tory by the Department of Agriculture. Vegetables, fruits and 
dairy products from the Farm are used in the College Cafeteria. 

Eastern — 2 



34 EASTERN STATE COLLEGE 

The Farm is the home of one of the finest purebred Holstein 
dairy herds in the country. New Stateland Hall is located on the 
Farm and is used as a residence by the manager and as a men's 
dormitory. 

POWER PLANT 

The Power Plant serves a^ a central heating unit for all the 
buildings on the campus. 

BECKHAM HALL, McCBEARY HALL, MILLEB HALL, 
AND MEMOBIAL HALL 

The dormitories for men consist of four separate units: Beck- 
ham Hall, McCreary Hall, Miller Hall, and Memorial Hall. The 
first three units provide excellent dormitory accommodations for 
48 men each. Memorial Hall provides accommodations for 60 men. 
The total capacity of the four units is 204 men. The rooms in 
Beckham, McCreary, and Miller Halls are arranged in suites of 
four with one adjoining bath. For each pair of such sections, one 
above the other, there is a private outside entrance. There are 
no halls except those necessary to connect each group of four 
rooms with the outside entrance and the bath. Prospective stud- 
ents are invited to inspect the dormitories by appointment with 
the Dean of Men. 

Beckham Hall is named for the late J. C. W. Beckham, who 
was governor of Kentucky when Eastern was founded. McCreary 
Hall is named for James B. McCreary, a Richmond citizen, who 
twice served the State as Chief Executive. Miller Hall is named 
for Robert W. Miller, a Madison Countian, who introduced in the 
lower house of the General Assembly a bill establishing Eastern. 
Memorial Hall derived its name from a building constructed by 
Central University. 

BURNAM HALL 

Burnam Hall was named for Judge A. R. Burnam who served 
in the Senate and helped Eastern secure her first significant ap- 
propriation. It provides beautiful, comfortable, and fireproof liv- 
ing quarters for 370 students. Most of the rooms are arranged 
in suites of two with a connecting bath. A few rooms have pri- 
vate baths. Prospective students are invited to inspect rooms in 
the dormitories for women by appointment with the Dean of 
Women. These buildings are open practically every day in the 
year. 

SULLIVAN HALL 

Sullivan Hall is a dormitory for women and accommodates 
approximately 158 students. It was named for the first local 
regent, Mr. Jere A. Sullivan, who helped establish the first two 



RICHMOND, KENTUCKY 35 

normal schools in Kentucky. Sullivan Hall is a comfortable and 
convenient home for the women who choose to live there. Cen- 
tral baths are located on each floor of the building. 

INDIVIDUAL RESIDENCES 

There are few individual residence buildings which are a 
part of the campus. One is a two-story brick building that was a 
part of the Central University plant. It is the residence of the 
Superintendent of Buildings and Grounds. 

VETERANS' HOMES 

The College is making special efforts to meet the needs of 
Veterans for homes. A hundred pre-fabricated houses or apart- 
ments have been located on the campus at Eastern for occupancy 
by Veterans and their families. Dormitory facilities have been 
secured for one hundred additional single Veterans. Further in- 
formation regarding Veterans' homes on the College campus or 
in Richmond may be secured by writing the College. 




BURNAM HALL 
A Dormitory for Women 



STUDENT SERVICES AND ACTIVITIES 

Living Accommodations. — Students who do not live in dormi- 
tories are required to live in homes approved by the College. All 
Students not living in their own homes, whether rooming in the 
dormitories, in private homes, or in rooming houses, are subject 
to the regulations and supervision of the College. 

Dormitory Rooms for Women Students. — ^Women students are 
required to occupy dormitory rooms while rooms are available on 
the campus. After the dormitory accommodations for 528 students 
are filled, women students may take rooms in private homes in 
Richmond, but should not engage rooms without first consulting 
the Dean of Women. 

Dormitory Rooms for Men Students. — Dormitory rooms will be 
reserved for men who meet admission requirements as long as 
facilities are available. The dormitories for men accommodate 234 
students. 

Rate of Room Rent for Women Students. — The rate of room 
rent varies according to the location, furnishings, equipment, and 
the number of students occupying a room. 

BURNAM HALL— 

Front rooms $45.00 per semester per student 

All rooms — South Section 36.00 per semester per student 

All rooms — North Section 31.50 per semester per student 

SULLIVAN HALL— 

All rooms $31.50 per semester per student 

Rate of Room Rent for Men Students. — Room rent varies ac- 
cording to the facilities provided. 

MEMORIAL HALL— 

All rooms in this hall rent for $31.50 per semester per student 

BECKHAM HALL, McCREARY HALL, AND MILLER HALL— 

All rooms in these halls rent for $41.50 per semester per student 

Linen Service Included in Room Rent. — The rate of room rent 
listed above for all dormitories includes the linen service for 
which a separate charge was made formerly. This service includes 
the providing by the College of sheets and pillow cases for all 
rooms and the expense of having them laundered. 

Dormitoiy Room Reservations. — Students desiring to have 
rooms reserved in the dormitories should write for application 
forms. When applying for dormitory reservations, students should 




-»^»^fe>^^&w 



SULLIVAN HALL 
A Dormitory for Women 



RICHMOND, KENTUCKY 39 

mention the price of room preferred. Applications for room res- 
ervations are filled in the order in which they are received. Rooms 
can generally be assigned promptly upon receipt of applications; 
however, reservations are subject to cancellation unless a student 
has complied with Admission and Scholarship requirements. 

Room reservations cannot be transferred and are void unless 
claimed by 4:30 p. m. on the opening day of the semester. 

Room De|»osit. — When an application is made for a room, the 
student must pay a deposit fee of $5.00. This fee is retained by the 
College as a guarantee of the proper care of room and furnishings. 
At the termination of the student's stay in the dormitory, the 
whole or such part of it as may be due after deduction for damage 
is made, will be refunded to the student. 

Requests for cancellation of room reservation must be re- 
ceived not later than twenty days before the opening: of the 
semester or term for which reservation was made; otherwise, room 
deposit is forfeited to the College and will not be refunded. 

Off-Campus Rooms for Students. — Students interested in rent- 
ing off-campus rooms may secure a list by writing to the College. 

College Cafeteria. — The Cafeteria is operated by the College 
for the convenience of the students. Most of the students, includ- 
ing those who live off the campus as well as those who live on 
the campus, find it to their advantage to take their meals in the 
cafeteria. 

Book Store. — -The College Book Store is located on the ground 
floor of the Student Union Building. It is operated by the College 
and provides books and classroom supplies to students at reason- 
able prices. A grill is operated in connection with the Book Store. 

College Post Office. — The College Post Office provides mail 
service for all students who live in the dormitories. An individual 
lock box is assigned to each person. The Post Office is located on 
the ground floor of the Student Union Building. Students re- 
ceiving their mail through the College Post Office should have 
all mail addressed in the following manner: Mr. John Smith, Box 
231, College Post Office, Eastern Kentucky State College, Richmond, 
Kentucky. 

Students with off-campus rooms do not receive their mail 
through the College Post Office. Their mail should be sent to the 
address where they are living. 

Student Health Service. — The student health service at East- 
ern is under the direction of the College Physician and a nurse. 
The service includes an annual physical examination for each 
student, medical advice and attention at all times, immimizations 
against contagious diseases, and limited hospitalization. Classes 
are conducted in first aid, safety, and personal and community 




BECKHAM HALL 

One of the Dormitories for Men 



RICHMOND, KENTUCKY 41 

hygiene. The health program at Eastern emphasizes preventive 
treatment. No charge is made for any of these services to the 
student. 

Athletics. — Eastern has intercollegiate athletic teams in foot- 
ball, basketball, baseball, track, tennis, and swimming. These 
teams participate in a schedule of contests with other college teams 
each year. Eastern is a member of the Kentucky Intercollegiate 
Athletic Conference and the Southern Intercollegiate Athletic As- 
sociation. All official intercollegiate athletic events in which the 
College participates are governed by the rules and regulations of 
these two organizations. 

Play and Recreation. — Eastern affords its students opportun- 
ities for play and recreation. Recreational activities are required 
of all freshmen and sophomores. These activities, offered during 
school hours, are varied and seasonal. The aims are to develop 
regular habits of play, physical strength, vigor and sportsman- 
ship. Sports, such as playground baseball, volley ball, soccer, 
speedball, hockey, lacrosse, track, field archery, handball, lower 
organized games and their modifications, are offered. 

Every student has an opportunity to participate in the leisure- 
time activities which are offered in seasonal tournaments. 

The Swinimingr Pool. — The swimming pool in the Weaver 
Health Building serves both the college and the training schools. 
Only bona fide students and those officially connected with the 
institution are permitted to use the pool. A complete physical 
examination and a health certificate are required for admission. 
Students who expect to use the pool should see the college phy- 
sician and arrange to take a physical examination. Regu- 
lation cotton bathing suits are required. Admission to the pool is 
strictly according to schedule. 

Student Guidance and Personnel Services. — The personnel 
program at Eastern is planned to help students meet their 
individualized needs and to achieve success. Also to help stud- 
ents avoid experiences which are likely to be too costly, the best 
available tools, techniques, and resources are used. 

The personnel services of the College are related to: (1) Ad- 
mission of new students; (2) orientation of freshmen; (3) evalu- 
ation and counseling of students; (4) mental and physical health; 
(5) provision for well-rounded student activities; (6) supervision 
of adequate living facilities; (7) maintenance of useful personnel 
records; (8) provision for employment, placement, and follow-up 
requirements. 

Many staff members handle various aspects of the personnel 
work. The Dean of the College, the Registrar, the Dean of Women, 



42 EASTERN STATE COLLEGE 

the Dean of Men, the Director of Personnel, and in fact, all mem- 
bers of the faculty counsel students. The College Physician handles 
health problems; the Dean of Women and the Dean of Men pro- 
vide counsel relative to social life, living facilities, and related 
problems of students; and other consultants render specialized 
guidance as needed by students and as implied by a modern 
philosophy of education. 

Personnel services are provided at Eastern for all new 
students; additional, optional services are available to help indi- 
viduals with their planning; and clinical services are arranged to 
meet special needs. All personnel activities are designed to be 
practical. They are provided to help students attain a maximum 
personal, social, and academic development in a stimulating en- 
vironment. 

Opportunity for Student Employment. — ^A limited number of 
students may earn a part of their expenses by working for the 
College Cafeteria, Library, Book Store, Post Office, Dormitories, 
Administrative Offices, College Farm, etc. Some students may 
also secure part-time employment in Richmond stores, restaurants, 
and other business establishments. 

Students are advised not to enter expecting employment of 
this kind unless they have arranged for it in advance. All applica- 
tions for student employment should be addressed to: The Dean, 
Eastern Kentucky State College, Richmond, Kentucky. As a gen- 
eral rule students should enter Eastern prepared to pay all their 
expenses for at least one semester. 

Vocational Rehabilitation. — Students with physical handicaps 
of various kinds may be approved for Vocational Rehabilitation 
and receive all registration and tuition fees and school supplies 
for nine months of a year. Persons Who wish to consult with a 
representative relative to Vocational Rehabilitation should write 
to the Department of Education, Division of Special Education, 
Frankfort, Kentucky, for specific instructions. 

Loans. — The student loan fund of the Eastern Kentucky State 
College is designed to help worthy students complete their educa- 
tion. It has been augmented from time to time by gifts from dif- 
ferent individuals and organizations and is being increased an- 
nually. Small loans are available to upper-class students. Those 
having high scholarship records will be given preference in the 
granting of loans. This fund makes it possible for a student 
to borrow a small amount of money on a personal note at 
legal rate of interest. Students who desire further information 
concerning this fund should get in touch with the Chairm-an of 
the Student Aid Committee. 



RICHMOND, KENTUCKY 43 

William Davis Scholarships. — Under the provisions of the will 
of the late William Davis of Newport, Kentucky, a sum of money 
was left for the benefit of students living in the Lona Estella Davis 
school district of Rowan County, to be used as scholarships at the 
Eastern Kentucky State College. These scholarships of $200.00 
each are awarded by the superintendent of Rowan County schools 
and the president of the Eastern Kentucky State College. A student 
desiring to secure one of these scholarships should write to the 
Chairman of Student Aid Society, Eastern Kentucky State College, 
or make application to the Superintendent of Rowan County 
Schools. 

Music Scholarships. — The College awards annually three 
scholarships of $54.00 each to those students who make the most 
satisfactory progress in piano, voice, and violin. 

Science Club Medal. — The Science Club presents annually a 
medal to that senior majoring in any of the sciences who has 
achieved the highest standing in science during his college course. 

Regents Medal for Oratory. — The Regents of the College pre- 
sent annually a medal for the best oration given by a college 
student under the direction of the proper authorities. 

Kappa Delta Pi Scholarship Award. — Delta Alpha Chapter of 
Kappa Delta Pi presents annually a medal to the sophomore with 
the highest scholastic standing. 

Student Service Award. — An award presented annually by 
members of the Young Women's and Young Men's Christian Asso- 
ciations to that member of the graduating class who, during his or 
her four years at Eastern, has given the greatest measure of service 
to fellow students. 

Fine Arts Series. — It is the purpose of Eastern to surround her 
students with every cultural advantage. To this end much time 
and effort are expended to provide programs by the foremost ar- 
tists. Each student is able to attend these concerts at a very small 
expense. 

Assembly Programs. — Regular and special College assemblies 
are held for students, faculty members, and visitors. A definite 
time is set aside in schedules for the regular assembly. Important 
College matters are officially presented at assemblies and school 
spirit is cultivated. Assembly programs are designed as a part of 
the liberal education offered by the College. The programs consist 
of inspirational addresses, lectures of general interest, concerts, 
dramatic performances, class programs, and other numbers. The 
programs are given by guests, faculty members, and students. 



44 EASTERN STATE COLLEGE 

Regular attendance at assemblies is required. — The Board of 
Regents has passed a resolution stating: "It is the opinion of the 
Board that assembly programs are a vital part of the instruction 
offered by a teachers college." They further say: "Because of its 
fundamental value, we expect both students and faculty members 
to attend these programs." 

Church Affiliations. — ^Eastern is a state-supported institution 
and is, therefore, non-denominational. Several fine churches are 
located in Richmond and students are encouraged to attend the 
services. 

Student Organizations. — The student organizations, societies, 
and clubs at Eastern are varied enough in their activities to in- 
clude the interests of all the students. While the membership in 
them is voluntary, all students find it to their advantage to iden- 
tify themselves with at least one of these activities. Students re- 
ceive in these extra-curricular activities a type of training which is 
impossible for them to get in the classroom. The opportunity for 
social life among the students, along with the professional and 
intellectual interests, is a valuable featinre of the student activities. 
Student organizations at Eastern include: 

Departmental Clubs. — Agriculture, Alpha Rho Tau (Art), Can- 
terbury Club (English Majors), Cercle Francais, Elementary 
Coimcil (Elementary Education), Future Teachers of America, 
Home Economics Club, Iota Alpha Gamma (Industrial Arts Club), 
Mathematics, Physical Education, Science, Sigma Tau Pi (Com- 
merce Majors), Social Science, World Affairs. 

...,.* ^ . 

Literary and Dramatic Clubs. — Alpha Zeta Kappa (Public 
Speaking and Debating), Little Theater Club, Great Books Foun- 
dation. 

Musical Organizations. — Choir, College Band, College Dance 
Orchestra, Madrigal Club (Upper-class Girls' Glee Club), Men's 
Glee Club, Messiah Chorus, Orchestra. 

Professional Clubs. — Caduceus Club (Medicine, Dentistry), 
Phalanx Club (ROTC). 

Regional Clubs. — Regional clubs are organized by students 
from various cities, counties, and sections of the State. 

Religious Organizations. — Baptist Student Union, Catholic Club, 
Christian Youth Fellowship, Methodist Youth Fellowship, West- 
minster Fellowship, Young Women's Auxiliary, Young Men's 
Christian Association, Young Women's Christian Association. 

Miscellaneous Organizations. — "E" Club (Letter Students in 
Athletics), Kyma Club (Pep Club), Photo Club, College Red Cross 
Unit. 



RICHMOND, KENTUCKY 45 

Honorary Fraternities and Sororities. — Alpha Psi Omega (Na- 
tional Honorary Dramatic Fraternity), Kappa Delta Pi (Honorary 
Educational Society), Pi Omega Pi (National Commercial Teach- 
ers), Cwens (National Honorary Society for Sophomore Women). 

Publications. — Eastern sponsors two types of publications; one 
is edited by the faculty and the other is edited by students. 

The Eastern Kentucky Review is the official publication of the 
College. 

The Eastern Progress is published semi-monthly by students 
and is the newspaper of the College. 

The Milestone is the College Annual published each year 
by the representatives of the Senior Class. This publication con- 
tains photographic and statistical records of all organizations and 
events of the college year. 

Conunencement. — Commencements are held at the close of 
the spring semester and at the end of the summer session. Students 
who are candidates for degrees are required to participate in the 
commencement exercises unless excused by the President. A 
student who completes the requirements for a degree during the 
fall semester will receive the degree at the following spring com- 
mencement. 

Alumni Association. — The purpose of the Alumni Association 
is to promote fellowship among the ever-increasing number of 
graduates and to stimulate a mutual interest between the Institu- 
tion and her former students. All graduates and former students 
are considered members of the Alumni Association. Those who 
pay dues of $1.00 per year are active members. Dues should be 
mailed to the Alumni Secretary, Eastern Kentucky State College. 

Extension Division. — Eastern provides, through the Extension 
Division, correspondence courses, extension class instruction, lec- 
turers, and various types of public school service. 

The correspondence courses are prepared and conducted by 
regular members of the faculty and are, in so far as possible, 
identical with resident courses. For further details see the Exten- 
sion Division Bulletin or write to the Director of Extension. 

Regular members of the faculty conduct extension classes in 
cities and communities where teachers desire to pursue work in 
class groups in practically the same way as they would in resi- 
dence. The cost of extension class instruction is reasonable. For 
further details see the Extension Division Bulletin or write to the 
Director of Extension. 

A maximum of 32 semester hours of the required 128 hours 
for a Bachelor's degree may be earned by correspondence and 



46 EASTERN STATE COLLEGE 

extension. One-half of the work required for the renewal of a 
certificate may be earned by correspondence and extension. Those 
who plan to teach and take work in the Extension Division should 
distribute the work over the year. 

Correspondence credit is recorded as having been earned at 
the time of completion of the final test. The above restrictions 
are Statewide and apply to all institutions alike. 

Bureau of Appointments. — The Placement Bureau is main- 
tained by the College to assist students and ex-students in obtain- 
ing positions and to aid superintendents, principals, and other 
public school officials to secure the best qualified individuals to fill 
their vacancies. No charge is made for this service. 




STUDENT UNION BUILDING 



ADMISSION TO THE COLLEGE 

I. Methods of Admission. — Candidates for admission to Eastern 
may be approved in any one of the following ways: 

1. By Diploma. Graduates of accredited high school are admitted 
by transcript if they show evidence of satisfactory personal 
characteristics and of ability to do college work. The general 
pattern of preparation for college should include two high 
school majors and one minor. Three units are required for a 
major and two units for a minor. One major must be in 
English. 

2. By Examination. High school students who possess fifteen 
units may secure admission by passing prescribed examinations 
or by making scores on classification tests equal to those of the 
average student. Veterans who have eight units of high school 
work and who have passed the G. E. D. Test will be admitted 
to the freshman class. Veterans who have less than eight units 
may be admitted on the G. E. D. Test provided the test scores 
and the previous preparation indicate that the student is pre- 
pared to do college work. 

3. By Special Approval. Persons over twenty-one years of age 
who wish to pursue courses as special students, without refer- 
ence to graduation, may be granted that privilege if they have 
adequate preparation for the desired courses. 

4. By Advanced Standing. Students wishing to enter Eastern 
from other colleges of recognized standing must have complete 
official transcripts on file in the Registrar's Office showing a 
statement of honorable dismissal. 

II. Application for Admission. — Applications for Admission 
to the Eastern Kentucky State College cannot be unconditionally 
approved until transcripts of credits are filed in the Office of the 
Registrar. As soon as possible after an Application for Admission 
and a Transcript of Credits are received, the candidate will be 
notified whether or not he is accepted. 

It is the responsibility of the applicant to have the following 
items sent to the Registrar prior to the opening date of a term: 

1. An application for admission, properly filled out by the appli- 
cant, should be made upon a regulation blank furnished by the 
Registrar. 

2. A transcript of the secondary school credits, issued after gradu- 
ation, should be mailed directly by the principal to the 
Registrar. 



RICHMOND, KENTUCKY 49 

An official transcript of any college credits and a statement 
of honorable dismissal, regardless of whether or not the stu- 
dent received credit for the work, should be mailed directly 
to: The Registrar, Eastern Kentucky State College, Richmond, 
Kentucky. 



STUDENT PROGRAMS AND REGULATIONS 

Classification of Students. — Students shall be classified as in- 
dicated below upon the completion of the respective number of 
hours, provided that the student has removed all entrance condi- 
tions: 

Freshman — Entrance requirements 

Sophomore — 26 semester hours 

Junior — 58 semester hours 

Senior — 90 semester hours 

Graduate — Baccalaureate degree 

How Courses are Numbered. — Courses are numbered according 
to the following plan: 

Courses numbered 100 to 199 are primarily for freshmen. 
Courses numbered 200 to 299 are primarily for sophomores. 
Courses numbered 300 to 399 are primarily for juniors. 
Courses numbered 400 to 499 are primarily for seniors. 
Courses numbered 500 to 599 are for graduate students. 

Grading System. — Grades are indicated by letters, to each of 
which is given a certain value in "grade points." The following is 
the interpretation placed upon the grading system: 



Grade 

A 

B 

C 

D 

F 

I 

Z 

The grades. A, B, C, D, and F cannot be changed by the in- 
structor. A grade of "D" gives credit toward a certificate or a 
degree if with such credits the student's standing is 1 or more. A 
grade of "I" shall be assigned only upon condition the student has 
been unable to complete the course on time because of unavoidable 
conditions. A grade of "I" must be made complete within one 
month after the student re-enters the Institution. All grades of 
"I" automatically become "F" if not completed at the end of a 
year. The grade of "Z" shall represent a degree of attainment in- 
ferior to that of a "D" and shall not entitle the student to any 
credit but shall promote him to a sequent course in the same 
department specified by the instructor or head of the department. 





Grade Points 




per semester 


Meaning 


Hour 


Excellent 


3 


Good 


2 


Average 


1 


Poor 





Failure 





Incomplete 




Conditioned 





RICHMOND, KENTUCKY 51 

On completion of this sequent course with a grade of "D" or higher, 
the mark of "Z" shall be changed automatically to a grade of "D." 
The standing of a student is defined as the ratio of his total 
number of "grade points" to his total number of semester hours' 
credit. In order for a student to fulfill the requirements for a cer- 
tificate or a degree he must offer a number of "grade points" at 
least as great as the number of semester Tiours. 

Student Load. — The normal load for a semester for undergrad- 
uate students is sixteen semester hours exclusive of Physical Edu- 
cation 110. The minimum load to be classed as a full-time student is 
twelve semester hours. Students w^ho have established superior 
records in the Institution may be permitted to enroll for more than 
sixteen semester hours provided the approval of the Dean of the 
College is secured at the time of registration. The maximum load, 
however, shall not exceed twenty-one hours exclusive of Physical 
Education 110. 

Correspondence work may be taken while in residence only on 
condition that it is counted as a part of the load. The combined 
load of correspondence and residence work can not exceed the 
amount the student may take in residence. This regulation applies 
regardless of the institution with which the student does corre- 
spondence work. 

Scholarship. — For a semester the minimum standard of achieve- 
ment which enables a student to re-enroll without question in the 
College is eight semester hours' credit and ten grade points. Stu- 
dents who fail to meet the above requirements may be re-admitted 
on probation. 

Withdrawal from Courses. — Necessary changes in courses must 
be made promptly after registration and should be approved by 
the Dean or the Director of Personnel. Permission to add a course 
will not be given after registration ends without special approval 
of the instructor. Approval to drop courses during the last month of 
a semester will not be given unless justified by conditions beyond 
the student's control. 

Withdrawal from the College. — Occasionally home conditions 
or some other factors make it necessary for students to withdraw. 
In such cases the student must see the President and arrange for 
the withdrawal. Any student who quits school or withdraws 
without securing the approval of the President may not register 
again unless the President sees fit to reinstate him. 

Official Schedule Changes. — The College reserves the right 
to cancel a course when the registration is not sufficient to warrant 
its continuance, to divide classes if the enrollment is too large for 
efficient instruction, and to change instructors when necessary. 
Additional courses will be organized if the demand is sufficient. 



52 EASTERN STATE COLLEGE 

General Requirements for the Baccalaureate Degrees. — ^The de- 
gree of Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science is conferred upon 
those students who have completed an approved four -year curri- 
culxnn. The minimum amount of credit required for the bachelor's 
degree is one hundred and twenty-eight semester hours of college 
credit exclusive of Physical Education 110. Not more than thirty- 
two semester hours of the work required for a degree may be 
earned by extension and/or correspondence. A candidate for a 
degree must have been in residence a minimum of thirty-six 
weeks (at least eighteen of which must have been in the senior 
year) and must have earned a minimum of thirty-two semester 
hours while in residence. 

The curriculum which the student expects to follow for the 
completion of the requirements for the bachelor's degree must be 
filed in the office of the Dean of the College not later than the end 
of the freshman year. In the case of transfer students the curric- 
ulum must be filed before the end of the first semester of resident 
work. The curriculum must be approved by the Dean of the College 
and by the major professor. 

Candidacy for Graduation. — A student planning to graduate in 
June should file application for a degree before the end of the first 
semester. Students who are planning to graduate in August should 
file application not later than the beginning of the second semester. 
Applications should be filed in the Registrar's Office. Fees for 
graduation are to be paid at the Business Office and receipts pre- 
sented to the Registrar's Office. 



EXPENSES 

Incidental Fees. — Incidental fees paid each semester entitle the 
student to limited health service, to use of the Library, to use of 
the Student Union Building, to attend certain Fine Arts programs, 
to a subscription to the "Eastern Progress," and to other services as 
directed by the Board of Regents. 

Each semester per student $35.00 

Additional out-of-state fee per semester 20.00 

Each semester for students carrying less than 12 hours 

per semester hour 3.00 

Each semester for graduate students per semester hour.... 3.00 

Laboratory. — The fees to be paid for laboratory courses are in- 
dicated in connection with descriptions of these courses in another 
part of this catalog. Laboratory fees cover the cost of materials and 
laboratory service furnished. 

The Milestone. — Students who register at Eastern during the 
regular academic year are required to pay a fee of $6.50 for the 
College Annual. 

Locker, Lock, Towel, and Uniform. — Students who use lockers 
in the Weaver Health Building are required to pay a rental of 
$2.50 per semester for use of locker, combination lock for locker, 
and towel. This fee includes laundry service for towels, bathing 
suits and gymnasium uniforms for the entire semester. 

Athletic. — Students who enroll for the fall semester pay an 
athletic fee of $3.00 plus the federal tax. Students who enter the 
Institution at the beginning of the second semester pay an athletic 
fee of $3.00 plus the federal tax. 

Late Registration. — Students who register after the opening 
date of a semester are required to pay a late registration fee of 
$2.00. 

Change of Schedule. — A fee of $1.00 will be charged for each 
voluntary change which a student makes in his schedule after it 
has been prepared and approved at the time of registration. 

Graduation. — The graduation fee for baccalaureate degrees is 
$7.50. The fee covers the cost of diploma, cap and gown rental, and 
other expenses incidental to graduation. 

The graduation fee for the Master of Arts degree is $15.00. The 
fee covers the cost of diploma and hood, and the rental of cap and 
gown. 



54 EASTERN STATE COLLEGE 

Special Examinations and Services. — When it is necessary to 
give a special examination to a student after the scheduled time for 
same a fee of 50 cents will be charged. This fee covers such services 
as physical examinations, classification tests, pictures, etc. A spe- 
cial examination as used here is not interpreted to mean examina- 
tions for entrance, course examinations, and examinations for ad- 
vanced standing. 

Transcript of Credits. — Each student will be given one tran- 
script of his work without charge. There will be a fee of $1.00 for 
each additional transcript after the first one has been furnished. 

Rate of Room Rent. — The rate of room rent varies from $31.50 
to $45.00 per semester. Specific prices are listed under Living Ac- 
commodations. 

Estimated Expenses. — The necessary college expenses for one 
semester average about $235.00. This estimated amount is based 
on the following itemized statement: 

Incidental fee $ 35.00* 

Board, if all meals are taken in the college cafeteria .... 126.00 
Board may be more or less than this amount, de- 
pending on the needs of the individual student. 

Room Rent ■... 38.00 

Room rent varies from $31.50 to $45.00 per semester 
for women and from $21.00 to $40.50 per semester 
for men. 

Books and supplies approximately 20.00 

Other expenses 15.00 

The above estimate does not include laundry, clothes, and per- 
sonal spending money. 

Students who take private music lessons and/or laboratory 
courses must add the respective fees to the above estimates in cal- 
culating the total expenses for a semester. Music and laboratory 
fees are listed in connection with course descriptions. 

All fees, including the incidental fee, are payable in advance. 
Board and room rent may be paid in two equal installments, one at 
the beginning of the semester and the other at the middle of the 
semester. 

* Each semester for out-of-state students, $55.00. 




THE LIBRARY 



^^. 



TEACHER-EDUCATION CURRICULA 

Degrees. — The Curricula offered by the College have been 
planned and developed to meet the needs of students who desire 
to become teachers, supervisors, and administrators in the public 
schools. Curricula are offered for the preparation of elementary 
teachers; for teachers of the special subjects of agriculture, art, 
commerce, health and physical education, industrial arts, music, 
and vocational home economics; and for the preparation of high 
school teachers in fields of biology, chemistry, English, French, 
geography and geology, history, Latin, mathematics, and physics. 
These curricula lead to the baccalaureate degrees and the Master of 
Arts degree with right of certification. 

TTie Bachelor o/ Arts "Degree is conferred upon students who 
major in art, English, French, geography and geology, history, 
Latin, music, and social science. 

The Bachelor of Science Degree is conferred upon students 
who major in agriculture, biology, chemistry, commerce, elemen- 
tary education, health and physical education, home economics, 
industrial arts, mathematics, and physics. 

The Master of Arts Degree is conferred upon students who 
complete the graduate program designed to meet the needs of 
teachers, supervisors, and educational administrators. 

Specific Requirements for Certificates and Degrees. — ^The codi- 
fied regulations relative to teacher education and certification, ap- 
proved by the Council on Public Higher Education and the State 
Board of Education and published by the State Department of 
Education, indicate minimum requirements for various types of 
certificates. 

PROVISIONAL ELEMENTARY CERTIFICATE 

The Provisional Elementary Certificate valid for three years 
shall be issued to a person who meets the general requirements of 
law and files a transcript of standard college credits showing the 
completion of the following curriculum: 

General and Special Preparation: 

Block 1 — English „ — 9 sem. hrs. 

Oral and Written Composition 6 sem. hrs. 

Children Literature _ 3 sem. hrs. 



Block II — Science _ _ 6 sem. hrs. 

Block III — Social Studies 9 sem. hrs. 

^a) A study of Western Civilization _ 6 sem. hrs. 

or 

(b) Introduction to Social Studies 6 sem. hrs. 

(c) Separate courses in Social Studies 3 sem. hrs. 



RICHMOND, KENTUCKY 57 



Block IV— Fine Arts _ _ .__ 6 sem. hrs. 

Public School Art __ 3 sem. hrs. 

Public School Music 3 sem. hrs. 

Block V — ^Health — 4 sem. hrs. 

Basic Health including health education, diet, com- 
munity health, individual health; 
Physical education in the Elementary School in- 
cluding plays and games, corrective activities, re- 
creation. 

Block VI — Professional Education 17 sem. hrs. 

Child Growth and Development 3 sem. hrs. 

Techniques 6 sem. hrs. 

Teaching Reading 

Teaching Arithmetic 

♦Fundamentals of Elementary Education 4 sem. hrs. 

♦Supervised Teaching 4 sem. hrs. 

Block VII — General Electives J 13 sem. hrs. 

Guidance serves as a basis for choice of electives. 



STANDARD ELEMENTARY CERTIFICATE 

The Standard Elementary Certificate valid for four years shall 
be issued to a person who completes a baccalaureate degree and 
meets the requirements for teaching in the elementary schools. 
This certificate may be re-issued or renewed every four years after 
three years of teaching experience during the life of the certificate 
or upon the presentation of one-half year of standard college or 
university work of graduate grade. The Standard Elementary Cer- 
tificate may be extended for life upon the presentation of evidence 
that the holder has had three years of teaching experience in the 
elementary field during the life of the certificate and has com- 
pleted the requirements for the Master's degree in a standard col- 
lege or university. Upon application to the Department of Educa- 
tion, a person shall be issued the Standard Elementary Certificate 
if he files a transcript of credits showing the completion of the 
following curriculum for elementary teachers: 

General and Specific Preparation 

Block I — English 18 sem. hrs. 

Oral and Written Composition _ 6 sem. hrs. 

Children's Literature .._ _.. -— 3 sem. hrs. 

American Literature and World Literature 6 sem. hrs. 

English Elective _ 3 sem. hrs. 

Block II— Science __ _. -12 sem. hrs. 

Block III— Social Studies, including 21 sem. hrs. 

(a) A study of Western Civilization 

(b) Introduction to Social Studies 

(c) Separate courses in social studies area 12 sem. hrs. 

Economics, History and Government, 

and Geography - 9 sem. hrs. 



* Fundamentals of Elementary Education with 8 sem. hrs. of credit may 
be offered for the Provisional Elementary Certificate in lieu of 4 sem. hrs. in 
Fundamentals and 4 sem. hrs. in Supervised Teaching in those institutions 
which have approved laboratory facilities. In such cases the work must 
include directed observation and participation. 



58 EASTERN STATE COLLEGE 



Block IV — Fine Arts 12 sem. hrs. 

Public School Art — - 3 sem. hrs. 

Elective in Art - — 3 sem. hrs. 

Public School Music 3 sem. hrs. 

Elective in Music — 3 sem. hrs. 

Block V— Health — — _ 6 sem. hrs. 

Basic health including health education, diet, com- 
munity health, and individual health; and Physical 
Education in the Elementary School including 
plays and games, corrective activities, and 

recreation - 4 sem. hrs. 

Nutrition emphasizing the School Lunch Program, 
resources, and helping children with their diet.. 2 sem. hrs. 

Block VI — Professional Education 28 sem. hrs. 

Child Growth and Development 6 sem. hrs. 

Techniques 6 sem. hrs. 

Teaching Reading 
Teaching Arithmetic 

Fundamentals of Elementary Education 8 sem. hrs. 

Supervised Teaching 8 sem. hrs. 

Block VII — General Electives 31 sem. hrs. 

Guidance serves as a basis for choice of electives 



PROVISIONAL HIGH SCHOOL CERTIFICATE 

The Provisional High School Certificate valid for four years 
shall be issued to a person who completes a baccalaureate degree 
for the training of high school teachers. This certificate may be re- 
newed every four years after three years' teaching experience, or 
upon presentation of one-half year of standard college or univer- 
sity work of graduate grade, earned since issuance or last renewal 
of the certificate. If the holder fails to teach the three years re- 
quired for renewal or reissuance, the certificate may be renewed 
or reissued upon 4 semester hours of standard college or univer- 
sity work of graduate grade for each year he fails to teach upon 
the certificate. Upon application to the Department of Education, 
a person shall be issued the Provisional High School Certificate if 
he files a transcript of credits showing the completion of a curric- 
ulum which includes the following courses and standards: 

A. Minimum General and Core Requirements 45 sem. hrs. 

1. English — minimum 12 sem. hrs. 

Including Oral and Written Composition, Literature, 
and Speech (a separate course in speech is not 
required) 

'' 2. Health, Physical Education and Safety — minimum .... 6 sem. hrs. 

3. Group or Field Requirements — ^minimum 27 sem. hrs. 

Each candidate must present not less than 27 
semester hours of credit, distributed among not 
fewer than 3 or more than 4 fields, with not 
fewer than 6 semester hours in any field. Two 
of these groups must be in fields different from 
the major and minors or area of concentration. 
One group may be in the same field but not in 
the same subject as the major or one minor. 



RICHMOND, KENTUCKY 59 



The fields from which the 27 hours of credit may be 
selected are : 

Fine Arts 

Foreign Language 

Mathematics 

Philosophy and Psychology (Courses in Psychology 
submitted in partial fulfillment for professional 
requirements may not be used to satisfy a 
group requirement in this subject) 

Science 

Social Science 

Vocational Subjects (Agriculture, Home Eco- 
nomics, Commerce, Industrial Arts, etc.) 

B. Teaching: Majors and Minors 

1. A major shall require 24 semester hours, except a 

major in English shall require 30 semester hours, 
and a major in Speech and Dramatics shall require 
30 semester hours. 

2. A minor shall require 18 semester hours. 

3. Each curriculum shall require 

(1) an area of concentration, or 

(2) two majors, or 

(3) one major and two minors, or 

(4) one major and one minor when credit in both 
is 48 semester hours (54 when English is in- 
cluded as a major) 

C. Professional Preparation 18 sem. hrs. 

1. student Teaching -- - 8 to 9 hrs. 

The professional requirements for teachers shall 
be 18 semester hours, at least 8 of which shall be 
in student teaching. Practice teaching should 
include actual experience in all phases of a 
teacher's work with a minimum of 144 clock hours 
devoted to the total experiences and with not less 
than 90 clock hours in actual observation, par- 
ticipation, and teaching. . . . Practice teaching 
should be preceded and supplemented by ob- 
servation and other types of experiences with 
children, parents, and teachers in a variety of 
situations. 

2. Other Professional Courses - 9 to 10 hrs. 

There shall be a minimum of 9 semester hours of 
Professional courses in addition to student teaching 
in the following areas: 

a. Child Growth and Development 

b. Fundamentals of Secondary Education 

c. Organization and Administration of the Public 
School System 

D. Completion of a Baccalaureate Degree 



STANDARD HIGH SCHOOL CERTIFICATE 

The Standard High School Certificate valid for five years shall 
be issued to a person who meets the requirements of law and gen- 
eral regulations of the State Board of Education and files a tran- 
script of credits showing the completion of the four-year curric- 
ulum for the training of high school teachers as prescribed by the 
Council on Public Higher Education, and who, in addition thereto, 
completes the requirements for a Master's degree in a standard 
graduate school. 



60 EASTERN STATE COLLEGE 

PROVISIONAL CERTIFICATE IN ADMINISTRATION 
AND SUPERVISION 

The Provisional Certificate in Administration and Supervision 
valid for four years shall be issued to a person who has fulfilled the 
requirements of law and the general regulations of the State Board 
of Education, who has had a minimum of two years' successful 
teaching experience, who has completed a four -year curriculum 
for the training of elementary or high school teachers as approved 
by the State Board of Education, and who presents a transcript of 
standard college credits showing the completion of the following 
courses in Education: 

Courses in Administration and Supervision 9 sem. hrs. 

Courses in Elementary Education 6 sem. hrs. 

Courses in Secondary Education _ 6 sem. hrs. 

The requirements in Administration and Supervision for the 
issuance of the Provisional Certificate in Administration and Super- 
vision shall be approximately as follows: 

General Administration and Supervision — 3 sem. hrs. 

Administration and Supervision of Secondary Schools .. 3 sem. hrs. 
Administration and Supervision of Elementary Schools 3 sem. hrs. 

The Provisional Certificate in Administration and Supervision 
may be renewed after four years upon three years' teaching 
experience during the life of the certificate, or upon presentation 
of one-half year of standard college or university work of graduate 
grade earned since issuance or last renewal. If the holder fails to 
have the three years' exprience during the life of the certificate, 
the certificate may be reissued or renewed upon 6 semester hours 
of standard college or university work of graduate grade for each 
year of experience he fails to obtain. 



STANDARD CERTIFICATE IN ADMINISTRATION 
AND SUPERVISION 

The Standard Certificate in Administration and Supervision 
valid for five years shall be issued to a person who has met the 
requirements for the issuance of the Provisional Certificate in Ad- 
ministration and Supervision and in addition thereto files a trans- 
cript of standard college credits showing the completion of the 
requirements for the Master's degree, with a major in the field of 
administration and supervision, in a standard graduate school. 

The Standard Certificate in Administration and Supervision 
may be extended for life upon presentation of evidence that the 
holder has had three years' successful experience in Administration 
and Supervision during the life of the certificate. If the holder fails 



Richmond, Kentucky 61 

to present the required experience for life extension before the 
certificate expires, the certificate may be reissued or renewed for 
five years upon two years' experience during the life of the cer- 
tificate, or upon 4 semester hours of additional college or university 
work of graduate grade for each of the two years' experience 
he fails to obtain. 



PROVISIONAL CERTIFICATE FOR ATTENDANCE 
OFFICERS 

The Provisional Certificate for Attendance Officers shall be 
issued to a college graduate who holds a legal teaching certificate 
or meets the requirements for such certificate, who has had two 
years of recent experience as a teacher or experience as an 
attendance officer, and who has completed the following minimum 
essential courses: 

Pupil Accounting and Pupil Personnel 3 sem. hrs. 

Social Case Study and Community Organizations 

and Their Work _ - 3 sem. hrs. 

The Provisional Certificate for Attendance Officers shall be 
valid for four years and may be renewed on two years' experience 
or upon 6 semester hours of standard graduate work. 

The Training: Schools. — The campus laboratory schools enroll 
about 350 pupils and have fourteen supervising teachers. The 
organization includes the Elementary Training School of six grades 
located in Cammack Building, the Model High School of six grades 
located in University Building, and the one-room Rural Demonstra- 
tion School of eight grades situated near by on the College farm. 

F^ipils who attend the campus training schools come from the 
city and county in the surrounding community. The number of 
pupils for each grade is limited to thirty. Listed below are the 
annual registration fees in the elementary school and the high 
school: 

Grades 1 to 6 inclusive $ 8.00 

Grades 7 to 12 inclusive 12.00 

Educational philosophy and procedures are learned by teachers 
in training through directed observation and supervised practice. 
The aim is to exemplify in the laboratory schools progressive trends 
in educational practice. 

College students in professional courses and in professionalized 
or special methods courses come into the training schools by 
appointment to observe. A limited number of students preparing 
to meet the requirements for a Provisional Elementary Certificate 
spend a half day in the school observing and participating for 



62 EASTERN STATE COLLEGE 

the semester. The school is used to a limited extent for experimental 
work in which college students generally participate. 

Supervised student teaching is done in the training schools or 
in affiliated public schools. Students wanting to do student teaching 
are expected to file applications several weeks before the semester 
opens. They must have had as much as one semester of resident 
work at Eastern, and all college credits should be on file in the 
Registrar's Office. They must also meet certain standards in general 
scholarship, special academic preparation, use of English, health, 
personality, and professional attitude. 



GENERAL AND PRE-PROFESSIONAL 
CURRICULA 

Special Curricula. — A four-year curriculum in general educa- 
tion is offered. Completion of this curriculum entitles the student 
to receive the baccalaureate degree without right of teaching 
certificate. 

The Institution also offers the courses needed by students who 
are preparing to enter medical schools, colleges of law, colleges of 
engineering, and so on. 

A special curriculum in the field of commerce is offered. This 
curriculum provides adequate training in commerce (accounting, 
general business, and secretarial work) to meet the needs of 
students who desire to enter the field of business. 

Students who take their general and pre-professional work at 
Eastern are able to satisfy the entrance requirements of the lead- 
ing schools of medicine, colleges of law, colleges of engineering, 
and other professional institutions. 

Specific Requirements for Baccalaureate Degrees without Right 
of Certification. — This curriculum is planned to meet the needs of 
those wishing to secure a general education without preparing to 
teach. The work may be planned to meet the requirements for ad- 
mission to schools of medicine, dentistry, law, and other professions. 
Recommended curricula may be secured from the Dean's office or 
from respective heads of departments by those interested in meeting 
given requirements. The minimum requirements are: 

English 101, 102 __ _ 6 hours 

Humanities (English 211, 212, 131, 231. 301, 

and/or Foreign Language) 8 hours 

Library Science 166 _ - - 1 hour 

Physical Education 110 (four semesters) 2 hours 

Science (Biological or Physical) 6 hours 

Social Science - - - 6 hours 

Sociology (Women) 1 hour 

Two majors of 24 hours each, or an area of 48 hours 48 hours 

Elective - 50 hours 

CURRICULUM PREPARATORY FOR MEDICINE 

Eastern offers a preparatory course for the study of medicine 
which, with modifications to meet special variations in require- 
ments, complies with the general entrance requirements of medical 
schools. The curriculum outlined below also includes institutional 
requirements for graduation with a Bachelor of Science degree. 

It is recommended that a student complete the four-year course 
of study at Eastern before transferring to a medical school. This 



64 EASTERN STATE COLLEGE 

gives the student obvious advantages in medical school and in later 
work. Furthermore, some medical schools require* a four-year 
course for admission. 

Students may elect to complete the outlined three years at 
Eastern and then use the first year of work from a Class A medical 
school to complete the requirements for the Bachelor of Science 
degree. Combination courses are subject to approval by Eastern 
and by the particular medical school. 

Students who desire may take only two years for a premedical 
course. Many medical schools will not accept students with only 
two years of premedical training and Eastern does not recommend 
such a limited course. 

SCIENCE— MEDICAL OR SCIENCE— DENTAL 
CURRICULUM 

First Year 

First Semester Hours Second Semester Hours 

Biology 121 5 Biology 122 5 

Chemistry 111 _ 5 Chemistry 112 5 

Enghsh 101 _ _ 3 English 102 3 

Social Science 3 Social Science 3 

16 16 
Second Year 

Biology 242 _._ 5 Biology 347 __ 4 

Chemistry 211 - .-.. 4 Chemistry 212 _ 5 

Mathematics 107 _ 3 Mathematics 113 3 

Physics 131 or 201 5 Physics 132 or 202 5 

17 17 

Third Year 

Biology 481 4 Chemistry 312 .: ; 4 

Chemistry 310 5 Foreign Language 3 

Commerce 230 _ 3 Humanities (Eng. 212) 3 

Foreign Language 3 Psychology 211 3 

Humanities 3 Sociology 331 _ 3 

18 16 
Fourth Year* 

Biology Elective 3 Biology 446 4 

Chemistry 415 _ 5 Elective 12 

Elective 8 

16 16 

Two years of Foreign Language in college are recommended 
or the equivalent in high school. A student may omit Mathematics 
113, Chemistry 211, or Biology 446, or Social Science if necessary 
to take 12 hours in a Foreign Language. 

The courses listed in parentheses are recommended. 



•PLAN H: 

Transfer credits from the regular first year course in a School of 
Medicine or a School of Dentistry. 



RICHMOND, KENTUCKY 65 

MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY 

Students who are interested in becoming medical technicians 
may secure many of the required college courses at Eastern. The 
requirements for this type of work vary and the student should 
elect courses to meet particular requirements. 

PRE-ENGINEERING CURRICULUM 

A student may take one or two years of fundamental work at 
Eastern and then transfer to an engineering college without appre- 
ciable loss of credits if he chooses his courses wisely. The pre- 
professional requirements of a particular college of engineering 
should be chosen from Mathematics, Chemistry, Physics, and other 
basic subjects. Every Pre-Engineering student will receive help, 
upon request, from an advisor. 

PRELAW CURRICULUM 

Students may obtain at Eastern the pre-professional training 
necessary for entrance to any college of law. All standard law 
schools require two years of college work for admission and many 
law schools require three years of college before entrance is 
granted. No special curriculum is prescribed by the Association of 
American Law Schools. Students should take work in English, 
Speech, History, Government, Geography, Accounting, Sociology, 
Economics, and Psychology. 

A student who completes three years of approved Pre-Law 
work at Eastern and transfers credit for the first year of work in 
an accredited law school will be eligible for a Bachelor of Arts 
Degree from Eastern if specific requirements have been met. 

SOCIAL WORK 

Students who plan to do graduate work in social work or who 
plan to enter a field of social work with public or private agencies 
should concentrate on a modified major in the Social Sciences. The 
work should include Economics, Sociology, Psychology, History, 
and such additional areas as are needed for basic preparation. Op- 
portunities for work are increasing in the child welfare, juvenile 
institutions, penal institutions. State social agencies, Federal serv- 
ices, the American Red Cross work, and in similar specialties. 

OTHER PRE-PROFESSIONAL CURRICULA 

The College affords courses for students who plan to do 
specialized work in nursing, library science, theology, and in other 
professional fields. 

In addition to standard four-year pre-professional curricula, 
Eastern may approve specially arranged combined curricula. In 

Eastern — 3 



66 EASTERN STATE COLLEGE 

these curricula, the student completes three years as outlined at 
Eastern to meet basic requirements and then transfers a year of 
successful work from a Grade A professional school in order to 
secure a B. S. or a B. A. Degree from Eastern Kentucky State 
College. This plan may shorten by one year the time needed for 
obtaining both a baccalaureate and a professional degree. 



THE GRADUATE DIVISION 
PURPOSE 

The Graduate Division offers work leading to the degree of 
Master of Arts in Education. The graduate courses in Education 
and in minor areas are offered as part of the regular program of 
the College and are designed to improve classroom instruction and 
school administration. The graduate program is planned to meet the 
needs of teachers in elementary and secondary schools and to pro- 
vide graduate education for school supervisors and administrators. 

TYPES OF STUDENTS 

Graduate courses are open to: (1) students who enter and 
become candidates for the degree of Master of Arts in Education; 
and (2) students who wish to broaden their education without 
reference to a graduate degree. 

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS 

1. Applicants for admission to the Graduate Division must 
hold a bachelor's degree from an institution of recognized stand- 
ing. Students desiring admission to graduate courses should have 
completed the minimum professional requirements for the educa- 
tion of elementary or secondary teachers as prescribed by the 
Council on Public Higher Education in Kentucky. If the holder 
of a baccalaureate degree with less than the minimum professional 
courses desires to work for a Master of Arts degree conditions will 
be determined by the Dean and by an Advisory Committee. 

2. Official credentials should be filed with the Registrar of 
the College before entrance. These credentials must include, (a) 
a complete transcript of high school credits; (b) a complete tran- 
script of college or university credits. If the transcript is not on 
file prior to entrance, admission will be tentative pending receipt 
and review of credentials. 

3. Application for admission to the Graduate Division must 
be filed by a student with the Dean of the Institution. Admission to 
the Graduate Division does not necessarily imply admission to 
candidacy for the degree of Master of Arts in Education. If an 
application for admission or for candidacy is approved, a copy of 
the graduate student's plan of work must be kept on file in the 
Dean's Office. The major professor and/or members of the Advisory 
Committee should be consulted in formulating the program. How- 
ever, the graduate student is expected to show independence in 
planning his program and in study. 



68 EASTERN STATE COLLEGE 

TIME AND WORK REQUIRED 

The student must, (a) complete a minimum of thirty-six weeks 
in resident study; (b) earn a minimum of thirty semester hours; 
and (c) write a thesis in the major field. The thesis requirement 
may be waived provided that the student secures approval from 
the Dean, completes forty-eight weeks in residence, and completes 
a minimum of thirty-six semester hours of credit. 

Transferred credits may not be used to reduce the resident 
work at Eastern to less than two semesters. If the student waives 
the thesis, transferred credit approved by the Dean and the major 
professor may be applied to satisfy the additional credit require- 
ment. 

LOAD 

1. The average graduate student, unless special approval is 
secured from the Dean, should take a load ranging from 12 to 16 
hours per semester with a maximum of 8 hours per summer term. 

2. Part-time graduate students with full-time positions are 
advised to take loads ranging from 2 to 6 hours per semester and 
are expected to meet the high standards prescribed for full-time 
students. 

3. Twelve hours of graduate work earned on a part-time basis 
shall entitle the student to one semester of residence. 

LEVEL OF WORK 

At least fifty per cent of all course work must be in the 
Graduate Division. The remainder of the work may be completed 
in the Upper Division. However, graduate students shall not receive 
credit for work in any course in which students from the Lower 
Division are concurrently enrolled. 

SCHOLARSHIP 

The graduate student must maintain an average standing of 
2.0 and no credit shall be granted for any grade below "C." 

MAJOR AND MINORS 

The candidate for the Master's degree must complete a major 
in the field of Education. A major shall consist of a minimum of 
12 semester hours and a thesis in the major field or of 18 semester 
hours if the student elects to waive the thesis. 

The student must complete a minor or two minors. A minor 
shall consist of a minimum of 8 semester hours. A minor shall be 
determined by the College in terms of the student's needs. Minors 
shall be taken in the Upper Division and/or Graduate Division. 
Minors are offered in the departments of Agriculture, Art, Biology, 



RICHMOND, KENTUCKY 69 

Chemistry, Commerce, English, French, Geography, Health and 
Physical Education, History, Home Economics, Industrial Arts, 
Latin, Mathematics, Music, Physics, and Social Science. 

SEMINAR REQUIREMENTS 

Seminars or research courses are required of graduate students. 
Two types of seminar are provided: (1) for graduate students who 
prepare a Master's thesis and (2) for students who do not prepare 
a thesis. 

THE THESIS 

The thesis should show, among other things, the following 
characteristics: (a) ability of the candidate to work independently 
on an approved problem; (b) a reasonable familiarity with the 
literature of the field of specialization; (c) a practical working 
knowledge of research methods; and (d) conclusions justified by 
supporting data. 

The thesis must conform to regulations approved by the 
Graduate Committee for writing theses. It must be approved by 
the major and minor professors and by the Dean of the College. 

Two typewritten copies of the thesis must be filed in the College 
Library at least one week before the degree is conferred. 

EXAMINATION 

The graduate student shall, upon official notification, pass an 
oral and/or written examination on his major, his minor fields, 
and his thesis. 

APPLICATION FOR DEGREE 

Application for the degree of Master of Arts in Education must 
be filed formally with the Dean of the College not later than the 
tenth week prior to the date on which the degree is to be con- 
ferred. The application should have the approval of the major 
professor and/or the Advisory Committee. 

Formal application for the degree of Master of Arts in Educa- 
tion must be filed with the Registrar with the approval of the Dean 
of the College not later than eight weeks before the degree is to 
be conferred. 




CAMPUS SCENE 
Amphitheater 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

The departments of instruction in the following description of 
courses are arranged in alphabetical order. Schedules are pre- 
pared on the basis of recommended curricula and students who 
follow the recommended curricula will most easily avoid conflicts. 



AGRICULTURE 

(Recommended curriculum for a major in Agriculture with 
right of teaching certificate) 

First Year 

First Semester Hours Second Semester Hours 

Agriculture 125 .- 3 Agriculture 126 3 

Agriculture 131 3 Agriculture 224 3 

Agriculture 211 3 Biology 122 5 

Biology 121 5 English 102 - 3 

English 101 — - 3 Mathematics 120 3 

Physical Education 110 Vz Physical Education 110 V2 

171/2 171/2 

Second Year 

Agriculture 227 .... 3 Agriculture Electives 5 

Agriculture 250 3 Agriculture 223 3 

Chemistry 111 5 Agriculture 251 3 

Health 303 4 Chemistry 112 _.. 5 

Physical Education 110 V2 Physical Education 110 V2 

Elective .'. .— 2 

171/2 I61/2 

Third Year 

Agriculture 243 3 Agriculture 252 — _ 3 

Agriculture 321 3 Agriculture 315 3 

Agriculture 345 3 Agriculture 347 3 

Agriculture Elective 3 Geology 201 — 3 

Commerce 230 3 Humanities and Social Science .. 6 

Elective — 2 

17 18 

Fourth Year 

Agricultural Education Agriculture 441 3 

at University of Agriculture 442 .. 3 

„ , , , . , Agriculture Elective 2 

Kentucky by special Humanities or Social Science -, 3 

arrangement 18 Elective — 5 

* 

16 



RICHMOND, KENTUCKY 73 



AGRICULTURE 

(Recommended curriculum for a major in Agriculture without 
right of teaching certificate) 

First Year 

First Semester Hours Second Semester Hours 

Agriculture 125 3 Agriculture 126 3 

Agriculture 131 3 Agriculture 224 3 

Agriculture 211 3 Biology 122 5 

Biology 121 5 English 102 3 

English 101 3 Mathematics 120 3 

Physical Education 110 V2 Physical Education 110 Vs 

Sociology 100 (Women) 1 

I8V2 nVs 

Second Year 

Agriculture 227 - 3 Agriculture 223 3 

Agriculture 250 3 Agriculture 251 3 

Chemistry 111 5 Agriculture Electives 5 

Health 303 4 Chemistry 112 5 

Physical Education 110 V2 Physical Education 110 _ Vz 

Elective .- 2 

171/2 16^2 

Third Year 

Agriculture 243 3 Agriculture 252 3 

Agriculture 321 3 Agriculture 315 3 

Agriculture 345 3 Agriculture 347 — 3 

Agriculture Elective 3 Geology 201 — - 3 

Commerce 230 3 Humanities and Social Science .. 6 

Elective _ 2 

17~ 18 

Fourth Year 

English Elective _ ._. 3 Agriculture 441 3 

Social Science Elective 3 Agriculture 442 3 

Elective „. _ 10 Agriculture Elective 2 

Social Science or Humanities — 3 
Elective 5 

16~ 16~ 

Recommended Curriculum for a Second Major in 
Agriculture 

A student with a first major in some other department may 
take the following courses for a second major in Agriculture: 126, 
131, 211, 224, 243, 250, 345, 347. 

Recommended Curriculum for a Minor in Agriculture 

A student with a major and a minor in other departments may 
take the following courses for a minor in Agriculture: 126, 211, 224, 
250, 345, 347. 



74 EASTERN STATE COLLEGE 

AGRICULTURE 
LOWER DIVISION COURSES 

Agriculture 125. (Formerly Agriculture 25.) Farm Livestock Produc- 
tion. Three hours. 

Importance and use of livestock products; present types; market classes 
and grades of beef cattle, sheep, swine, horses and mules ; the origin, 
development, and characteristics of the more important breeds. 

Agriculture 126. (Formerly Agriculture 11.) Farm Poultry Production. 
Three hours. 

Types and breeds of poultry; poultry houses; balanced rations; poultry 
diseases; egg production; culling; meat production; parasites; grading and 
marketing of poultry products. 

Agriculture 131. (Formerly Agriculture 12.) General Horticulture. Three 
hours. 

The farm garden and small fruits; hot bed and cold frame management; 
vegetable storage; garden planning; seed selection. 

Agriculture 200. Apiculture. Two hours. 

Lecture and laboratory. 

The anatomy of the honey bee; the colony; location and equipment of 
the apiary; production of comb and extracted honey; diseases and enemies 
of bees ; observation and manipulation of beekeeping equipment. 

Agriculture 211. (Formerly Agriculture 20.) Farm Crops. Three hours. 
Cereal and forage crops; pasture management; weed control; crop rota- 
tion; seed testing; inoculation; tillage; tillage tools and implements. 

Agriculture 223. (Formerly Agriculture 21.) Farm Dairying. Three hours. 

Milk as a food; market milk; milk sanitation; dairy inspection; 
bacteriology of milk; scoring milk and cream ; laboratory tests for various 
dairy products; production costs; pasteurization; refrigeration. 

Agriculture 224. (Formerly Agriculture 22.) Dairy Cattle Management. 
Three hours. 

Dairy cattle breeds; judging; feeding ; calf raising; pedigrees; production 
testing; dairy barn construction ; equipment. 

Agriculture 227. (Formerly Agriculture 44.) Beef Production. Three 
hours. 

History and importance of the beef cattle industry; selection ; breeding ; 
feeding; management of beef cattle. 

Agriculture 228. (Formerly Agriculture 26.) Pork Production. Three 
hours. 

Types and breeds of swine; selection; breeding; feeding; disease control; 
home slaughter of pork. 

Agriculture 243. (Formerly Sociology 14.) Rural Sociology. Three hours. 

Historical backgrounds ; movements, resources, and problems of rural 
communities; rural-urban relationships; rural people; problems of rural 
youth; agriculture and its problems of adjustment; community organizations 
and institutions; adult education; public health; rural recreation; social wel- 
fare; community organization and local government; relationship of the 
school to other institutions and agencies of the rural community; location 
and use of educational materials and resources of the commoxdty;, state and 
national policies for the improvement of rural society. 



RICHMOND, KENTUCKY 75 



Agriculture 250. (Formerly Agriculture 23.) Farm Shop. Three hours. 
Care and repair of farm tools; tool grinding; soldering; painting; concrete 
work; shop exercises in the construction of farm equipment. 

Agriculture 251. (Formerly Agriculture 24.) Farm Shop : Engineering. 
Three hours. 

Farm buildings, construction and repair; farm surveying; drainage ; 
terracing; farm plats ; exercises involving the use of the transit and level. 

Agriculture 252. Farm Shop : Farm Mechanics. Three hours. 

Selection and care of farm machinery; electric motors; power trans- 
mission; care and repair of electric equipment in the' home and on the 
farm. 

Agriculture 282. (Formerly Industrial Arts 27.) Arc and Oxyacetelene 
Welding. Two hours. 

Practice in the basic welding processes; horizontal, incline, and over- 
head welding; characteristics of metals. Fee, |1.50. 



UPPER DIVISION COURSES 

(Open to Junior, Senior, and Graduate Students) 

Agriculture 304. (Formerly Health 31.) Bacteriology of Dairy and Food 
Products. Five hours. 

Prerequisite: Health 303. 

Control of microorganisms in dairy and food products; bacterial analysis 
of dairy and food products ; sanitation on the farm. 

Agriculture 315. (Formerly Agriculture 30.) Soils. Three hours. 
Prerequisites: Two semesters of general chemistry. 

Soil composition; soil conservation; soil microorganisms; humus; soil 
water; soil minerals; lime; commercial fertilizers; soil analysis; soil erosion. 

Agriculture 321. (Formerly Agriculture 31.) Principles of Animal Nutri- 
tion. Three hours. 

Prerequisites : Two semesters of general chemistry. 

Origin and composition of livestock feeds; digestion and assimilation; 
balanced rations; minerals; feed costs; feeding young animals; feeding grow- 
ing animals; finished feeding, etc. 

Agriculture 325. (Formerly Biology 35.) Genetics. Three hours. 

The elementary principles of heredity and their relationship to plant and 
animal breeding; the chromosome theory of heredity; linkage; crossing over; 
interference; biometrics. Fee, $1.50. 

Agriculture 343. (Formerly Biology 37.) Economic Entomology. Three 
hours. 

Taxonomy of insects; anatomy and physiology of insects; life histories; 
economic importance; methods of control; collection of important insects. 
Fee, $1.50. 

Agriculture 345. (Formerly Agriculture 32.) Farm Management. Three 
hours. 

Personal characteristics desirable to successful farming; cost, of produc- 
tion; living costs; profits; types of farming; soil productivity; livestock 
problems; farm labor; farm rent; farm equipment; farm layout. 



76 EASTERN STATE COLLEGE 



Agriculture 346. (Formerly Agriculture 42.) Agricultural Journalism. 
Three hours. 

Livestock advertising; sales letters; news letters; minute recording; 
feature articles; survey of agricultural journals; editorial writing. 

Agriculture 347. (Formerly Agriculture 33.) Farm Accounting. Three 
hours. 

The fundamental principles of accounting applied to farm accounts; 
financial statements; depreciation of inventories; production costs. 

Agriculture 350. Livestock Hygiene. Three hours. 

Prerequisites: Health 303 and Agriculture 304. 

The prevention and control of common diseases of farm livestock; 
sanitation; dispersal of pathogens; external parasites. 

Agriculture 352. (Formerly Agriculture 34.) Farm Motors. Three hours. 

A study of the fundamental principles governing the selection, con- 
struction, operation and care of motors, tractors, and tractor equipment for 
farm use. 

Agriculture 440. Soil Conservation. Three hours. 

Conservation of soils and their fertility; erosion and control; soil de- 
terioration and human welfare. 

Agriculture 441. (Formerly Agriculture 41.) Agricultural Economics. 
Three hours. 

The problems of economics as applied to agriculture; a study of the 
agricultural industry from historic, geographic, and economic approaches. 

Agriculture 442. Marketing. Three hours. 

A study of the problems involved in marketing farm produce; country 
livestock markets; classes and functions of middlemen; grading and 
standardizing; wholesaling and retailing; transportation and storage; 
financing; prices; speculation; co-operative markets. 

Agriculture. Special Problems. One hour. 

Available to qualified students, by special arrangement. 

A study Involving original investigation and research. 




ARTS BUILDING 



78 EASTERN STATE COLLEGE 



ART 

(Recommended curriculum for a major in Art with right of 
teaching certificate) 

First Year 

First Semester Hours Second Semester Hours 

Art 117 -- 3 Art 118 3 

English 101 3 English 102 3 

History 141 3 History 142 3 

Physical Education 110 V2 Library Science 166 1 

Science 109 or 111 3 Physical Education 110 V2 

Sociology 100 (Women) 1 Science 110 or 112 3 

Elective 3 Elective _. _ 3 

I6V2 leii 

Second Year 

Art 200 2 Art 201 or 202 3 

English 211 3 Art 217 _ _. 2 

Industrial Arts 100 3 Art 260 3 

Industrial Arts 191 3 English 212 3 

Physical Education 110 - — V2 Music 171 — 3 

Physical Education 225 2 Physical Education 110 i,i 

Elective 3 Elective 3 

I61/2 n\{t 

Third Year 

Art 390 - 3 Art 322 _ 3 

Education 211 — 3 Elective — ; 13 

Health 201 -. - 3 

Elective 8 

17 16 

Fourth Year 

Art 361 or 461 3 Education 364 6 

Elective -13 Education 463 10 

16 16 

Recommended Curriculum for a Second Major in Art 

A student with a first major in some other department may- 
take the following courses for a second major in Art: 117, 118, 200, 
201 or 202, 217, 260, 390, 322, 361 or 461. 

Recommended Curriculum for a Minor in Art 

A student with a major and a minor in other departments may 
take the following courses for a minor in Art: 117, 118, 200, 201 or 
202, 322, 390, and 2 hours elective. 



RICHMOND, KENTUCKY 79 

ART 
LOWER DIVISION COURSES 

Art 117. (Formerly Art 10.) Elementary Drawing and Design. Three 
hours. 

Introductory contact with the nature and practice of art and with basic 
knowledges and skills in drawing, design, and color; an essential foundation 
course for the art major, the elementary education major, and the home 
economics major. Media used are pencil, tempera, water color, and colored 
chalks. 

Art 118. (Formerly Art 11.) Art Media. Three hours. 

Prerequisite: Art 117, or a similar course in introductory art. 

Designed to meet individual needs and abilities in a variety of problems 
in landscape, still life and figure drawing; media — charcoal, pen and ink, 
pastels, water color, tempera, pencil and oils. 

Art 200. (Formerly Art 22.) Art Appreciation: Orientation. Two hours. 

Designed to establish a basis for judgment and good taste in the con- 
sideration and use of art in daily living through the study of examples of 
architecture, sculpture, painting, weaving, the art of the book, and ceramics. 

Art 201. (Formerly Art 20.) Drawing, Painting, and Composition. Three 
hours. 

Prerequisite: Art 117. 

Technical skill and creative ability in the use of charcoal, pastels, oils, 
and water colors; study of still life; outdoor sketching; figure composition; 
artistic anatomy. 

Art 202. (Formerly Art 21.) Modeling and Design. Three hours. 

Prerequisite: Art 117. 

Creative experience in three dimensional composition given for the pur- 
pose of developing a stronger sense of plastic form; objects molded by 
hand, and on the potter's wheel. 

Art 217. (Formerly Art 23.) Lettering and Poster Design. Two hours. 
Development of ability to apply art principles in the production of hand 
lettering; lettering structure; spacing; poster design. 

Art 218. Advertising Lettering and Commercial Design. Two hours. 

Prerequisite: Art 217. 

Designed to meet the needs of those who wish to pursue lettering as a 
commercial phase of art; survey of reproduction methods; problems in block 
printing and silk screen; folders and advertising layout. 

Art 219. (Formerly Art 29.) Design. Two hours. 

A course emphasizing the theory of design in the mediums of wood, 
paper, and thread. Formal drill in the main elements of design to meet the 
needs of the student who wishes to become more efficient in creative and 
structural design. 

Art 220. (Formerly Art 24.) Problems in Interior Design. Two hours. 

Prerequisite: Art 117. 

A survey of the principles of design in all interiors; art elements- 
color, form, and line in furniture and furnishings; problems in house plans 
and blueprint reading. 



80 EASTERN STATE COLLEGE 



Art 221. (Formerly Art 25.) Fashion Illustration. Two hours. 

Prerequisite: Art 117. 

Problems designed to develop the student's abiUty to represent the 
costume in different art media and to help him understand technical prob- 
lems of fashion illustration; commercial layouts; readings in the history of 
costume. 

Art 227. (Formerly Art 27.) Applied Design. Three hours. 
Prerequisite: Art 219. 
Development of craftsmanship in the use of design as applied to weaving, 
enanieling, leather tooling, stenciling, linoleum cuts, and needle work. 

Art 228. (Formerly Art 28.) Advanced Applied Design. Three hours. 

Prerequisite: Art 227. 

This course emphasizes design in weaving, advanced leather tooling, and 
linoleum block printing. Rugs and table niats are woven from waste and 
commercial materials on the various looms, such as card, tack, and large 
two- and four-heddle types. 

Art 260. (Formerly Art 26.) Public School Art. Three hours. 

Designed to meet the needs of the classroom teacher in understanding the 
place of art in the general curriculum of the elementary school by correla- 
tion and integration, and by appreciation as a special subject. Problems are 
used to develop art skills, and to enable the teacher to understand the 
interests and abilities of the child. 



UPPER DIVISION COURSES 

(Open to Junior, Senior, and Graduate Students) 

Art 321. (Formerly Art 30.) Drawing and Illustration. Three hours. 

Prerequisite : Art 117. 

Creative skill in drawing and illustration of ideas; specific study of 
perspective; pictorial composition; illustration of stories; murals; media — 
pencil, charcoal, water color, and ink. 

Art 322. (Formerly Art 31.) Color and Design. Three hours. 
Prerequisite : Art 117. 

Technical practice in design; decorative rendering; practice in the mak- 
ing of folders; color theory. 

Art 361. (Formerly Art 36.) Art Education in the Elementary School. 
Three hours. 

Prerequisites: Art 117 and 260. 

Designed to give teachers a knowledge of the theory and practice of art 
in their school problems and to give opportunity to work out art projects in 
the various media; unit planning; materials and methods. 

Art 390. (Formerly Art 33.) Art Appreciation: Survey. Three hours. 

A survey of architecture, sculpture, painting, and the minor arts; art of 
the Near East; classical art; medieval art; Renaissance art; post-Renaissance 
art; art in the United States; primitive art; Oriental art. 

Art 421. (Formerly Art 40.) Advanced Drawing, Painting and Design. 
Three hours. 

Studio practice in drawing, painting and design; orchestration of colors; 
research in artist's media — charcoal, pastel, oil, and water color. 



RICHMOND, KENTUCKY 81 



Art 422. (Formerly Art 41.) Advanced Pictorial Composition. Three 
hours. 

Painting from nature; field trips; studio criticism; creative design 
problems in decorative landscape and figure composition — pencil, pastel, 
water color, oil, and tempera. 

Art 423. (Formerly Art 42.) Art Appreciation: Architecture and 
Sculpture. Three hours. 

Prerequisite : Art 390. 

Achievements in architecture and sculpture of the following periods: 
Prehistoric, preclassical, Greek, Roman, Early Christian, Byzantine, 
Romanesque, Gothic, Renaissance, American, and contemporary. 

Art 424. (Formerly Art 43.) Art Appreciation: Painting. Three hours. 
Prerequisite: Art 390. 

Great periods and masters of painting: Italian, Flemish, German, Spanish, 
Dutch, English, French, and American. 

Art 461. (Formerly Art 46.) The Arts in the High School. Three hours. 

Prerequisites: Art 117 and 260. 

Survey of art in the secondary schools for the purpose of examining the 
theories and practices in the rural and city high schools. Practice in planning 
units and courses of study which will give an understanding of our heritage 
in the arts, and an appreciation of art in daily living. 

Art 462. Art Appreciation: Art Principles. Two hours. 

Prerequisite: Art 424. 

Designed for the study of aesthetic standards in architectural, sculptural 
and pictorial composition; current art principles; taste and evaluation; 
analysis of selected examples of art. 



82 EASTERN STATE COLLEGE 



BIOLOGY 

(Recommended Curriculum for the Training of Teachers of the 
Sciences with right of Teaching Certificate) 

First Year 

First Semester Hours Second Semester Hours 

Biology 121 _ 5 Biology 122 5 

Chemistry 111 — 5 Chemistry 112 5 

English 101 3 English 102 3 

Mathematics 107 3 Library Science 166 1 

Physical Education 110 1/2 Mathematics 113 3 

Sociology 100 (Women) 1 Physical Education 110 V2 

171/2 171/2 

Second Year 

Biology 229 - _ 3 Biology 325 3 

English 211 3 English 212 __.. 3 

History 141 or 202 3 History 142 or 203 „ 3 

Physical Education 110 V2 Physical Education 110 Vz 

Physics 201 5 Physics 202 5 

Elective -.. 3 Elective 2 

171/2 I61/2 

Third Year 

Biology 335 2 Biology 345 -- - -— - 2 

Chemistry 310 5 Chemistry 212 5 

Geology 201 3 Education' 211 _ 3 

Physics - 3 Physics 3 

Science 471 2 Science 410 — 2 

Elective - 2 Elective 2 

17 17 

Fourth Year 

Health 201 3 Education 364 6 

Physical Education 225 .-- 2 Education 463 10 

Physics 3 

Elective 9 

17 16 

Physics must be chosen by the student with the approval of the 
head of the department. Physics 131, 132 and 203 may be substi- 
tuted for Physics 201 and 202. 



RICHMOND, KENTUCKY 83 



BIOLOGY 

(Recommended curriculum for a major in Biology with right 
of teaching certificate) 

First Year 

First Semester Hours Second Semester Hours 

Biology 121 5 Biology 122 5 

English 101 _ 3 English 102 3 

Mathematics 107 3 Library Science 166 1 

Physical Education 110 Vz Mathematics 113 3 

Social Science 3 Physical Education .110 1/2 

Sociology 100 (Women) __. 1 Social Science 3 

Elective 2 Elective : 2 

171/2 171/2 

Second Year 

Biology 242 5 Biology 229 3 

Chemistry 111 5 Biology 335 2 

English 211 _ _ .._ 3 Chemistry 112 5 

Physical Education 110 1/2 English 212 3 

Elective 3 Physical Education 110 V2 

Elective _ 3 

I6V2 161/2 

Third Year 

Biology 336 2 Biology 345 2 

Education 211 3 Biology 325 3 

Physics 131 or 201 5 Physics 132 or 202 5 

Elective 6 Elective _ 6 

16~ 16 

Fourth Year 

Biology 343 3 Education 364 6 

Health 201 3 Education 463 10 

Physical Education 225 2 

Science 471 2 

Elective 6 

16~ 16 

Recommended Curriculum for a Second Major in Biology 

With right of teaching certificate. — A student with a first 
major in some other department may take the following courses 
for a second major in Biology: Biology 121, 122, 229, 325, 335, 345, 
and 4 hours elective. 

Recommended Curriculum for a Minor in Biology 

A student with a major and a minor in other departments may 
take the following courses for a minor in Biology: Biology 121, 122, 
and 8 hours elective. 

Elect courses for a second major or minors and for group or field 
requirements. 



84 EASTERN STATE COLLEGE 



BIOLOGY 

(Recommended curriculum for a major in Biology without right 
of teaching certificate) 

First Year 

First Semester Hours Second Semester Hours 

Biology 121 5 Biology 122 5 

English 101 3 English 102 3 

Mathematics 107 3 Library Science 166 1 

Physical Education 110 Vz Mathematics 113 3 

Social Science 3 Physical Education 110 Vz 

Sociology 100 (Women) 1 Social Science 3 

Elective 2 Elective ._. 2 

171/2 171/2 

Secand Year 

Biology Elective 5 Biology Elective 5 

Chemistry 111 5 Chemistry 112 5 

English 211 or English 212 or 

Modern Language 3 Modern Language 3 

Physical Education 110 V2 Physical Education 110 Vz 

Elective 3 Elective .;.:::.. 3 

I6I/2 16^2 

Third Year 

Biology Elective 3 Biology Elective 3 

Physics 131 or 201 5 Physics 132 or 202 5 

Elective 8 English 131 or 212 3 

Elective 5 



16 16 

Fourth Year 

Elective .-. 16 Elective 16 

Recommended Curriculum for a Second Major in Biology 

Without right of teaching certificate. — A student with a first 
major in some other department may take the following courses 
for a second major in Biology: Biology 121, 122, and 14 hours 
elective. 



Elect courses for a second major or minors. 



RICHMOND, KENTUCKY 85 

BIOLOGY 
LOWER DIVISION COURSES 

Biology 121. (Formerly Biology 12 and 20.) General Botany. Five hours. 

Biology of plants. An Introductory study of the structure, physiology, 
ecology and phylogeny of plants, with emphasis on basic biological principles. 
Three lecture and four laboratory hours. Fee, $1.50. 

Biology 122. (Formerly Biology 11.) Biology of Animals. Five hours. 

General Zoology. An introductory study of the structure, physiology, 
ecology, phylogeny and economics of animals, with emphasis on basic 
biological principles. Three lecture and four laboratory hours. Fee, $1.50. 

Biology 219. (Formerly Biology 29 and 29h.) Physiology. Three hours. 

Offered for home economic students and for students who have not had 
Science 111 or 112, or Biology 122. 

Fundamental principles of human physiology, with emphasis on the 
functioning of the circulatory, respiratory, digestive and excretory systems. 
Two lecture and two laboratory hours. Fee, $1.50. 

Biology 225. (Formerly Biology 25.) Applied Anatomy. Three hours. 

Prerequisites: Science 111 and 112, or Biology 122. 

Anatomy of the human body, with emphasis on the skeleton, muscles and 
nervous system and their function in physical exercise. One lecture and four 
laboratory hours. Fee, $1.50. 

Biology 229. (Formerly Biology 29.) Human Physiology. Three hours. 

Prerequisite: Science 111 and 112, or Biology 122. 

Fundamental principles of human physiology, with emphasis on the 
functioning of the circulatory, respiratory, digestive and excretory systems. 
Two lecture and two laboratory hours. Fee, $1.50. 

Biology 242. (Formerly Biology 27 and 28.) Comparative Anatomy. Five 
hours. 

Prerequisite: Biology 122. 

Chordate characteristics and taxonomy; comparative anatomy of the 
principal organ systems: emphasis in laboratory upon lower chordate, fish, 
amphibian, bird and cat. Three lecture and four laboratory hours. Fee, $1.50. 

UPPER DIVISION COURSES 

(Open to Junior, Senior, and Graduate Students) 
Biology 325. (Formerly Biology 35.) Genetics. Three hours. 
Prerequisite: Science 112 or Biology 121 or 122. 

Laws governing inheritance, variations and evolution in plants, animals 
and man; the role of heredity in the improvement of cultivated plants, 
domesticated animals and the human race. Three lecture hours. 

Biology 332. (Formerly Biology 21.) Plant Morphology. Three hours. 

Prerequisite: Biology 121. 

A comparative morphology of the plant phyla. Two lecture and three 
laboratory hours. Fee, $1.50. 

Biology 334. (Formerly Biology 32.) Plant Physiology. Three hours. 

Prerequisite: Biology 121. 

A study of the chemical, physical and biological processes which occur in 
vascular plants. Two lecture and three laboratory hours. Fee, $1.50. 

Biology 335. (Formerly Biology 30.) Local Flora. Two hours. 
Prerequisite: Biology 121. 

The identification, classification and phylogeny of vascular plants; prin- 
ciple of taxonomy; field trips required. Four laboratory hours. Fee, $1.50. 



86 EASTERN STATE COLLEGE 



Biology 336. (Formerly Biology 31.) Woody Plants. Two hours. 
The identification and classification of local trees and shrubs; key con- 
struction. Four laboratory hours. Fee, $1.50. 

Biology 343, (Formerly Biology 37.) Economic Entomology. Three hours. 

Prerequisite: Biology 122. 

Taxonomy, identification, life histories, physiology, economic importance, 
methods of control and collection of insects, with emphasis on local forms. 
One lecture and four laboratory hours. Fee, $1.50. 

Biology 344. (Formerly Biology 38.) Bird Study. One hour. 
Taxonomy, identification, habits and economic importance of birds, with 
emphasis on field observation of local species. Two laboratory hours. 

Biology 345. Field Zoology. Two hours. 

Taxonomy, identification, habits and economic importance of local 
animals, with emphasis on vertebrates. Four laboratory hours. Fee, $1.50. 

Biology 347. (Formerly Biology 47.) Embryology. Four hours. 

Prerequisite : Biology 242. 

Detailed study of the embryology of the starfish, frog, and chicken, with 
some consideration of mammalian embryology. Two lecture and four laboratory 
hours. Fee, $1.50. 

Biology 433. Economic Plants. Two hours. 

Prerequisite: Biology 121. 

The economic importance of plants and plant products; the utility of 
plants in relation to wood products, textiles, foods, condiments, beverages, 
drugs, poisons ; the role of plants in ornamentation, conservation and world 
events. Two lecture hours. 

Biology 441. (Formerly Biology 44.) Invertebrate Zoology. Four hours. 
Prerequisite: Biology 122. 

Characteristics, life histories, taxonomy, ecology and evolution of the 
invertebrates. Two lecture and four laboratory hours. Fee, $1.50. 

Biology 444. (Formerly Biology 45.) Parasitology. Three hours. 

Prerequisite: Biology 122. 

The morphology, life histories, epidemology and methods of diagnosis and 
control of animal parasites, with emphasis upon those of man and 
domesticated animals. Two lecture and three laboratory hours. Fee, $1.50. 

Biology 446. (Formerly Biology 46.) Histology. Four hours. 

Prerequisite: Biology 242. 

The histology of permanent animal tissues ; the technique of the prepara- 
tion of animal tissues for microscopic study. Two lecture and four laboratory 
hours. Fee, $1.50. 

Biology 481. (Formerly Biology 48.) Animal Physiology. Four hours. 
Prerequisite: Biology 242. 

Detailed study of the chemistry and physics of the physiological activities 
of animals. Two lecture and four laboratory hours. Fee, $1.50. 

GRADUATE DIVISION COURSE 

Biology 511. Advanced Biology. Three hours. 

Prerequisite: A major or minor in biology and permission of instructor. 
Individual study in fields of biology which are in advance of the work 
offered on the undergraduate level. 



RICHMOND, KENTUCKY 87 



CHEMISTRY 

(Recommended curriculum for the training of teachers of the 
Sciences with right of teaching certificate) 

First Year 

First Semester Hours Second Semester Hours 

Biology 121 _ 5 Biology 122 : 5 

Chemistry 111 5 Chemistry 112 __ 5 

English 101 _„ __ 3 English 102 -3 

Mathematics 107 3 Library Science 166 1 

Physical Education 110 Vz Mathematics 113 3 

Sociology 100 (Women) 1 Physical Education 110 Vz 

171/2 171/2 

Second Year 

Biology 229 3 Biology 325 _ 3 

English 211 3 English 212 3 

History 141 or 202 3 History 142 or 203 3 

Physical Education 110 1,2 Physical Education 110 \'2 

Physics 201 5 Physics 202 _ 5 

Elective _ _ 3 Elective _ __ 2 

171/2 I61/2 

Third Year 

Biology 335 2 Biology 345 2 

Chemistry 310 __ 5 Chemistry 212 5 

Geology 201 : 3 Education 211 3 

Physics Elective 3 Physics Elective 3 

Science 471 2 Science 410 — 2 

Elective _ _ 2 Elective - 2 

vT 17 

Fourth Year 

Health 201 - 3 Education 364 6 

Physical Education 225 2 Education 463 10 

Physics Elective 3 

Elective 9 

vT 16~ 

Physics must be chosen by the student with the approval of the head of 
the department. Physics 131, 132, and 203 may be substituted for Physics 201 
and 202. 



EASTERN STATE COLLEGE 



CHEMISTRY 

(Recommended curriculum for a major in Chemistry with right 
of teaching certificate) 

First Year 

First Semester Hours Second Semester Hours 

Biology 121 5 Biology 122 - 5 

Chemistry 111 5 Chemistry 112 5 

English 101 3 English 102 3 

Physical Education 110 — 1/2 Library Science 166 1 

Social Science — 3 Mathematics 107 3 

Sociology 100 (Women) 1 Physical Education 110 \'2 

171/2 17»/2 

Second Year 

Chemistry 211 4 Chemistry 212 5 

Mathematics 113 3 Physical Education 110 V2 

Physical Education 110 1/2 Physics 132 or 202 5 

Physics 131 or 201 5 Social Science 3 

Electives 4 Elective 3 

161/2 I6V2 

Third Year 

Chemistry 310 5 Education 211 3 

Chemistry 415 5 English 212 3 

English 211 3 Science 410 2 

Electives _ 3 Electives 8 

16 16 

Fourth Year 

Physical Education 225 2 Education 364 6 

Health 201 3 Education 463 10 

Electives 11 

16 16 



Recommended Curriculum for a Second Major 

A student with a first major in some other department may 
take the following courses for a second major in Chemistry: Chem- 
istry 111, 112, 211, 212, 310. 

Recommended Curriculum for a Minor in Chemistry 

A student with a major and a minor in other departments may 
take the following courses for a minor in Chemistry: Chemistry 
111, 112, 211, 212. 



Elect courses for a second major or minors and for group or field re- 
quirements. 



RICHMOND, KENTUCKY 89 



CHEMISTRY 

(Recommended curriculum for a major in Chemistry without 
right of teaching certificate) 

First Year 

First Semester Hours Second Semester Hours 

Chemistry 111 5 Chemistry 112 5 

English 101 3 Commerce 151 2 

History 141 _ 3 English 102 3 

Library Science 166 1 History 142 3 

Mathematics 107 .— 3 Mathematics 108 2 

Physical Education 110 Vz Mathematics 113 3 

Physics 107 __ 1 Physical Education 110 Vz 

Sociology 100 (Women) 1 

171/2 18»/2 

Second Year 

Biology 121 5 Biology 122 — 5 

Chemistry 211 4 Chemistry 212 5 

English 211 3 English 212 _ 3 

Mathematics 232 5 Mathematics 251 5 

Physical Education 110 1/2 Physical Education 110 Vz 

nV2 18 1/2 

Third Year 

Chemistry 310 5 Chemistry 312 4 

Foreign Language 3 Commerce 230 3 

Mathematics 352 4 Foreign Language _ 3 

Physics 201 5 Physics 202 -- - 5 

17~" 15~ 

Fourth Year 

Chemistry 320 3 Chemistry 416 - 5 

Chemistry 415 5 Physics Elective 3 

Physics Elective 3 Elective -- 8 

Elective _ 5 

16~ 16~ 



90 EASTERN STATE COLLEGE 

CHEMISTRY 
LOWER DIVISION COURSES 

Chemistry 111. (Formerly Chemistry 11.) General Chemistry. Five hours. 

The fundamental theories and laws of inorganic chemistry ; the prepara- 
tion, properties, and uses of the more common elements and their compounds; 
explanation of chemical symbolism. Three lecture and four laboratory hours. 
Fee, $1.50. 

Chemistry 112. (Formerly Chemistry 13.) General Chemistry. Five hours. 

Continuation of the laws and theories of inorganic chemistry; study of 
organic chemistry, electro-chemistry, and the metals. Three lecture and four 
laboratory hours. Fee, $1.50. 

Chemistry 211. (Formerly Chemistry 21 and 22.) Qualitative Analysis. 
Four hours. 

Prerequisites : Chemistry 111 and 112. 

Reactions of cations and anions; solutions; equilibrium; oxidation and 
reduction; hydrogen-ion concentration and pH; complex-ion forrriatibn. Two 
lecture and four laboratory hours. Fee, $1.50. 

Chemistry 212. (Formerly Chemistry 23 and 24.) Quantitative Analysis. 
Five hours. 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 211. 

The principles and use of the analytical balance ; care and use of 
analytical equipment ; preparation of solutions, quantitative and qualitative ; 
solubility product and laws of precipitation and solution; principles of 
stoichiometry; quantitative determinations of common metals and nonmetals 
by gravimetric, volumetric and electrolytic methods. Two lecture and six 
laboratory hours. Fee, $1.50. 

Chemistry 220. (Formerly Chemistry 20.) Bio-organic Chemistry. Four 
hours. 

(Open only to majors in home economics.) 

Prerequisites: Chemistry 111 and 112. 

A study of the applications of organic chemistry to food, nutrition and 
other problems in home economics. Two lecture and four laboratory hours. 
Fee, $1.50. 

UPPER DIVISION COURSES 

(Open to Junior, Senior, and Graduate Students) 

Chemistry 310. (Formerly Chemistry 26 and 27.) Organic Chemistry. 
Five hours. 

Prerequisites : Chemistry 111 and 112. 

Methane series and derivatives; ethylene series and derivatives; 
acetylene series and derivatives; polycyclic compounds; glucids, lipids, pro- 
tids, and related compounds. Three lecture and four laboratory hours. Fee, 
$1.50. 

Chemistry 312. (Formerly Chemistry 28.) Advanced Organic Chemistry. 
Four hours. 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 310. 

Aromatic hydrocarbons, aldehydes; phenols, amines, diazonium com- 
pounds; dyes, drugs, etc. ; theory of color, molecular rearrangements, 
tautomerism, etc. Two lecture and four laboratory hours. Fee, $1.50. 



RICHMOND, KENTUCKY 91 



Chemistry 313. (Formerly Chemistry 34.) Biochemistry. Five hours. 
Prerequisite : Chemistry 310. 
' Quahtative tests for digested substances in vivo and in vitreo; chemical 
nature of muscle, blood and bone; enzyme action; urine analysis. Three 
lecture and four laboratory hours. Fee, $1.50. 

Chemistry 320. (Formerly Chemistry 411 and 25.) Advanced Quantitative 
Analysis. Three hours. 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 212. 

Analysis of ores; potentiometric determinations; the principle and use 
of the colorimeter and polarimeter; gas analysis; water analysis; soil analysis; 
combustion train. Six laboratory hours. Fee, $1.50. 

Chemistry 415. (Formerly Chemistry 41.) Physical Chemistry. Five 
hours. 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 212. 

The nature of the gaseous, liquid and solid states ; thermo-chemistry and 
thermodynamics; solutions; colloids. Three lecture and four laboratory hours. 
Fee, $1.50. 

Chemistry 416. (Formerly Chemistry 42.) Physical Chemistry. Five 
hours. 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 415. 

Continuation of Chemistry 415. Chemical equilibria; phase rule; chemical 
kinetics; electrochemistry; ionic equilibria; atomic and molecular structure. 
Three lecture and four laboratory hours. Fee, $1.50. 

Chemistry 430. (Formerly Chemistry 49.) Problems in Chemistry. Three 
hours. 

Prerequisite : Senior standing in chemistry and departmental approval. 

Research in inorganic, organic, analytical, physical or biochemical 
problems. Six laboratory hours. Fee, $1.50. 



92 EASTERN STATE COLLEGE 



COMMERCE 

(Recommended curriculum for a major in the area of Com- 
merce with right of teaching certificate) 

First Year 

First Semester^ Hours Second Semester Hours 

Commerce 100 3 Commerce 119 ;*. 3 

Commerce 131 1 Commerce 152 2 

Commerce 151 2 English 102 _.. 3 

English 101 3 Health 100 2 

Physical Education 110 V2 Library Science 166 1 

Science 109 or 111 - 3 Physical Education 110 Va 

Social Science 100 .k 3 Science 110 or 112 3 

Sociology 100 (Women) : 1 Social Science 101 ..., 3 

I61/2 17% 

Second Year 

Commerce 120 •. 3 Commerce 221 3 

Commerce 215 '. 3 Commerce 216^ _ 3 

Commerce 253 _ 2 English 212 3 

Commerce 280 1 Health 201 3 

English 211 3 History 142 3 

History 141 3 Physical Education 110 % 

Physical Education 110 Yz Elective 2 

Elective 1 or 2 



161/2 or 171/2 17>/a 

Third Year 

Commerce 230 _.. 3 Commerce 231 3 

Commerce 302 3 Commerce 309 3 

Commerce 405 3 Commerce 461a 2 

Education 211 3 Commerce Elective 3 

Physical Education 225 2 Education 383 - 3 

♦Elective 3 •*Gen. Educ. Elective 3 

17 17 

Fourth Year 

Commerce 461b 2 Education 364 6 

Commerce (Gen. Business) Education 463 10 

Elective 7 

Elective 7 or 8 



16 or 17 16 

A student with a major in some other department may take a 
major in Commerce with emphasis in Secretarial Practice, General 
Business, or Accounting. For the Secretarial Practice major the 
following courses are required: 131, 151, 152, 215, 216, 230, 253, 302, 
461a, and 5 hours elective. For the General Business major the 
following courses are required: 100, 119, 120, 151, 221, 230, 231, 309, 
405, 461b. For the Accounting major the following courses are re- 
quired: 119, 120, 151, 221, 230, 231, 309 or 405, 461b, and 5 hours 
elective in Accounting. 



* Selection should be made from the fields of Fine Arts, Foreign 
Language, Mathematics, Agriculture, Home Economics, and Industrial Arts. 

** The student should select a subject in the same field as that selected 
for the General Education elective in the first semester of this year. 



RICHMOND, KENTUCKY 93 



COMMERCE 

(Recommended curriculum for a major in the area of Com- 
merce without right of teaching certificate) 

First Year 

First Semester Hours Second Semester Hours 

Commerce 100 3 Commerce 119 3 

Commerce 131 1 Commerce 152 2 

Commerce 151 -- 2 English 102 _ __ 3 

English 101 3 Health 100 2 

Physical Education 110 1/2 Library Science 166 1 

Science 109 or 111 3 Physical Education 110 V2 

Social Science 100 3 Science 110 or 112 3 

Sociology 100 (Women) 1 Social Science 101 3 

161/2 171/2 

Second Year 

Commerce 120 3 Commerce 221 3 

Commerce 230 3 Commerce 231 3 

English 211 3 English 212 3 

Foreign Language or Foreign Language or 

Mathematics 3 Mathematics 3 

History 141 3 History 142 3 

Physical Education 110 J^ Physical Education 110 Vz 

Elective 1 or 2 Elective 1 or 2 



16»/2 or 171/2 16'/2 or I7V2 
Third Year 

Commerce 405 3 Commerce 301 - — 3 

Commerce Elective 3 Commerce 309 3 

English 131 or 231 or Commerce Elective 3 

301 and 2 hrs. .3 or 4 Restricted Elective 3 

Geography 221 3 Elective 4 or 5 

Restricted Elective 3 

Elective 1 or 2 



16 or 18 16 or 17 

Fourth Year 

Commerce Elective 9 Commerce Elective 7 

Restricted Elective 3 Elective 9 

Elective 4 or 5 



16 or 17 16 

Accounting: 119, 120, 221, 325, 326, 327, 328, 425, 441. 

Secretarial Practice: 131, 151, 152, 216, 253, 260, 302, 303. 

General Business: 100, 124, 230, 231, 260, 309, 310, 311, 324, 339, 341, 343, 405. 
406, 407, 430, 431, 440, 443. 

Methods and Materials: 461a, 461b 



94 EASTERN STATE COLLEGE 

COMMERCE 
LOWER DIVISION COURSES 

Commerce 100. (Formerly Commerce 126 and Commerce 14a and 14b.) 

Business Mathematics. Three hours. 

Rapid calculation in the fundamental processes; drawings and graphs; 
percentage; buying and selling merchandise; commercial discounts; recording 
purchases and sales; paying for goods; collecting bills; accounts; fractions; 
aliquot parts; decimal fractions; pay rolls; interest; installment buying; bank 
discount; partial payments; profit and loss; commission and brokerage; 
marked price; taxes; insurance; stocks; bonds; civil service problems. 

Commerce 119. (Formerly Commerce 10.) Elementary Accounting. Three 
hours. 

The accounting equation; the balance sheet; the profit and loss state- 
ment; books of original entry; the theory of debit and credit; the general 
ledger; adjusting and closing entries; the accounting cycle explained; using 
a minimum of books ; subsidiary ledgers and controlling accounts. Practice 
sets of books are worked out by the students. 

Commerce 120. (Formerly Commerce 11.) Principles of Accounting. 
Three hours. 

Prerequisite: Commerce 119. 

Credit transactions; promissory notes; interest; discount; valuation ac- 
counts; accrued and deferred items; business papers; the periodic summary; 
the theory of partnership accounting. A partnership set of books is worked 
out by the students. 

Commerce 124. (Formerly Commerce 17.) Economic History of Europe. 
Three hours. 

The history of the development of agriculture, commerce, transportation, 
industry, labor legislation, socialism, social insurance, population and popula- 
tion trends, and finance in the principal European nations. 

Commerce 131. (Formerly Commerce 5.) Penmanship. One hour. 

Characteristics of good handwriting; illustrations of good handwriting; 
practice in developing desirable skills in executing legible handwriting; 
methods of teaching handwriting. 

Commerce 151. (Formerly Commerce 15a.) Beginning Typewriting. 
Two hours. Fee, $1.00. 

Speed building technique; knowledge and care of the machine; personal 
and business letters; use of carbon paper; tabulating; term papers and note- 
books. 

Commerce 152. (Formerly Commerce 15b.) Advanced Typewriting. Two 
hours. Fee, $1.00. 

Prerequisite : Commerce 15a or its equivalent. 

Speed building; business papers; manuscripts; reports. 

Commerce 215. (Formerly Commerce 27a.) Beginning Shorthand. Three 
hours. 

Prerequisite: Commerce 15a or its equivalent. 

Principles of Gregg shorthand taught by modified functional method; 
dictation and transcription. 

Commerce 216. (Formerly Commerce 27b and part of Com. 27c.) 
Advanced Shorthand. Three hours. 

Review of shorthand theory; dictation and transcription; introduction to 
transcription of shorthand notes on the typewriter. 



RICHMOND, KENTUCKY 95 



Commerce 221. (Formerly Commerce 12.) Principles of Accounting. 
Three hours. 

Prerequisite: Commerce 119, 120. 

The voucher system; nature and characteristics of the corporation; 
corporation accounts and records; corporate earnings and surplus; corpora- 
tion securities; accounting for manufacturing; departmental accounting; 
branch -accounting; consolidated statements; budgets; personal accounting; 
analysis and interpretation of financial statements; accounting for 
management. 

Commerce 230. (Formerly Commerce 28 and 29.) Principles of Economics. 
Three hours. 

Industry and economics, production and related concepts; specialization; 
competition; cooperation; the time-consuming production process; combining 
the agents of production; the organization of the business enterprise; risk in 
industry; the monetary system; the banking system; the fluctuating price 
level; monetary aspects of economic balance; the business cycle; individual 
prices; the background of demand and supply; prices under pure and 
monopolistic competition; interrelated prices and the price system; the 
mechanism of international trade; the economy of international trade; the 
share of income; the wages of labor; interest; income from land; the profits 
of the business enterprises. 

Commerce 231. (Formerly Commerce 39.) Principles of Applied Eco- 
nomics. Three hours. 

Economic science and its application; consumption and the guidance of 
industry; wastes in production; unemployment and other forms of idle power; 
the integration of industry ; efficiency in management; industrial unrest and 
conflict; industrial peace; profit-sharing and joint control industry; problems 
of population; efficiency in marketing; the price system and its control; 
regulation of public utility rates; control of banking in the United States; 
stabilizing our monetary system; business cycles and their control; free trade 
and protection; international debts and economic imperialism; the relation 
between government and industry; government regulation and ownership; 
financing the government; the revenue system of the United States; the 
problem of inequality; agricultural problems; types of economic organization; 
and important industries of the United States. 

Commerce 253. (Formerly Commerce 16a.) Advanced Typewriting. 
Two hours. Fee, $1.00. 

Prerequisite: Commerce 152 or its equivalent. 
Advanced typing problems; use of office machines. 

Commerce 260. (Formerly Commerce 26.) Consumer Economics. Three 
hours. 

The role of consumers in economic life; consumers' choice; who guides 
consumers; freedom of choice; custom-made wants; choosing goods for dis- 
play; fashion-made wants; imitative wants; producer-made wants; the profit- 
able practice of fraud; price appeal; making it easy to buy; consumer educa- 
tion; planning expenditures; intelligent buying; co-operative buying; buying 
protection; buying shelter; buying investments; producer aids to consumers; 
standards of consumers; governmental aids to consumers. 

Commerce 280. (Formerly Commerce 18.) Filing. One hour. 
Principles and practices of alphabetic, numeric, subject, and geographic 
filing. 



96 EASTERN STATE COLLEGE 

UPPER DIVISION COURSES 

(Open to Junior, Senior, and Graduate Students) 

Commerce 301. (Formerly Commerce 23.) Business English. Three hours. 

The essential qualities of business writing; the sales letter; appeals to 
special classes; follow-up letters; inquiries, orders, and responses; credit 
letters; collection letters; adjustment letters; letters of application; business 
reports; style studies. 

Commerce 302. (Formerly Commerce 27d.) Dictation and Transcription. 
Three hours. 

Prerequisite: Commerce 301. 

Shorthand vocabulary building; dictation; transcription of shorthand 
notes on the typewriter. 

Commerce 303. (Formerly Commerce 27e.) Secretarial Practice. Three 
hours. 

Correlation of business correspondence; shorthand; typewriting; secre- 
tarial problems; office experience. 

Commerce 309. (Formerly Commerce 32.) Business Organization. Three 
hours. 

Prerequisite: Commerce 230. 

Classes of business organization, their evolution, and the tests of 
efficiency; individual entrepreneur organization; partnership; corporation; 
joint-stock company; business trusts; simple agreements and price combina- 
tions: pools; combination trusts; community-of -interest organization; hold- 
ing company; amalgamations; mergers; promotion; underwriting; stock ex- 
changes ; reorganizations and receiverships; legislation. 

Commerce 310. (Formerly Commerce 33a.) American Economic History. 
Three hours. 

Historical development of commerce, industry, transportation, banking, 
labor problems, business organization, monetary problems, and agriculture 
in the United States from the settlement of the nation to the Civil War. 

Commerce 311. (Formerly Commerce 33b.) Amrican Economic History. 
Three hours. 

Historical development of commerce, industry, transportation, banking, 
labor problems, business organization, monetary problems, and agriculture 
in the United States from the Civil War period to the present. 

Comjnerce 324. (Formerly Commerce 38.) Money and Banking. Three 
hours. 

Prerequisite: Commerce 230. 

Nature and functions of money; kinds of money; monetary systems; 
history of banking; functions of the bank; bank administration; the national 
banking system; deposits and depositors; the clearing house; domestic and 
foreign exchange; loans and discounts; bank supervision; savings banks; trust 
companies; foreign banking systems; the federal reserve system. 

Commerce ,325. (Formerly Commerce 20a.) Principles of Accounting — 
Advanced. Four hours. 

The accounting process illustrated; statements from incomplete data; 
cash and receivables; inventories; investments; fixed assets; deferred charges; 
liabilities; capital stock; surplus; installment sales; errors and their cor- 
rection; statement of application of funds. 

Commerce 326. (Formerly Commerce 20b.) Principles of Accoxinting — 
Advanced. Four hours. 

Analysis of financial statements; partnership formation and operation; 
partnership dissolution and liquidation; joint ventures; consignments; agency 



RICHMOND, KENTUCKY 97 



and branch accounts ; corporate combination and consolidated balance sheet; 
consolidated statement of profit and loss; statement of affairs; receivership 
accounts and statements. 

Commerce 327. (Formerly Commerce 30.) Cost Accounting. Three hours. 

Prerequisite: Commerce 119, 120, 221. 

Basic cost accounting terminology : the cost accounting cycle ; accounting 
entries for the cost accounting cycle : the voucher register in cost accounting; 
special ledgers used in cost accounting; materials control and accounting; 
material inventory records; accounting for labor in cost accounting work; 
factory wage system: manufacturing expenses; departmentalization of 
factory expenses; cost summaries and financial statements. A cost account- 
ing set of books is worked out by the students. 

Commerce 328. (Formerly Commerce 31.) Income Tax Accounting. 
Four hours. 

Income tax legislation — Federal and State : returns for individuals ; exempt 
income of individuals; deductions allowed individuals; computation of in- 
dividual taxes; returns for corporations; accounting procedure; administra- 
tive procedure; the capital stock tax; the excess profits tax; the estate tax; 
the gift tax: excise taxes. Students will have experience filling out income 
tax return forms. 

Commerce 339. (Formerly Commerce 34.) Mathematics of Finance. 
Three hours. 

Bank discount; true discount and present value: exact interest; logarithms; 
equation of accounts; domestic and foreign exchange; series annuities; bond 
valuation; business graphs; cumulative annuities; cumulative sinking funds; 
cumulative amortization plans; building and loan association calculations; 
industrial loans. 

Commerce 341. (Formerly Commerce 35.) Salesmanship. Four hours. 

The art of selling : the motive behind all buying : the customer's mental 
journey; attitudes of buyer and salesman: preparation of the selling talk; 
the pre-approach ; the Interview: arousing interest; creating desire; answering 
objections; meeting excuses; diplomacy of the close: types of customers. 

Commerce 343. (Formerly Commerce 37.) Advertising. Four hours. 

The specific purpose of advertising; developing the copy; slogans; trade- 
marks; layouts: engraving: scheduling of advertisements in newspapers and 
magazines; direct mail advertising; outdoor advertising; dealer display ad- 
vertising; economic aspects of advertising; federal laws affecting advertising. 

Commerce 405. (Formerly Commerce 40.) Business Law. Three hours. 
Law in general, kinds of law; persons, torts; contracts: personal property; 
real property. 

Comjnerce 406. (Formerly Commerce 41a.) Business Law. Three hours. 
Agency; partnership; corporations; bailments: sales of personal property; 
market practices. 

Commerce 407. (Formerly Commerce 41b.) Business Law. Three hours. 
Negotiable contract, suretyship and guaranty; privileges of debtors; labor 
relations. 

Commerce 425. (Formerly Commerce 46.) Accounting Problems. Two 
hours. 

Prerequisite: Commerce 119, 120, 221. 

This is an advanced course in accounting and the contents will be de- 
termined by the needs of the students registering for it. 

Eastern — 4 



EASTERN STATE COLLEGE 



Conunerce 430. (Formerly Commerce 42.) Public Finance and Taxation I. 
Three hours. 

Distribution of government burdens; the general property tax; modified 
property tax; shifting and incidence of taxation; the income tax; death and 
gift taxes; taxes upon business; consumption taxes; motor vehicle taxes; the 
poll tax; social security taxes ; taxes on natural resources; non-tax revenue. 

Commerce 431. (Formerly Commerce 43.) Public Finance and Taxation 
II. Three hours. 

A continuation of Commerce 430. 

The power of tax; tax limitations; inter-governmental relations in taxa- 
tion; public expenditures; state and federal aid; economy in expenditures; 
problems of public borrowing; fiscal administration. 

Commerce 440. (Formerly Commerce 44.) Investments. Three hours. 

Characteristics of bonds ; characteristics of stocks ; securities markets; 
investment banking; sources of investment information; interpreting financial 
news; taxation of securities; investors of limited means; analysis of securities. 

Commerce 441. (Formerly Commerce 47.) Auditing. Four hours. 

Preliminary arrangements for an audit; general procedure of an audit; 
the original records; the asset accounts; the liability accounts; operating 
accounts; the audit report. An auditing problem is worked to illustrate the 
principles discussed in class. 

Commerce 443. (Formerly Commerce 45.) Marketing. Three hours. 

Prerequisite : Commerce 28. 

Consumer's buying motives; marketing functions and institutions; selling 
direct to consumer; earlier and simpler types of retail institutions; depart- 
ment stores; mail-order houses; chain stores; agricultural wholesale markets; 
middlemen of the city agricultural markets; classes and types of wholesaler; 
raw materials; cooperative marketing; speculation; prices and some price 
policies; brands and brand policies ; ethical aspects of marketing. 

, Commerce 461a. (Formerly Commerce 36a.) Methods of Teaching 
Stenography. Two hours. 

This course is a prerequisite to student teaching in commerce. 

Survey of modern methods of teaching Gregg shorthand, typewriting, and 
secretarial practice; lesson planning and presentation; observation of class- 
room procedures; supplies and equipment; development of skill in writing 
shorthand on the blackboard. 

Commerce 461b. (Formerly Commerce 36b.) Methods of Teaching Book- 
keeping, Accounting, and General Business. Two hours. 

This course is a prerequisite to student teaching in commerce. 

Objectives in giving bookkeeping, accounting, and general business 
courses; textbooks suitable for use; supplementary material; methods of ap- 
proach; how to teach certain phases of our financial life; communication; 
travel and transportation; buying and selling; the work at the end of a fiscal 
period for bookkeepers and accountants, including accrued and deferred items, 
adjusting entries, working sheets, financial statements, closing entires; suit- 
able examinations. 

GRADUATE DIVISION COURSES 

Commerce 510. (Formerly Commerce 50.) History of Economic Thought. 
Three hours. 

In this course a survey of economic thought and doctrine from the ancient 
period to the end of the classical period will be made. 

Commerce 511. (Formerly Commerce 51.) Economic Thought Since the 
Austrian School. Three hours. 

This is a continuation of Commerce 510. The chief economical doctrines 
since the Austrian school wiU be studied. 




CAMMACK BUILDING 

The Elementary Trainingr School 



100 



EASTERN STATE COLLEGE 



EDUCATION 

(Recommended curriculum for a major in Elementary Educa- 
tion with right of Standard Elementary Teaching Certificate) 



First Year 



First Semester Hours 

English 101 -. 3 

History 141 or 202 3 

Library Science 166 1 

Physical Education 110 Yz 

Science 109 or 111 3 

Social Science Elective 3 

Sociology 100 (Women) 1 

Elective 2 

16 1/2 



Second Semester Hours 

English 102 3 

History 142 or 203 3 

Health 201 3 

Physical Education 110 V2 

Science 110 or 112 3 

Elective 3 



15>/2 



Second Year 



Art 260 3 

Education 211 3 

Education 254 3 

English 260 3 

Physical Education 110 V2 

Physical Education 220 2 

Science Elective (Biological 

or Physical Science) 3 

171/2 



Education 260 3 

Education 267 8 

Physical Education 110 ^'2 

Social Science Elective 3 

Elective 2 



I6V2 



Third Year 



English (Literature) 3 

Home Economics 3io 2 

Music 260 3 

Science 261 2 

Social Science Elective 3 

Elective 3 



16 



Agriculture 243 or 

Sociology 331 3 

English (Literature) 3 

Geography 271 or 372 3 

Music Elective 3 

Science 262 2 

Elective 2 



16 



Fourth Year 

Art Elective 3 Social Science Elective 

Education 313 3 Elective 

Education 463 8 

English 318 3 

17 



. 3 
.13 



16 



Art 217 and Industrial Arts 222 are recommended as electives leading to 
the Standard Elementary Certificate. 



RICHMOND, KENTUCKY 101 

Recommended Curriculum for the Provisional Elementary 

Certificate 

First Year 

First Semester Hours Second Semester Hours 

English 101 3 Education 190 3 

History 141 or 202 3 English 102 3 

Library Science 166 1 Health 201 3 

Physical Education 110 Vz History 142 or 203 3 

Science 109 or 111 3 Physical Education 110 V2 

Social Science elective 3 Science 110 or 112 3 

Sociology 100 1 

Elective - 2 

I6V2 I5V2 

Second Year 

Art 260 3 Education 260 3 

Education 211 3 Education 267 8 

Education 254 3 Music 260 3 

English 260 3 Physical Education 110 V2 

Physical Education 110 1/2 Elective — 2 

Physical Education 220 2 

Elective ..- 3 

171/2 I6V2 



Art 217, English 131, and Industrial Arts 222 are recommended as electives 
leading to the Standard Elementary Certificates. 



EDUCATION 
LOWER DIVISION COURSES 

Education 190. (Formerly Education 19a.) Rural School Organization and 
Management. Three hours. 

Organizing the rural elementary school daily program; school housekeep- 
ing; understanding pupils; playground activities; school equipment and sup- 
plies : keeping records and making reports : problems of attendance ; school 
libraries and the use of textbooks; educative seatwork and supervised study: 
school marks and marking systems; pupil classification and promotion: test- 
ing and evaluating results; community cooperation; teacher qualifications 
and relationships. 

Education 211. (Formerly Education 21.) Psychology of Development 
and Education. Three hours. 

Problems in understanding human development and education; physical 
growth of the child and of the adolescent; language development: how be- 
havior is motivated ; development of emotional life : social development in 
childhood and adolescence; intellectual growth; the individual: the learner 
and the nature of learning in childhood and adolescence; personality 
development. 

Education 254. (Formerly Education 22.) Reading in the Elementary 
School. Three hours. 

Objectives of reading in the elementary school; reading in the primary 
and intermediate grades; the place of oral reading in the grades; individual 
differences in reading: word difficulties; phonics: measuring reading instruc- 
tion; motivation; materials of instruction. 



102 EASTERN STATE COLLEGE 



Education 260. (Formerly Mathematics 26.) Teachers' Arithmetic. Three 
hours. 

Aims and objectives of arithmetic; value of problems; assignments; 
examinations; importance of accuracy and speed; value of drill; games; 
solutions of problems; methods of teaching arithmetic. 

Education 267. (Formerly Education 26.) Directed Observation and 
Student Teaching. Eight hours. 

Prerequisites : One semester in residence at Eastern ; standing of "C". 

Graduated approach to responsible teaching in the elementary school 
through experiences in study and discussion, directed observation, organizing 
materials, laboratory work, and gradual participation ; experiences in the 
study of child behavior; the course of study; selection and organization of 
curriculum experiences; teaching the various school subjects; various types 
of teaching and learning techniques and devices ; experiences in playground 
and noon-hour supervision; participation in community activities; techniques 
of guidance, counseling, testing, and evaluating pupil progress. 



UPPER DIVISION COURSES 

(Open to Junior, Senior, and Graduate Students) 

Education 301. (Formerly Education 30.) The Junior High School. Two 
hours. 

Origin, development, and present status of the junior high school move- 
ment; the place of the junior high school in the public school system; the 
aims, purposes, and objectives of the junior high school; evaluation of types 
of programs ; the junior high school plant; library, apparatus, and equipment 
of the junior high school. 

Education 302. (Formerly Education 32.) Pupil Accounting. Three hours. 

Relation of attendance to pupil progress; social and economic factors 
which affect attendance; school census; personnel records. In developing 
these topics a study will be made of personnel work in typical schools of 
Kentucky. 

Education 303. Social Case Study. Three hours. 

This course is designed for the training of attendance officers and covers 
a study of various approaches to understanding of the pupil with an educa- 
tional setting as the basis of study. Some attention is given to social case 
work as it relates to the social and economic problems of the community. 

Education 304. (Formerly Home Economics 36.) Vocational Home 
Economics Education. Three hours. 

Prerequisite: Education 211. 

The home economics teacher in the community; the needs of high school 
girls and the community; the planning of units of study and how to teach 
these through study of various teaching techniques. 

Education 313. (Formerly Education 31.) Child Development and Psy- 
chology. Three hours. 

Development before birth; the organism as a dynamic system; the 
organization of behavior; physical growth; motor development; the child in 
the home and family relationships; the child and his school; language de- 
velopment; emotional development; behavior difficulties and personality 
patterns ; mental development in children ; learning; interests of children — 
play, graphic and musical expression, reading, radio, and the movies; 
techniques of studying child development and of influencing behavior. 



RICHMOND, KENTUCKY 103 



Education 314. (Formerly Education 34.) Adolescent Development and 
Psychology. Three hours. 

Physical development; mental development; growth of intelligence; 
adolescent interests; emotional life; learning and forgetting; moral and re- 
ligious development; adolescent personality; disturbances of personality; 
hygiene of adolescence; prediction of adolescent behavior; guidance of 
adolescent behavior. 

Education 364. (Formerly Education 36.) Fundamentals of Secondary 
School Methods. Four or six hours. 

Graduated approach to responsible room teaching through experiences in 
study and discussion, organizing materials, directed observation, laboratory 
work, and gradual participation; development of the American secondary 
school; experiences in the study of pupil behavior; selection and organiza- 
tion of curriculum experiences; variation in techniques of teaching in dif- 
ferent types of learning; learning objectives, interests, methods, and materials 
in special fields; experiences involving management and co-curricular duties; 
experiences in human relationship. 

Education 368. (Formerly Mathematics 31.) Elementary Statistical 
Methods. Three hours. 

Methods of collecting data; methods of tabulation of data; uses and pur- 
poses of statistical methods; central tendencies; deviations; correlations; 
graphic methods. 

Education 370. (Formerly Education 37.) Resource-Use Education. 
Three hours. 

This course is designed to help teachers understand the dynamic role of 
education in developing resources — natural, human, and cultural — and to aid 
them in making better use of resources in teaching. Topics: meaning and 
objectives of resource-use education; analysis of state, regional, and national 
resources; selecting and organizing resource materials for effective teaching 
purposes; use of field trips, visual aids, readings, and other activities; sources 
of materials from state, regional, and national agencies; types of aids available 
to teachers; state, regional, and national planning for the conservation and 
wise use of resources; some principles of resource-use education. 

Education 383. (Formerly Education 47.) Public School Administration 
and Supervision. Three hours. 

This course deals with the total school system and is designed to give 
students a clear picture of the organization and administration of the public 
school system. Among the topics treated are the study of and participation 
in experiences leading to an understanding of principles and practices in the 
organization and administration of school systems; study of the functions of 
education in a democracy; function and scope of school administration and 
supervision; school organization and control; the work of school officials; the 
board of education and its work; major problems connected with the ad- 
ministration and supervision of public education. 

Education 421a. (Formerly Education 40.) Measurement and Evaluation 
in the Elementary School. Two hours. 

Growth of measurement and evaluation; types of tests and evaluative 
procedures; test construction; selecting, giving, scoring, and interpreting 
tests; tests of intelligence and of special aptitudes; measurement and evalua- 
tion in arithmetic, language, spelling, handwriting, the social sciences, art 
and music, miscellaneous areas, and general achievements; uses of tests and 
evaluative techniques. 



104 EASTERN STATE COLLEGE 



Education 421b. (Formerly Education 41.) Measurement and Evaluation 
in the Secondary School. Two hours. 

Growth of measurement and evaluation : types of tests and evaluative 
procedures; test construction; selecting, giving, scoring, and interpreting 
tests; tests of intelligence and of special aptitudes : measurement and 
evaluation in language, mathematics, science, social studies, special subjects, 
general achievement, and personality adjustment; uses of tests and evaluative 
techniques. 

Education 441. (Formerly Education 43.) The Elementary School Cur- 
riculum. Three hours. 

Objectives of education in light of society ; function of the school; function 
of the curriculum; the curriculum as related to the objectives of education 
and to society; criteria for evaluating curricula: need and procedure for 
curriculum revision and construction. 

Education 442. (Formerly Education 42.) Administration and Supervision 
of the Elementary School. Three hours. 

Aims and objectives of the elementary school: types of elementary school 
organization; time allotments; attendance: library service; classification and 
promotion of pupils; health; publicity ; special classes; plant ; office manage- 
ment; organization for supervision : the principal and his opportunity for 
leadership. 

Education 461. (Formerly Education 45.) High School Administration 
and Supervision. Three hours. 

Scope and function of administration; administration of the program of 
studies: the vocational program; the health program; the extracurriculum ; 
the guidance program; the program for individual differences; schedule of 
classes; personnel and organization; buildings and grounds: equipment and 
supplies; office standards; procedures and forms; the school and the 
community. 

Education 463. (Formerly Education 46.) Supervised Student Teaching. 
Eight or ten hours. 

Observation, participation, and responsible room teaching; child study 
with special case study problems and remedial work; development of skills 
and techniques desirable for good school procedure, the location, collection, 
and organization of materials for instruction : study of community occupations, 
resources, social and economic problems : experience in meeting parents, 
visiting homes, participation in social programs of school and community; 
experience in directing various kinds of activities including routine school 
duties, field trips, and extracurricular program : acquaintance with the school 
organization, school policies, system of records and the like; learning how to 
maintain desirable pupil-teacher relationship. 

Education 464. (Formerly Education 44.) Principles of Secondary Educa- 
tion. Three hours. 

Growth and background of American secondary school; variability and 
selection of the pupil: aims and functions of secondary education; relation to 
elementary and higher education; forms of organization; comparison between 
European and American secondary schools; the rural school: vocational educa- 
tion: trends and methods of curriculum construction; the secondary school 
offerings: extracurricular activities; guidance and community relationship; 
vision of secondary education. 

Education 466. (Formerly Home Economics 46.) Advanced Methods in 
Home Economics. Three hours. 

Prerequisite: Education 304 or taken concurrently. 

The student has an opportunity to prepare some teaching materials, visit 
other schools, become familiar with part-time and adult programs, lunch- 
rooms, keeping of records, clubs, and assembly programs. 



RICHMOND, KENTUCKY 105 



GRADUATE DIVISION COURSES 

Education 501. (Formerly Education 50a.) School Administration I. 
Three hours. 

Federal relations to education; the state as a fundamental school unit; 
general school law and court decisions relating to public education; powers 
and duties of state school officials; work of the state department of educa- 
tion; local units for school control; powers and duties of local school officials; 
administration of adult education and other types of special education; the 
administration of teacher personnel; public-school relations. 

Education 502. (Formerly Education 50b.) School Administration II. 
Three hours. 

Administration of pupil accounting; the school census; attendance; 
records and reports; organization and administration of the supervisory pro- 
gram; curriculum administration; selection of school sites; building plans and 
designs; school building management ; operation and maintenance of the 
school plant; selection and use of equipment and supplies; organization of 
school libraries; auxiliary agencies; administration of health education; 
school consolidation and transportation; office administration. 

Education 503. (Formerly Education 50c.) School Administration III. 
Three hours. 

The school finance situation; state and local problems of school finance; 
sources of public-school revenues; preparation and administration of the 
budget; cost accounting; financial records and reports; types of fiscal con- 
trol; school indebtedness; short-term borrowing; school bonds; preparation 
and administration of the salary schedule; financial aspects of school pub- 
licity; educational inequalities; units of school support; apportioning school 
funds; economies in school administration. 

Education 510. (Formerly Education 51a and 51c.) Curriculum Problems 
and the Improvement of Instruction in Elementary Schools. Three hours. 

Meaning and function of education; underlying principles developed for 
curriculum use and curriculum revision ; interpretation of the learning ex- 
periences (school subjects in light of the meaning and function of education); 
study of concrete materials and classroom procedure with a representative 
range of practical problems in various subject areas: types of organization 
used in modern instruction; how children learn; various educational agencies 
in the community; how the school may be made a real community center; 
laboratory study and field trips. 

Education 511. (Formerly Education 51b.) Rural School Supervision. 
Three hours. 

Objectives and problems of rural school supervision; techniques and 
functions of supervision; current practices in rural supervision; problems of 
organizing instruction to meet increasing responsibilities of rural schools; 
analyzing teachers' difficulties: planning supervisory programs; selecting and 
organizing instructional materials: locating and using community resources 
and other aids available to rural teachers : techniques for developing desir- 
able professional relations; problems of in-service education for rural 
teachers. Each member of the group will plan a supervisory program for a 
local school system in Kentucky as a special project in the course. 

Education 515. (Formerly Education 52.) Human Development and the 
Psychology of Learning. Three hours. 

Developmental factors and individual differences; motives; goals, and 
purposes; arranging the learning situation; problem solving and creative 
expressions; acquiring skill and information; transfer; the curriculum; social 
setting for learning: evaluation of development and learning. 



106 EASTERN STATE COLLEGE 



Education 521. (Formerly Education 53.) Audio-visual Education. Three 
hours. 

Meaning and value of audio-visual aids; fundamental principles de- 
veloped for the selection, organization, and utilization of audio-visual 
materials; detailed study of various sources of visual aids; formation of 
standards for evaluation; laboratory study and field trips. Special attention 
is given to problems of organizing these materials in a school. 

Education 522. (Formerly Education 54.) Personality Development and 
Adjustment. Three hours. 

Foundations of personality; human development and personality; the 
home and personality; the school and personality; the social order and per- 
sonality; frustration and aggression; conflicts and other maladjustments; the 
analysis and personality ; improving personality; educational implications of 
the psychology of personality; a case history illustrating the foregoing topics. 

Education 531. (Formerly Education 55a.) History of Education. Two 
hours. 

Brief survey of the history of education in ancient and medieval times 
with special reference to the contribution of Greece, Rome, and Christianity 
to modern education; educational influences of the Renaissance and the 
Protestant Reformation; the role of the doctrine of formal discipline; educa- 
tional influence of Comenius, Rousseau, Pestalozzi, Frobel, and Herbart. 

Education 532. (Formerly Education 55b.) History of Education In the 
United States. Two hours. 

Rise and development of pubhc education in the United States with 
special emphasis upon the work of Horace Mann; sociological, psychological, 
and scientific movements in education ; desirable educational reorganizations ; 
the influence of John Dewey; brief study of the development of public 
education in Kentucky. 

Education 536. (Formerly Education 55c.) Philosophy of Education. 
Two hours. 

Meaning and scope of philosophy and education; contrasting philosophies 
and conceptions of education; the nature and meaning of education in rela- 
tion to the individual and the social order; education and democracy; social 
progress and social control; the nature of thinking; educational aims and 
values; subject matter and methodology in relation to the educative process; 
character education ; evaluation and interpretation of present-day issues and 
problems in education. 

Education 537. (Formerly Education 55d.) Comparative Education. Two 
hours. 

Examination, comparison, and discussion of the background of conditions 
and theories which have resulted in the present practices in education in the 
world today with special emphasis upon the school systems and practices in 
Germany, France, England, Russia, Denmark, Sweden, China, Australia, 
Canada, Mexico, and representative South American countries. Comparisons 
will be made between education in America and in foreign countries. 

Education 542. (Formerly Education 56.) Applied Statistical Methods. 
Two hours. 

Prerequisite: Education 368. 

Measurements in psychology and education; frequency distributions; 
measures of central tendency; measures of variability; applications of the 
normal distribution curve; reliability and significance of statistics; testing 
hypothesis; prediction and errors of prediction; correlation methods; re- 
liability and validity of tests. 

Education 543. Investigations in Rural Education. Two hours. 

This course is designed to familiarize the student with the important 
problems in the field of rural education. Among the subjects considered are 
the problems of attendance, improvement of instruction, techniques of teach- 



RICHMOND, KENTUCKY 107 



ing, school consolidation and pupil transportation, libraries, playground 
activities, lunchrooms, community organizations, and the community school. 

Education 550. (Formerly Education 57 and 57a.) Educational Sociology. 
Three hours. 

Relation of sociology to education; sociological problems and their educa- 
tional implications; social groups and Institutions in relation to education; 
social forces and their significance in society; the sociological determination 
of educational objectives; social elements and values in the curriculum; 
democracy in school administration and supervision ; essential elements of a 
socialized educational program. 

Education 551. (Formerly Education 57b.) Problems in Vocational Educa- 
tion. Two hours. 

Meaning and need of vocational education; basic principles formulated 
for the study of vocations and the application of these principles to in- 
telligent selection of a vocation ; comprehensive study of the factors determin- 
ing an intelligent vocational choice including job analysis and analysis of 
human and economic resources. Emphasis is placed on how vocational 
education may function in the small as well as the large school system. 

Education 561. (Formerly Education 58a.) High School Administration. 
Two hours. 

Secondary school organization; the principal; the staff; the pupils; pro- 
gram of studies ; schedules ; community relationships; records and reports; 
articulation; library; plant; finance; other high school problems. 

Education 563. (Formerly Education 58b and 58c.) Improvement of In- 
struction in the Secondary School. Three hours. 

Aims of the public secondary schools; plans for evaluating curriculum 
procedures; qualities of good teaching; procedures of evaluating and im- 
proving class-room teaching; methods of making the school a more effective 
agency. 

Education 565. Investigations in Reading. Two hours. 

This course is designed for graduate students who desire to make a 
critical study of the investigative and theoretical literatures dealing with the 
teaching of reading in the elementary school. 

Education 566. Investigations in Mathematics. Two hours. 

This course is designed for graduate students who desire to make a 
critical study of the investigative and theoretical literatures dealing with the 
teaching of mathematics in the elementary school. 

Education 567. Investigations in Social Studies. Two hours. 

This course is designed for graduate students who desire to make a critical 
study of the investigative and theoretical literatures dealing with the teaching 
of social studies in the elementary school. 

Education 569. (Formerly Education 59d.) Research in Education. Two 
hours. 

Functions of educational research; types of research and the principal 
techniques of each type; bibliography; discovering educational problems for 
study; organization and Interpretation of data; preparing and evaluating re- 
search reports; class discussions and reading reports. 

Required of all graduate students who do not prepare a thesis. 

Education 570. Seminar. One hour. 

Education 571. Seminarv ' One hour. 

Education 572. Seminar. One hour. 

The Seminar is designed for students who are preparing a thesis in 
partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Arts in 
Education. If the thesis requirement is waived, Education 569, Research in 
Education, is required. 



108 EASTERN STATE COLLEGE 



ENGLISH 

(Recommended curriculum, for a major in English with right of 
teaching certificate) 

First Year 

First Semester Hours Second Semester Hours 

English 101 3 English 102 3 

History 141 3 English 131 (or Eng. 231») 3 

Physical Education 110 1/2 History 142 3 

Science 109 or 111 3 Library Science 166 1 

Sociology 100 1 Physical Education 110 V2 

Elective - 6 Science 110 or 112 3 

Elective ._ 3 

IBVa 16»/2 

Second Year 

English 211 3 Enghsh 212 _... 3 

Enghsh 265 „ 2 Education 211 3 

Foreign Language 3 Foreign Language 3 

Health 201 3 History 202 or 203 3 

Physical Education 110 V2 Physical Education 110 Vs 

Physical Education 225 2 Elective 4 

Elective - 3 

I6V3 I6V2 

Third Year 

Education 383 3 English 302 2 

English 301 ._ 2 English Elective 3 

English Elective 3 Foreign Language 3 

Foreign Language 3 History 341 or 342 3 

Elective — - 5 Elective — 5 

16 16 

Fourth Year 

English 441 3 Education 364 6 

English Elective 2 Education 463 10 

Sociology 331 3 

Elective 8 

16 16 

English majors should select for their English electives one 
course in group 3 and at least one course each from two of the 
remaining groups and enough other courses to make a total of 24 
hours in addition to English 101 and 102: 

1. English 318, 321, 322 2. English 311, 312, 314, 317 

3. English 421, 423, 424, 425 4. English 216, 201, 202, 263, 319, 327 

A student with a first major in some other department may 
take the following courses for a second major in English: English 
101, 102, 131 or 231, 211, 212, 301, 302, 441; and one course each from 



• If English 231 is elected, it should be postponed until the sophomore 
year. 



RICHMOND, KENTUCKY 109 

any three of the following groups to make a minimum of 24 hours 
exclusive of English 101 and 102: 

1. English 318, 321, 322 2. English 311, 312, 314, 317 

3. English 421, 423, 424, 425 4. Enghsh 201, 202, 216, 263, 265, 

319, 327 

Students with second majors in English are urged to meet the 
requirements in foreign language for the first major if it is possible 
to do so. 

A student with a major and a minor in other departments may 
take the following courses for a minor in English: 

I. Literature— English 101, 102, 211, 212, 301, and one course 
each from the following groups to make a minimum of 18 hours 
exclusive of English 101 and 102: 

1. English 131, 201, 202, 231, 265 2. English 216, 311, 314, 317 

3. English 312, 318, 321, 322 4. English 421, 423, 424, 425 

II. Speech and Dramatics — English 101, 102, 131, 211, 212, 231, 
263, 264 or 431, 305 or 331, 311 or 312. 

The student who wishes to major in English without right of 
certification to teach may follow the curriculum for the first major 
given above, but substitute other courses for those in education. 



ENGLISH 
LOWER DIVISION COURSES 

English 101. (Formerly English 10a, 10b.) Spoken and Written Com- 
munication I. Three hours. 

Study or review of the mechanics of expression, such as grammar, 
punctuation, spelling, and sentence structure : word study and good usage, 
including the use of the dictionary; practice in letter writing and in organiz- 
ing and presenting, both in writing and speaking (especially in brief composi- 
tions and expository speeclies) material from the student's experience and 
observation and from his reading and study; some practice in more effective 
reading and listening. 

English 102. (Formerly English 10b, 10c.) Spoken and Written Com- 
munication II. Three hours. 

Prerequisite: English 101. 

Continued practice in organizing and presenting material as written and 
spoken composition. Longer compositions; at least one longish investigative 
paper which employs the elementary principles of research; paragraph 
structure and development; emphasis on reading and analysis; acceptable 
usage in speaking and writing. 

English 131. (Formerly English 163, 12.) Fundamentals of Speech. Three 
hours. 

Prerequisite: English 101. 

Corrective work for posture and movement; applied science of voice 
production; characteristics of a pleasing voice; individual diagnosis of voice 
qualities; tone-placing; enunciation; pronunciation; pitch, rate, and volume; 



no EASTERN STATE COLLEGE 



nauch practice in individual speaking and reading under careful, constructive 
criticism. 

English 201. (Formerly English 20a.) Journalism I. Two hours. 

Prerequisite: English 101 and 102. 

Survey of newspaper contest; nature of news; special forms of news; 
news gathering ; news writing; features and human interest stories ; mechanics 
of news printing; news ethics; the school newspaper. (Note: Students taking 
this course are expected to work on the college newspaper and to attend 
and "cover" assembly or chapel programs). 

English 202. (Formerly English 20b.) Journalism II. Two hours. 

Prerequisite: English 101 and 102. 

The newspaper as an organ of public opinion and an instrument of the 
general welfare; newspaper history; newspaper poUcies and trends; freedom 
and responsibility of the press; purposes and types of editorials; editorial 
technique; reading and analysis of editorials; editorial writing; press and 
radio ; the informative newspaper and magazine article. 

English 211. (Formerly English 218, 21a.) Survey of Literature I. Three 
hours. 

Prerequisites: English 101 and 102. 

Selections from the great masterpieces of Greek and Latin poetry, drama, 
history, and philosophy; selections from Oriental, Hebrews, and Moham- 
medan literature; selections from medieval myth, saga, and romance; selec- 
tions from the continental literature of the Renaissance ; selections from 
modern French, German, and Russian literature; individual reading of some 
complete masterpieces. 

English 212. (Formerly English 219, 21c.) Survey of Literature II. Three 
hours. 

Prerequisites: English 101 and 102. 

Anglo-Saxon poetry; romances of chivalry; ballads; Chaucer; Shakespeare 
and Elizabethan drama; Renaissance English lyrics; Milton; prose from 
Bacon to Pepys; prose of the New Classicism; poetry of the New Classicism; 
the Romantic poets; English prose of the nineteenth century; American essays 
and addresses; Victorian poets; nineteenth century American poets; the short 
story; the new English drama. 

English 216. (Formerly English 22.) The Short Story. Two hours. 

Prerequisites: English 101 and 102 and one course in literature. 

Technique of the short story ; development of the short story as a literary 
type; romanticism and realism in stories; the short story in America; short 
stories for the high school; the writing of a story or of a paper. 

English 231. (Formerly English 23.) Public Speaking. Three hours. 

Prerequisites: English 101 and 102. 

Source and organization of speech materials; objective and audience con- 
siderations; practice in preparation and delivery of speeches for various 
occasions, purposes and audiences; speech criticism; parliamentary pro- 
cedure with participation drills. 

English 260. (Formerly English 24.) Literature for Children. Three 
hours. 

Prerequisites: English 101 and 102. 

Brief survey of the history of children's hterature and a study of the 
literature itself under the following topics: Mother Goose, fairy tales, folk- 
lore and fables, realistic and fanciful stories, myths, epics and sagas, the 
romance cycles, poetry, fiction, biography, historical and geographical litera- 
ture. Methods of teaching literature in the elementary grades are touched 
upon. 



RICHMOND, KENTUCKY m 



English 262. (Formerly 27a.) Dramatic Presentation I. Two hours. 

Prerequisites : English 101, 102, or permission of instructor. 

English 263. (Formerly English 363, 27b.) Dramatic Presentation II. 
Two hours. 

Prerequisites: English 101 and 102. 

English 264. (Formerly English 25.) Story TeUing. Three hours. 

Prerequisites: English 101, 102 and 260. 

History of story telling; purpose and aim of story telling; story interests 
of childhood; preparing the story; telling the story; dramatizing the story; 
uses of the story in schoolroom subjects; study of a considerable stock of 
stories of a wide range of appeal ; much practice in actual telling of stories to 
children; constructive analysis of each student's performance. 

English 265. (Formerly English 26.) Grammar for Teachers. Two hours. 
Prerequisites: English 101 and 102. 

Parts of speech, syntax and sentence analysis; history of teaching of 
grammar; methods of testing and measuring progress. 



UPPER DIVISION COURSES 

(Open to Junior, Senior, and Graduate Students) 

English 301. (Formerly English 30a.) Advanced Composition I. Two 
hours. 

Required of juniors and seniors who have less than six hours of freshman 
English. 

Required written reports, precis, recommendations; informational essays 
or feature articles, news stories, editorials; book reviews; critical essays; 
research articles. Students are encouraged to write with a view to submitting 
their articles to suitable periodicals for publication. 

EngUsh 302. (Formerly English 30b.) Advanced Composition II. Two 
hours. 

Prerequisite: English 301. 

Practice in writing short stories, one-act dramas, radio and motion 
picture dramas, feature articles, critical essays, familiar essays. Students 
are encouraged to write with a view to submitting the writing to suitable 
agencies for publication. 

English 305. (Formerly English 31.) Discussion and Debate. Three hours. 

Prerequisites: English 101 and 102. 

Logic and semantics ; process of persuasion in the formation of public 
opinion; application of discussion and debate as essential tools for reaching 
decisions in a democratic society. 

English 311. (Formerly English 32a and 32b.) Shakespeare. Three hours. 

Prerequisites : English 101 and 102, and two courses in literature. 

Elizabethan England as a background for the Shakespearian drama; early 
Elizabethan drama; Elizabethan theories of comedy and tragedy; develop- 
ment of Shakespeare's dramatic genius ; problems of authorship, chronology 
and texts; the great comedies, histories, and tragedies; rapid reading of many 
plays and more careful study of a few of the great plays. 



112 EASTERN STATE COLLEGE 



English 312. (Formerly English 33.) Modern Drama. Three hours. 

Prerequisites : English 101 and 102, and two courses in literature. 

Ibsen and his influence; the free theater and the new drama on the 
continent; naturalism and expressionism: the independent theater and the 
dramatic revival in England; the Abbey Theater and the Irish Renaissance; 
American imitators of the European drama; the little theater movement; 
Eugene O'Neill and the repertory theater ; experimental drama. 

English 314. (Formerly English 34a and 34b.) The Novel. Three hours. 

Prerequisites: English 101 and 102, and two courses in literature. 

History, development, and survey of the English novel and the American 
novel from their beginnings to 1920 : content and literary characteristics of the 
different types of novels; foreign influences; extensive reading and discussion 
of the different types of novels. 

English 317. (Formerly English 35a and 35b.) Contemporary Literature. 
Three hours. 

Prerequisites: English 101 and 102, and two courses in literature. 

Creative writing of the last ten years and its roots in the immediate past; 
new influences, new names, new trends in fiction ; consideration of the 
literature of escape, of self-revelation, and of social consciousness; new poets 
and poetic theories and techniques exemplified in current poetry; new 
dramatists and current dramatic theories and techniques ; radio, motion 
picture, and stage drama; evaluation of book reviews and commercial 
organizations designed to influence book selection; extensive rather than 
intensive reading (not confined to any one nation). 

English 318. (Formerly English 36.) Literature of the United States. 
Three hours. 

Prerequisites : English 101 and 102, and two courses in literature. 

Persistence of pioneer attitudes in American literature ; the case for re- 
ligious, political, personal, and economic freedom; from rugged individualism 
toward social concern; "woods longing" and the open road; quest for the 
ideal; inter-racial accommodation and conflict: progress toward realism; men 
and nature; men and machines: men and earth; literary evaluation; teaching 
techniques ; writers as human beings : topics inherent in selected individual 
writings from colonial times to the present. 

English 319. (Formerly English 461 and 40.) Kentucky Literature. Two 
hours. 

Prerequisites : English 101 and 102, and two courses in literature. 

The economic, political, social, and religious background of the early 
Kentuckians as expressed in their writings; ante bellum literature; the in- 
fluence of the War Between the States; the rise of local color fiction ; the 
revival of poetry; present-day writers and tendencies; ballads; seventeenth 
century survivals in the native idiom; opportunity for students to become 
familiar with the John Wilson Townsend Collection. 

English 321. (Formerly English 37a.) Poetry and Prose of the Romantic 
Period. Three hours. 

Prerequisites: English 101 and 102, and two courses in literature. 

In poetry the rise, development, and culmination of Romanticism; the 
impact of German metaphysics: the development of poetic form in Words- 
worth and Coleridge: the return to the past in Scott and Southey; revolt and 
satire in Byron; Shelley and democratic idealism; Keats and esthetics. In 
prose the development of the essay as a medium of self-expression, literary 
criticism, and social ideals, as exemplified in the writings of Lamb, Coleridge, 
Hazlitt, De Quincey, and Landor. 



RICHMOND, KENTUCKY 113 



English 322. (Formerly English 37b.) Poetry and Prose of the Victorian 
Period. Three hours. 

Prerequisites: English 101 and 102, and two courses in literature. 

Social ideals, political principles, religious conceptions, scientific theories, 
and cultural changes as mirrored in the non-fictional prose of such Victorian 
writers as Macaulay, Carlyle, Newman, Mill, Spencer, Arnold, Huxley, Ruskin, 
Stevenson, and Pater. The poetic cycle from Tennyson to Housman, reflect- 
ing the religious faith and doubt, social reform and unrest, estheticism, and 
skepticism of the period. 

English 325. Literature of the Old Testament. Three hours. 

Prerequisites: English 101 and 102, and two courses in literature. 

The reading of selected writing of the Old Testament for literary appre- 
ciation; the types of Old Testament literature — historical narratives, prophetic 
poetry, religious lyrics, secular lyrics, dramatic poetry, wisdom literature, 
short stories; social and moral ideals revealed: the reading aloud of great 
passages. 

English 327. (Formerly English 39.) Books and the Modern Mind. Two 
hours. 

Prerequisites: English 101 and 102, and two courses in literature. 

Reading and discussion of modern books that have influenced modern 
thought and action; basic concepts of the physical universe, man, and society 
as found in such writers as Darwin, Marx, Frazer, and others: social ap- 
phcations in novels and plays; influence upon forms of literature and art: 
attempts at ethical and religious synthesis. 

English 331. (Formerly English 38a and 38b.) Speech Correction. Three 
hours. 

Prerequisites: English 101, 102, and 131 or 231. 

Diagnostic and remedial procedures for functional disorders; the phonatory 
and articulatory aspects of speech development: analysis of physical and 
mental tests: corrective material and technique; foreign language influence; 
the case record. 

English 421. (Formerly EngUsh 42.) Renaissance and Elizabethan Litera- 
ture. Three hours. 

Prerequisites : English 101 and 102, and two courses in literature. 

Spirit of the Renaissance; influence of Italian and other continental 
literatures; early English humanists; Elizabethan enthusiasm: the Eliza- 
bethan language: new hterary influences; chief literary forms; Spenser and 
Elizabethan poetry: the great sonneteers; Sidney and criticism; Bacon and 
scientific writing: the Shakespearian poetry; Ben Johnson, Drayton, and 
Daniel: prose fiction; EUzabethan drama. 

English 423. (Formerly English 43.) Milton and the Puritan Period. Two 

hours. 

Prerequisites: English 101 and 102, and two courses in literature. 

The Puritan background; life of Milton as it affected his writings; his 
earher poetry; development of his genius; the great epic Paradise Lost and its 
interpretation; Paradise Regained and Samson Agonistes; other writers of 
the period and their writings. 

English 424. (Formerly English 44.) Chaucer and Medieval Story. Two 

hours. 

Prerequisites: English lul and 102, and two courses in hterature. 

Study of the various types of medieval story— the folk-epic, the beast tale, 
the metrical romance, the fabliau, the saint's legend, and the ballad— and of 
the social and moral ideals which they reveal. 



114 EASTERN STATE COLLEGE 



English 425. (Formerly English 45.) The Age of Classicism. Three hours. 

Prerequisites: English 101 and 102, and two courses in literature. 

Social backgrounds of classicism ; Restoration drama as a reaction against 
Puritanism; Dryden and the rise of the critical spirit; French and Graeco- 
Roman influences; the literary dictatorship of Dr. Johnson; the decay of 
literary patronage; new tendencies In Thomson, Cowper, Gray, Chatterton, 
Goldsmith, and Crabbe. 

English 431. (Formerly English 435 and 46.) Interpretative Reading. 
Three hours. 

Prerequisite : English 131 or its equivalent. 

Sources of materials; techniques of interpretation; criteria for selecting 
readings, for preparing contestants and readers, and for judging contests; 
individual work under careful direction. 

English 441. (Formerly English 47.) History of the English Language. 
Three hours. 

Prerequisite : Two years of work in English toward a major or minor in 
English. 

The family of languages; the Old English period; the Middle English 
period; modern English; the foreign and native elements in English; history 
of English vowel sounds ; mutation and gradation; the consonants; English 
inflections ; English accent; collateral readings in the less technical works 
on the English language. 



GRADUATE DIVISION COURSES 

English 511. The Development of English Drama to 1642. Three hours. 

Medieval liturgical drama; early miracle plays and the guild cycles; 
morality plays and interludes; early Tudor Renaissance drama; the develop- 
ment of the theater; companies of actors; Marlowe, Lyly, Greene, Peale, and 
Nashe; Edward De Vere and the Shakespearian drama; Ben Johnson and the 
Stuart dramatists. 

English 515. (Formerly English 52.) English Criticism. Three hours. 

A study of the development of English criticism from its beginnings to 
the end of the nineteenth century. Foreign influences in English criticism; 
changing conceptions of the criteria of criticism; the great critics and their 
works. 

English 565. . (Formerly English 50 and 51.) Problems in High School 
English. Three hours. 

A seminar for graduate students who wish to work on individual problems 
under the direction of an instructor. 



RICHMOND, KENTUCKY 115 



FRENCH 

A student may major in French by taking a minimum of 24 
hours in French. 

A student with a major and a minor in other departments may 
take a minimum of 18 semester hours for a minor in French. 

LOWER DIVISION COURSES 

French 101. (Formerly French 11.) Elementary French. Three hours. 
Pronunciation; grammar; conversation in French on material studied. 

French 102. (Formerly French 12.) Elementary French. Three hours. 
Prerequisite: French 101 or one unit of high school French. 
Continuation of grammar study begun in French 11 and oral work based 
on reading material. 

French 201. (Formerly French 21.) Intermediate French. Three hours. 
Prerequisites: French 101 and 102 or two units of high school French. 
Grammar review; short history of French literature; notable examples of 
the French short story. 

French 202. (Formerly French 22.) Intermediate French. Three hours. 
Prerequisite: French 201 or three units of high school French. 
Grammar review; three French novels. 



UPPER DIVISION COURSES 

(Open to Junior, Senior and Graduate Students) 

French 301. (Formerly French 31.) French Prose Classics. Three hours. 

Prerequisite: Two years of college French or the equivalent. 

Intensive reading of a number of French prose classics with emphasis on 
the language structure; extensive reading of works by representative prose 
writers from the Middle Ages to the nineteenth century. 

French 302. (Formerly French 32.) French Prose Classics. Three hours. 

Prerequisite: French 301 or its equivalent. 

Selected prose works of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. 

French 401. (Formerly French 41.) French Poetry. Three hours. 
Prerequisites: Two years of college French or the equivalent. 
The Medieval Period; the Renaissance; the Golden Age; Romanticism; 
the Parnassus School; Symbolism; contemporary tendencies in poetry. 

French 402. (Formerly French 42.) French Drama. Three hours. 

Prerequisite: French 401 or its equivalent. 

The classical period ; the eighteenth century; Romanticism; modern drama. 



116 EASTERN STATE COLLEGE 



GEOGRAPHY 

(Recommended curriculum for a major in Geography with 
right of teaching certificate) 

First Year 

First Semester Hours Second Semester Hours 

English 101 3 English 102 3 

Geography 101 3 History 142 3 

History 141 3 Library Science 166 1 

Physical Education 110 V2 Physical Education 110 ^'2 

Science 109 or 111 3 Science 110 or 112 3 

Sociology 100 (Women) 1 Elective 6 

Elective ._. 3 

I6V2 161/i 

Second Year 

Education 211 3 English 212 3 

English 211 ..— 3 Geography 202 or 230 2 or 3 

Geography 271 3 Geography 221 3 

Geology 201 3 Physical Education 110 1/2 

Physical Education 110 V2 Physical Education 225 2 

Elective 4 Elective ...6 or 5 

I6V2 I6I/2 

Third Year 

Geography 372 3 Education 383 3 

Geography Elective 3 Geography 373 3 

Health 201 3 Geography 471 3 

Elective 7 Geography 473 3 

Elective 4 

16 16 

Fourth Year 

Geography 305 or 474 2 Education 364 6 

Geography 475 or 477 3 Education 463 10 

Elective 11 

16 16 



Recommended Curriculum for a Minor in Geography 

A student with a major and a minor in other departments may 
take the following courses for a minor in Geography: Geography 
101, 221, 271, 372, 373, 471, and Geology 201. 



RICHMOND, KENTUCKY 117 



GEOGRAPHY 

(Recommended curriculum for a major in Geography without 
right of teaching certificate) 

First Year 

First Semester Hours Second Semester Hours 

EngUsh 101 -- 3 English 102 3 

Geography 101 3 History 142 3 

History 141 3 Library Science 166 1 

Physical Education 110 Vz Physical Education 110 Y2 

Science 109 or 111 3 Science 110 or 112 3 

Sociology 100 (Women) 1 Elective _ 6 

Elective 3 

16 1/2 161/2 

Second Year 

English 211 3 English 212 3 

Geography 271 3 Geography 202 or 230 2 or 3 

Geology 201 3 Geography 221 3 

Physical Education 110 V2 Physical Education 110 V2 

Elective 7 Elective 8 or 7 

I61/2 161/2 

Third Year 

Geography 372 3 Geography 373 3 

Geography Elective 3 Geography 471 3 

Humanities 3 Geography 473 3 

Elective 7 Elective 7 

l7~ 16 



Fourth Year 

Geography 305 or 474 2 Elective .^ 16 

Geography 475 or 477 3 

Elective 11 

16~ 16 



118 EASTERN STATE COLLEGE 

GEOGRAPHY 
LOWER DIVISION COURSES 

Geography 101. (Formerly Geography 10.) Principles of Geography: 
Elements and Factors. Three hours. Fee .75. 

The field of modern geography; earth as a member of the solar system; 
earth's form and movements; geographical elements; elements of weather; 
climates of earth; the biotic factors; the physiographic factors; edaphic and 
pedologic factors; the mineral factors; the hydrographic factors; the spatial 
factors; the social factors; the geographic unit; geographic tools; a brief 
history of the changing aspects of geography. 

Geography 102. Principles of Geography: Regions and Societies of the 
World. Three hours. 

Prerequisite: Geography 101. 

The nature of regional geography; regions of the continents; geographic 
patterns of mankind; population problems; man and his environment; human 
development of races, religions, governments, cultures, industries, institutions, 
occupations and activities; geography of cities; urban and rural groups; 
problems of today and tomorrow. 

Geography 202. (Formerly Geography 20.) Climatology. Three hours. 

Weather and weather observation; elements of climate; climatic regions 
of the world — a study of climate as affected by the physical factors of sun, 
mountains, land and water; changes in temperature, pressure, winds — 
direction and force; humidity; cloud phenomena, precipitation, and the major 
types of storms ; forecasting ; the climatic regions of the world; weather condi- 
tions and their relation to human activities. 

Geography 221. (Formerly Geography 21.) Economic Geography of the 
Industries. Three hours. 

The more important agricultural products — cereals, starch foods, forage 
crops, vegetable crops, fruit crops, wine industries, sugar, vegetable oils, 
condiments and tobacco vegetable fibers, non-food vegetables; the animal 
food stuffs, animal fibers, furs, skins; the mining industries; manufacturers — 
aluminum, automobile, copper, chemical textile, leather, iron and steel, paint, 
petroleum, rubber, etc.; trade routes, inland in North America and in- 
ternational trade routes; world trade centers. 

Geography 230. (Formerly Geography 23.) World Democracy and 
Geopolitics. Two hours. 

Geopolitics; the ideological conflict; backgrounds of nationalism; the 

global war and strategy; social factors; economic factors; political factors; 

physical factors; religion and war; educational impacts; cultural factors; 

health and physical fitness; land and ocean warfare; military factors; 
diplomacy and war; after war, what? 

Geography 271. (Formerly Geography 22.) Geography of Anglo America. 
Three hours. 

Prerequisite: Geography 101. 

This course is a detailed study of the United States, Canada, and Alaska; 
structure and physiography; climate; the geographic regions of these three 
countries, such as the Spring Wheat Region, the Coasts of Newfoundland 
and Labrador, the North Pacific Coast and Mountains, the Yukon Valley, the 
Cotton Belt, the Lower Region, Central California, etc. 



RICHMOND, KENTUCKY 119 

UPPER DIVISION COURSES 

(Open to Junior, Senior and Graduate Students) 

Geography 300. (Formerly Geography 30.) Geography of the South. 
Two hours. 

Prerequisite: Geography 101. 

The South, yesterday and today; the advancing South; the physical land- 
scape; the cultural landscape; the major regions; the people of the South; 
the races and their distribution and problems; transportation facilities; agri- 
culture, its development, its regions, its problems, and possibilities; power 
resources; mineral wealth, forest resources; manufacturing and industries; 
comparison of rural and urban communities of the South; the South's future. 

Geography 305. (Formerly Geography 31.) Economic and Historical 
Geology. Two hours. 

The origin of the earth; genesis of ore deposits; evolution of plants and 
animals; origin of mountains; history and growth of continents; the earth's 
interior; formation and recognition of common rocks and minerals; 
architecture of the earth; geologic time table; the geologic eras; the growth 
of knowledge of the earth ; man's place in nature ; geology in the service of 
man applied to industry and to the larger affairs of men; economic and 
geologic features of minerals. 

Geography 372. (Formerly Geography 32.) Geography of Europe. Three 
hours. 

Prerequisite: Geography 101. 

The general geographic setting of Europe as a whole; the physiography, 
climate, economic and political geography of each of the major countries; 
European trade and commerce; the geographic advantages and handicaps of 
the various European countries that have resulted from the changes in 
boundaries that followed the World Wars. 

Geography 373. (Formerly Geography 33.) Geography of Latin America. 
Three hours. 

Prerequisite: Geography 101. 

International importance of Latin America; growing interest of the 
United States in Latin America ; historical geography of discovery, settlement 
and development; Caribbean resources; the Panama Canal; South America in 
world trade; population distribution; transportation facilities; climatic and 
physiographic regions; economic geography of the Pampas, the Amazon 
Basin, Central Mexican Plateau; the Llanos, Andean Highlands. 

Geography 471. (Formerly Geography 40.) Geography of World Problems. 
Three hours. 

Prerequisite : Six hours of geography. 

Geography and the evolution of nations; the expansion of Europe; 
European influence in world affairs; economic resources; the British Empire 
and its many problems— India, Egypt, Ireland, South Africa; geography and 
problems of major nations of the Orient; Islamism; Russia, past and present; 
Europe in Africa ; the problems of the Far East. 

Geography 473. (Formerly Geography 41.) Geography of Asia. Three 
hours. 

Prerequisite: Geography 101. 

The structure of Asia; the physiography of Asia; the climates of Asia; 
the vegetation of Asia; the population of Asia; the exploration and exploita- 
tion of Asiatic countries by European nations; Asia's position in the world; 
the agricultural resources of Asia; summary of the economic resources of 
Asia; Turkey; Arab Asia; the Iranian Plateau; India, Burma; Ceylon; South- 
eastern Asia; the East Indies; China; Japan; Asiatic Russia; growing interest 



120 EASTERN STATE COLLEGE 



in the United States in Asia; the geographic advantages and disadvantages of 
the continent. 

Geography 474. (Formerly Geography 42.) Geography and Geology of 
Kentucky. Two hours. 

The Kentucky country; geology; surface and drainage; weather and 
climate; native vegetation; native animals: native people; the coming of the 
white man; the soil and its conservation; agriculture; animal industries; 
mineral resources; manufacturing; transportation; location and growth of 
cities: Louisville and the cities of the Ohio Basin: other cities; the counties 
of Kentucky; cultural features of Kentucky — government, education; Ken- 
tucky of the Future. 

Geography 475. (Formerly Geography 43.) Geography of Africa and 
Australia. Three hours. 

Prerequisite: Geography 101. 

Structure; physiography; climate; vegetation; population; exploration; 
exploitation; position in world affairs; agricultural resources; transportation 
facilities; climatic and physiographic regions; foreign trade and foreign 
interests, comparisons and contrasts with other continents ; the geographic 
advantages and disadvantages; changes resulting from the World Wars and 
post-war conditions; present-day problems and their geographic background. 

Geography 477. (Formerly Geography 44.) Conservation of Natural Re- 
sources. Three hours. 

History of the conservation movement; the forest resources; soil deple- 
tion and restoration; the land resources: the fertilizer resources; water origin 
and supply; water power; irrigation and reclamation: navigation; the mineral 
resources; the mineral fuels, coal petroleum, natural gas; the metallic re- 
sources, iron, copper, lead, gold, zinc, aluminum, silver, uranium and radium; 
the human resources; agricultural losses. 

GEOLOGY 

Geology 201. (Formerly Geology 20.) Physical Geography and Geology. 
Three hours. Fee, $1.00. 

Materials of the earth: weathering: work of wind; work of ground water; 
work of streams: work of glaciers; the ocean and its work; the structure of 
the earth; earthquakes; volcanoes and igneous intrusions; metamorphism; 
mountains, and plateaus: ore deposits; soils, their classification and origin; 
major physiographic features, their origin and influence on man. 

GERMAN 
LOWER DIVISION COURSES 

German 101. (Formerly German 11.) Elementary German. Three hours. 

Pronunciation ; Grammar; conversation in German on material studied. 

German 102. (Formerly German 12.) Elementary German. Three hours. 

Prerequisite : German 101 or one unit of high school German. 

Continuation of grammar study begun in German 101 and oral work based 
on reading material. 

German 201. (Formerly German 21.) Intermediate German. Three hours. 

Prerequisites : German 101 and 102 or two units of high school German. 

Grammar review; short history of German literature: notable examples of 
the German short story. 

German 202. (Formerly German 22.) Intermediate German. Three hours. 

Prerequisite: German 201 or three units of high school German. 

Grammar review; three German novels. 



RICHMOND, KENTUCKY 121 

GOVERNMENT 
LOWER DIVISION COURSES 

Government 111. (Formerly Government 10.) American Government. 
Three hours. 

National government; organization of the various departments with their 
functions and operations, political parties, ideals of correct government, rela- 
tion of federal to state and local government. 

Government 112. (Formerly Government 11.) American Government. 
Three hours. 

State and local government; organization, operation, and problems of 
state, county and municipal government; relation of state and local to national 
government. 

UPPER DIVISION COURSES 

(Open to Junior, Senior and Graduate Students) 

Government 351. (Formerly Government 30.) English Government. Two 
hours. 

Prerequisite: Government 111. 

The rise of governmental institutions of England and her influence among 
the nations: kingship; parliament: cabinet; ministry: privy council; Swiss 
system of government and her democracy. 

Government 411. (Formerly Government 40.) International Diplomacy. 
Three hours. 

Prerequisite: Government 111. 

Leading negotiations and treaties among the nations; diplomatic and 
consular affairs in general. 

Government 452. (Formerly Government 41.) Foreign Government. 
Three hours. 

Prerequisite: Government 111. 

Main features of the governments of Germany, France, Italy, and Russia. 

Government 453. (Formerly Government 42.) Principles of Democracy. 
Two hours. 

The theory of democracy; history of democracy; the attack on democracy; 
defense of democracy; leading democratic documents; democracy in the 
present crisis. 

GRADUATE COURSES 

Government 555. (Formerly Government 55.) Political Theory. Three 
hours. 

Political Theory as propounded in Plato, Aristotle, Machiavelli, Grotius, 
Hobbes, Locke, Bodin, Bossuet, Voltaire, Montesquieu, Diderot, Turgot, 
Rousseau. 

Government 556. Political Theory. Two hours. 

Political Theory since Rousseau, as propounded by Wilson, Laski and 
others. 



122 EASTERN STATE COLLEGE 

HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

(Recommended curriculum for a major in Health and Physical 
Education with right of teaching certificate) 

First Year 

First Semester Hours Second Semester Hours 

English 101 3 English 102 3 

Health 100 ..-. 2 History 142 3 

History 141 3 Library Science 166 1 

Physical Education 110 1,2 Physical Education 110 Vt. 

Science 111 3 Science 112 3 

Sociology 100 (Women) 1 Elective 6 

Elective 4 

I6V2 161/2 

Second Year 

Biology 225 3 Biology 229 3 

Education 211 3 Health 201 _ 3 

Health 202 1 Physical Education 110 1/2 

Physical Education 110 1/2 Physical Education 225 2 

Physical Education 220 2 Physical Education 261 (Men) .... 2 

Physical Education 250 (Men) or 

or Physical Education 362 (Men) .... 

Physical Education 251 (Women) 2 Elective 6 

Elective 5 

I6V2 I61/2 

Third Year 

English 211 3 Education 383 3 

Physical Education 252 or English 212 3 

361 (Women) 2 Health 362 2 

Physical Education 300 (Women) 1 Physical Education 345 (Women) 1 

Physical Education 367 1 Physical Education 366 1 

Physical Education 360 or Elective 6 

420 (Men) 2 

Elective 9 or 10 

16 . 16 

Fourth Year 

Education 421b 2 Education 364 6 

Physical Education 401 2 Education 463 10 

Physical Education 468 2 

Elective 10 

16 16 

Students taking a major in Health and Physical Education 
should take a major in another department. It is not recommended 
that one majoring in Health and Physical Education be permitted 
to take two minors. 

Recommended Curriculum for a Second Major in Health 
and Physical Education 

A student with a first major in some other department may 
take the following courses for a second major in Health and Physi- 
cal Education: Health 100, 201, 202, 362; Physical Education 110 
(four semesters), 220, 225, 367, 366, 401, 468. Additional courses for 



RICHMOND, KENTUCKY 123 



men: Physical Education 250, 261 or 362, 360 or 420. Additional 
courses for women: 251, 300, 252 or 361, 345. 

Recommended Curriculum for a Minor in Health and 
Physical Education 

A student with a major and a minor in other departments may- 
take the following courses for a minor in Health and Physicil 
Education: Health 100, 202, 201; Physical Education 220, 225, 367, 
366. Additional courses for men: 250, 360, 420. Additional courses 
for women: 251, 252, 300, 361. 

HEALTH 
LOWER DIVISION COURSES 

Health 100. (Formerly Health 10.) Personal Hygiene. Two hours. 
Correct living habits; desirable health practices; the place of health in 
modern times ; scientific versus unscientific and irrational health practices. 

Health 201. (Formerly Health 26.) Public Hygiene and Safety. Three 
hours. 

Public hygiene and disease prevention; home, school, and community 
sanitation and public health. 

Health 202. (Formerly Health 20.) First Aid to the Sick or Injured. One 
hour. Fee, 75c. 

Meeting emergencies in the schoolroom, on the playground, on the athletic 
field, and in everyday life. The Standard and Advanced Red Cross Cer- 
tificates are awarded to students completing the course. 

Health 231. (Formerly Health 22.) Home Nursing. Three hours. 
First aid and care of sickness in the home. 

UPPER DIVISION COURSES 

(Open to Junior, Senior, and Graduate Students) 

Health 303. (Formerly Health 21.) General Bacteriology. Four hours. 
Fee, $1.50. 

Prerequisites: Chemistry 111 and 112. 

Stains and staining techniques; sterilization; preparation of culture media; 
isolation and identification of bacteria; bacterial control; physical and 
chemical agents; immunity; disease control. 

Health 362. (Formerly Health 32.) Correctives. Two hours. 

Prerequisite: Biology 225. 

Basic, fundamental facts and principles upon which to build a sound 
program of corrective or reconstructive health and physical education. 
Exercises developed and used in this course will be based on anatomical and 
physiological principles, performed by the individual alone or with assistance, 
for the prevention or arrest, the cure or correction, of some definite functional 
or organic disability or deformity. 

Health 365. (Formerly Health 36.) Materials and Methods for Teaching 
Health Education. Two hours. 

General objectives of the health program; health set-ups and practices; 
selection, organization, and use of health materials for primary and inter- 
mediate grades; methods of teaching health. 



124 EASTERN STATE COLLEGE 



HISTORY 

(Recommended curriculum for a major in History with right 
of teaching certificate) 

First Year 

First Semester Hours Second Semester Hours 

English 101 3 English 102 3 

Government 111 3 Government 112 3 

History 141 3 History 142 3 

Physical Education 110 V2 Library Science 166 1 

^Science 109 or 111 3 Physical Education 110 V2 

Sociology 100 (Women) 1 Science 110 or 112 : 3 

Elective 3 Elective - - 3 

I61/2 161/2 

Second Year 

English 211 3 English 212 -- 3 

History 202 3 Health 201 3 

Modern Language 3 History 203 3 

Physical Education 110 Yz Modern Language 3 

Physical Education 225 2 Physical Education 110 V2 

Elective — 5 Elective 4 

I6V2 I6V2 

Third Year 

^Education 211 ; 3 History 344 3 

History 340 -- 3 Elective 13 

Elective 10 

16 16 

Fourth Year 

Education 383 3 Education 364 6 

Elective -13 Education 463 10 

16 16 

Recommended Curriculum for a Second Major in History 

A student with a first major in some other department may 
take the following courses for a second major in History: History 
141, 142, 202, 203, 340, 344, and 6 hours elective. 



Recommended Curriculum for a Minor in History 

A student with a major and a minor in other departments may 
take the following courses for a minor in History: History 141, 142, 
202, 203, and 6 hours elective. 



RICHMOND, KENTUCKY 



125 



HISTORY 

(Recommended curriculum for a major in History without right 
of teaching certificate) 



First Year 



First Semester Hours 

English 101 3 

History 141 3 

Physical Education 110 1,2 

Science 109 or 111 3 

Sociology 100 (Women) 1 

Elective 6 

I6V2 



Second Semester Hours 

English 102 3 

History 142 3 

Library Science 166 : 1 

Physical Education 110 V2 

Science 110 or 112 :. 3 

Elective 6 

161/2 



Second Year 



English 211 3 

Government 111 3 

Modern Language 3 

Physical Education 110 V2 

Elective 7 

I6V2 



English 212 3 

Government 112 3 

Modern Language 3 

Physical Education 110 Yz 

Elective 7 

I6V2 



Third Year 



History 202 3 

Elective 13 



16 



History 203 3 

Elective 13 



16 



Fourth Year 



History 340 3 

Elective 13 



16 



History 344 3 

Electives 13 



16 



RECOMMENDED CURRICULUM FOR A MAJOR 
IN THE AREA OF SOCIAL SCIENCE 

(Recommended curriculum for a major in the area of Social 
Science with right of teaching certificate) 



First Year 



First Semester Hours 

English 101 3 

History 141 --. 3 

Physical Education 110 V2 

Science 109 or 111 3 

Sociology 100 (Women) 1 

Elective — 6 



Second Semester Hours 

English 102 -- 3 

Geography 101 3 

History 142 3 

Library Science 166 1 

Physical Education 110 V2 

Science 110 or 112 3 

Elective — - 3 



16>/2 



I61/2 



126 EASTERN STATE COLLEGE 



Second Year 

English 211 3 English 212 3 

Government 111 3 Government 112 3 

History 202 3 Health 201 _ 3 

Physical Education 225 2 History 203 3 

Physical Education 110 V2 Physical Education 110 V2 

Elective 5 Elective _ 4 

Third Year 

Commerce 230 3 Commerce 231 3 

Education 211 3 History 344 3 

History 340 3 Geography 471 3 

Sociology 331 - 3 Sociology 332 3 

Elective 4 Elective _ _ 4 

16 16 

Fourth Year 

Education 383 3 Education 364 -_ 6 

Elective 13 Education 463 10 

16 16 



RECOMMENDED CURRICULUM FOR A MAJOR 
IN THE AREA OF SOCIAL SCIENCE 

(Recommended curriculum for a major in the area of Social 
Science without right of teaching certificate) 

First Year 

First Semester Hours Second Semester Hours 

English 101 3 English 102 - 3 

History 141 3 Geography 101 3 

Physical Education 110 Vz History 142 3 

Science 109 or 111 .-_. 3 Library Science 166 1 

Sociology 100 (Women) 1 Physical Education 110 V2 

Elective — . 6 Science 110 or 112 3 

Elective - 3 

I6I/2 16»/2 

Second Year 

English 211 3 English 212 3 

Government 111 3 Government 112 3 

History 202 3 History 203 3 

Modern Language or English 131 3 Modern Language or English 231 3 

Physical Education 110 V2 Physical Education 110 — — . V2 

Elective 4 Elective 4 

I61/2 16y2 

Third Year 

Commerce 230 3 Commerce 231 3 

History 340 „ 3 Geography 471 3 

Elective _....10 History 344 __ 3 

Elective _ 7 . 

16 16 

Fourth Year 

Sociology 331 3 Sociology 332 3 

Elective _ 13 Elective 13 

16 16 



RICHMOND, KENTUCKY 127 

HISTORY 
LOWER DIVISION COURSES 

History 141. (Formerly History 10.) History of Western Civilization. 
Three hours. 

Rise of ancient governments; the city state of Greece; Grecian art and 
architecture; the rise of imperial government in Rome; the influence of the 
Roman legal system; the rise of the Church; medieval institutional and 
cultural developments. 

History 142. (Formerly History 11.) History of Western Civilization. 
Three hours. 

Rise of modern states; the Renaissance and Reformation; dynastic and 
international wars; the rise of labor-capital disputes; the rise and develop- 
ment of the socialist party; the World Wars and their aftermath. 

History 202. (Formerly History 21.) American History 1492 to 1865. 
Three hours. 

Discovery, exploration and conquest by nations; colonization; the colonial 
wars; alienation of the colonies from England and eventual revolution; 
establishment of government and rise of a powerful nation; the War of 1812; 
the new nationalism; westward movement; Jacksonian democracy; the 
slavery controversy; Civil war and reconstruction. 

History 203. (Formerly History 22.) American History 1865 to the 
present. Three hours. 

The rise of Industrialism ; problems of the American farmer; social and 
cultural advance; money and the tariff; the last American frontier; America 
as a world power; the World Wars; politics since 1876; recent social develop- 
ments. 

History 205. (Formerly History 25.) Local History Appreciation. Two 
hours. 

Prerequisite: One course in American History. 

Local history, its significance in state and national development; local 
records, county, city, school, church, business, family; county and other local 
histories; biographies and genealogies; diaries, journals, letters, etc.; local 
leaders; sources for writing local history; local historical surveys; excursions 
to historic buildings, ruins, museums, cemeteries. 

History 209. (Formerly History 29.) A Survey of the Global War. Two 
hours. 

Social, economic, and political background of World War II; problems 
brought about by world conflict; the importance of a lasting peace. 

UPPER DIVISION COURSES 

(Open to Junior, Senior, and Graduate Students) 

History 340. (Formerly History 30 and 241.) European History from 1300 
to 1815. Three hours. 

Renaissance; Reformation; rise of the national state and royal absolutism; 
decline of manorialism; rise of capitalism and the mercantile system; the 
British revolutions of the seventeenth century; international rivalries, wars 
of dynastic and territorial aggrandizement; the age of reason and enhghtened 
despotism; the French Revolution and Napoleon. 



128 EASTERN STATE COLLEGE 



History 341. (Formerly History 35.) English History to the Stuarts. 
Three hours. 

The coming of the Anglo-Saxon; advance toward nationality; the Norman 
invasion; English feudalism; the Hundred Years' War; legal and political 
development; the Wars of the Roses and the fall of feudalism and rise of 
Tudor monarchy. 

The Divine Right of James I and Charles I; religious and financial strug- 
gles of the time : parliamentary resistance to the first two Stuarts ; the 
"Roundhead Rebellion"; Charles II; James II and the English Revolution. 

History 342. (Formerly History 37.) English History from 1714 to the 
Present. Three hours. 

Prerequisite : History 35. 

The Hanoverian dynasty; the struggle for empire ; development of 
British Imperialism; parliamentary reforms of the nineteenth century; in- 
fluence of political parties; England's place in the "Parliament of Men." 

History 344. (Formerly History 31.) European History from 1815 to 1914. 
Three hours. 

Intellectual and religious developments; restoration and reaction follow- 
ing the Congress of Vienna; revolutionary and reform movements; national- 
ism; imperialism; political, social, and economic developments in the major 
countries; background of World War I. 

History 347. (Formerly History 40.) Recent and Current World History. 
Two hours. 

The First World War and its consequences : the League of Nations and 
the International Court of Justice; causes of the Second World War; present 
conditions. 

History 348. (Formerly History 38.) Inter-Racial Relations. Three hours. 
Local, national, and international problems brought about by inter-racial 
relations. 

History 349. (Formerly History 34.) Survey of the Far East. Three hours. 

This course centers mainly about China and Japan, with the European 
Nations and America brought in, when their policies lead into the area. 
Some attention is given also to India, Australia and to Islands of the Pacific. 

History 360. (Formerly History 39.) Teaching the Social Studies. Two 
hours. 

Aims and objectives; national committee reports; social studies literature; 
methods of instruction; practical tools of instruction; integration; grade place- 
ment; community resources; evaluation. 

History 405. (Formerly History 44.) History of the American West. 
Three hours. 

Prerequisites: History 21 and 22. 

Significance of the West in American History ; advancement of the 
frontier ; influence of the West on politics; Indian problems; the West of the 
fur trader; the rancher, the miner, and the farmer; communication and 
transportation; the end of the frontier. 

History 406. (Formerly History 45a and 45b.) History of the American 
South. Three hours. 

Settlement; peoples; religions; government; education; social and 
economic conditions; relations with the North and with foreign nations con- 
sequent to slavery; the Civil War; Reconstruction, resumption, and progress 
in all lines. 



RICHMOND, KENTUCKY 129 



History 407. (Formerly History 47.) Recent and Current American 
History. Two hours. 

The onrush of "Big Business"; commerce; expansion; tariff; foreign re- 
lations; imperialism; World Wars and current politics. 

History 440. (Formerly History 41.) Modern Germany from 1789 to the 
Present. Two hours. 

Political, social, economic, and intellectual developments : effects of the 
French Revolution and the Napoleonic Wars; revolutionary movements after 
the Congress of Vienna; formation of the German Empire ; domestic and in- 
ternational developments from 1870 to 1914; World War I; the German Re- 
public and the Hitler Revolution; World War II. 

History 443. (Formerly History 42.) The French Revolution and 
Napoleon. Two hours. 

A survey of the Old Regime with emphasis on the causes of the Revolu- 
tion; a detailed study of the Revolution and the Napoleonic Empire. 

History 446. (Formerly History 48.) Latin American History. Three 
hours. 

A survey of the history of the nations to the south of us, covering the 
period from Columbus to the present; Latin American culture, economics, 
politics, and world interest, with special emphasis on our relations with 
these countries. 

History 447. (Formerly History 43.) History of France Since 1815. Two 
hours. 

The Industrial Revolution and its impact on social and political life; 
religious, intellectual, and cultural trends; reactionary policies of the Restora- 
tion period: the Revolutions of 1830 and 1848; domestic affairs under the 
Second French Empire and the Third French Republic; French nationalism 
and imperialism in relation to Franco-German rivalry; factors in the decline 
of France in recent years. 

History 448a. (Formerly History 55a.) Topics in European History. Two 
hours. 

(Open only to Junior and Senior students majoring and Graduate 
students minoring in History or Social Science.) 

Prerequisites: History 340 and 344. 

Designed to introduce students to the elements of research in the field of 
modern European history. Selection of topics for study will be made on the 
basis of the previous training and special interests of the students par- 
ticipating. A student may take either 448a or 448b and obtain two hours of 
credit without taking the other, or he may take both 448a and 448b and 
obtain a total of four hours of credit. 

History 448b. (Formerly History 55b.) Topics in European History. Two 
hours. 

Prerequisites and description same as for History 448a. 

History 461. (Formerly History 46.) Kentucky History. Three hours. 

General, social, economic, and political history of Kentucky; her in- 
fluence in the development of American democracy; her periods of leader- 
ship in the nation; her educational system; Kentucky's great men and 
women; historical sources of Kentucky. 



130 EASTERN STATE COLLEGE 



GRADUATE COURSES 

History 551. (Formerly History 51.) American Colonial History, 1492-1776. 
Three hours. 

Purpose; To show the foundations of American institutions, political, 
social, and economic. 

History 552. (Formerly History 52.) The American Civil War and Re- 
construction. Three hours. 

To review the political and military administrations of the United States 
and the Confederate States during the war, and to show the political, social, 
and economic effects on the United States as a whole. 

History 555. Intellectual History from Medieval Times to the Era of the 
Industrial Revolution. Two hours. 

History of the basic ideas in Western Civilization from Medieval times 
through the era of the Enlightenment. The basic textual material for the 
course is provided by John Herman Randall's The Making of the Modern 
Mind and Volume I of the source book, Introduction to Contemporary 
Civilization in the West, prepared by the Contemporary Civilization staff of 
Columbia College, Columbia University. 

History 556. Intellectual History since the Era of the Enlightenment. 
Two hours. 

History of the basic ideas in Western Civilization from the era of the 
Enlightenment to the present. The basic textual material for the course is 
provided by John Herman Randall's The Making of the Modern Mind and 
Volume II of the source book, Introduction to Contemporary Civilization, 
prepared by the Contemporary Civilization staff of Columbia College, 
Columbia University. 



RICHMOND, KENTUCKY 131 



HOME ECONOMICS 

(Recommended curriculum, for a major in Vocational Home 
Economics with right of teaching certificate) 

First Year 

First Semester Hours Second Semester Hours 

Art 117 _ 3 Art 217 2 

English 101 3 English 102 3 

Home Economics 101 2 Health 231 3 

Home Economics 204 3 Home Economics 203 3 

Home Economics 102 _... 3 Home Economics Elective 2 

Library Science 166 1 Physical Education 110 Vz 

Physical Education 110 Va Elective 3 

Sociology 100 (Women) 1 

161/2 ISV2 

Second Year 

Chemistry 111 5 Biology 219 or Sociology 331 3 

Commerce 260 or 230 3 Chemistry 112 5 

Education 211 3 Home Economics 215 3 

Home Economics 206 3 Home Economics 222 3 

Home Economics 250 3 Physical Education 110 V2 

Physical Education 110 V2 Elective 2 

171/2 16»/2 

Third Year 

Chemistry 220 4 Biology 219 or Sociology 331 ....- 3 

English 131 or 212 3 Education 304 3 

Health 303 4 Home Economics 301 2 

Home Economics 303 3 Home Economics 306 3 

Home Economics 309 3 Home Economics 330 2 

Home Economics 402 3 

17 16 

Fourth Year 

Home Economics 305 3 Education 364 4 

Home Economics 403 4 Education 463 10 

Home Economics Elective Education 466 3 

(Foods) 3 

Elective 6 

16 17 



132 EASTERN STATE COLLEGE 

HOME ECONOMICS 
LOWER DIVISION COURSES 

Home Economics 100. Personal and Family Problems. Three hours. 

The personal responsibility of the college student to himself and his 
family. Specialists will discuss such topics as: Personality, grooming, place of 
each person in the home and community. 

Home Economics 101. (Formerly Home Economics 10.) Textiles. Two 
hours. 

Physical and chemical characteristics of the various textile fibers; the 
weaves, finishes, durability and care of fabrics; application of scientific 
information to the purchase and use of fabrics. 

Home Economics 102. (Formerly Home Economics 11.) Source, Selection 
and Cost of Foods. Two hours. 

Problems involved in the marketing of foods and in the purchase of 
foods; the foods available for home use; the brands of foods; the amounts of 
foods for family groups. 

Home Economics 155. (Formerly Home Economics 12.) Costume Design. 
Two hours. 

Principles of design as related to the costume; study of line, color, and 
texture in fabrics as related to different types of individuals. 

Home Economics 203. (Formerly Home Economics 20.) Garment Making. 
Three hours. 

Fundamentals of garment construction by means of planning, selecting, 
and purchasing of fabrics; commercial patterns; construction of simple 
garments; hand and machine sewing. 

Home Economics 204. (Formerly Home Economics 21a.) Food Prepara- 
tion. Three hours. 

Composition of foods; the nutritive value of foods; diet in relation to 
health; the fundamental principles involved in the preparation of foods. 
Fee, $2.25. 

Home Economics 205. (Formerly Home Economics 22.) Meal Planning, 
Preparation, and Serving. Three hours. 

Prerequisite: Home Economics 204 or its equivalent. 

The equipment and arrangement of different types of kitchens; the 
preparation of balanced meals; the cost of meals; table service; etiquette; 
hospitality; special entertainments. Fee, $7.50. 

Home Economics 206. (Formerly Home Economics 23.) Dressmaking. 
Three hours. 

Prerequisite : Home Economics 203 or its equivalent. 

Construction of four dresses ; one wool, one silk or rayon, one made-over 
problem; fittings and finishes. 

Home Economics 215. (Formerly Home Economics 21b.) Food Prepara- 
tion. Three hours. 

Emphasis upon different methods of preparing the same food; planning, 
preparing, and serving "Three Meals A Day." Fee, $2.25. 



RICHMOND, KENTUCKY 133 



Home Economics 222. (Formerly Home Economics 24.) Interior Decora- 
tion. Three hours. 

Prerequisite: Art 117. 

Decoration and furnishing for the interior of the house considering the 
style of architecture, cost, durability and use of the house; laboratory work 
on slip covers, curtains, and refinishing furniture. 

Home Economics 250. (Formerly Home Economics 25.) The House, 
Three hours. 

Architecture; house plans; landscaping; materials suitable for building a 
home; financing a home. 

Home Economics 260. (Formerly Home Economics 26.) Food Preserva- 
tion. Two hours. 

Planning a food preservation budget ; laboratory experience in drying, 
salting, pickling, freezing, canning, making preserves and jellies ; experience 
with canning in community canneries. 



UPPER DIVISION COURSES 

(Open to Junior, Senior, and Graduate Students) 

Home Economics 301. (Formerly Home Economics 30.) Household Equip- 
ment. Two hours. 

Standards for judging household equipment; advantages of labor-saving 
devices ; care of equipment. 

Home Economics 302. (Formerly Home Economics 31.) Advanced Cook- 
ery. Three hours. 

Prerequisite: Home Economics 214. 

Scientific principles of cookery through experimentation and variation 
of proportions in recipes; skills and techniques of cookery. Fee, $4.50. 

Home Economics 303. (Formerly Home Economics 32.) The Family. 
Three hours. 

Biological, psychological, social, and economic aspects of family organiza- 
tion. 

Home Economics 305. (Formerly Home Economics 34.) Tailoring. Three 
hours. 

Prerequisites : Home Economics 203 and 206. 

Experience in handling of woolen fabrics ; principles involved in tailoring 
a coat and a suit. 

Home Economics 306. (Formerly Home Economics 35.) Advanced Nutri- 
tion. Three hours. 

Prerequisites: Chemistry 220 and Biology 219. 

Food nutrients and functions in the body. Construction of an adequate 
diet for persons under varying economic and social conditions. 

Home Economics 308. (Formerly Home Economics 37.) Advanced 
Textiles. Two hours. 

Prerequisite: Home Economics 101. 

The advanced study of textile fibers; chemical test. 



134 EASTERN STATE COLLEGE 



Home Economics 309. (Formerly Home Economics 38.) Consumer 
Problems. Three hours. 

Consumer problems today; guides to buying and standardization of house- 
hold goods. 

Home Economics 310. Nutrition for the Elementary Teacher. Two hours. 

The fundamentals of nutrition. The importance of good nutrition to the 

child. Ways to interest the child in good nutrition. Results of good nutrition. 

Home Economics 330. (Formerly Home Economics 33.) Introduction to 
Home Management. Two hours. 

Prerequisites: Home Economics 204 and 215. 

Economic and scientific factors which influence home living ; time, labor, 
finance, sanitation, and household servant problems. 

Home Economics 401. (Formerly Home Economics 40.) Dietetics. Three 
hours. 

Prerequisites: Home Economics 204, 215, 306, Chemistry 220, Biology 219. 

Nutritive value of common foods; essentials of adequate diet; human 
nutrition applied to feeding individuals in health and disease. 

Home Economics 402. (Formerly Home Economics 41.) Child Develop- 
ment. Three hours. 

Prerequisite: Education 211. 

Care necessary for physical, mental, emotional, and social development of 
the child from infancy through adolescence ; observation of children. 

Home Economics 403. (Formerly Home Economics 43.) Home Manage- 
ment. Four hours. 

Prerequisite : Home Economics 330. 

Reservations for appointment to live in the Home Management House 
should be made several weeks prior to the beginning of the quarter. 

Improvement of skills in the management of time, money, and energy; 
meal planning; food buying; preparation and serving of meals; cleaning; 
laundry. Family relationships, etiquette, and hospitality are emphasized. 

Home Economics 405. (Formerly Home Economics 44.) Institutional 
Maitagement. Six hours. 

Organization, management, and equipment of institutions such as tea 
rooms, cafeteria, and hotel dining rooms; trips to visit large eating places, 
hotels, and school cafeterias. College cafeteria used as a laboratory. 

Home Economics 455. (Formerly Home Economics 42.) Advanced Costume 
and Design. Three hours. 

Prerequisites: Home Economics 155 and Art 117. 

The application of art principles in color and line, in designing and con- 
struction of garments. 



RICHMOND, KENTUCKY 135 



INDUSTRIAL ARTS 

(Recommended curriculum for a major in the area of Indus- 
trial Arts with right of teaching certificate) 

First Year 

First Semester Hours Second Semester Hours 

English 101 3 English 102 3 

History 202 „ 3 History 203 3 

Industrial Arts 100 3 Industrial Arts 141 3 

Industrial Arts 191 3 Industrial Arts 150 3 

Library Science 166 1 Physical Education 110 Vs 

Physical Education 110 V2 Science 110 3 

Science 109 3 

I6V2 ISVa 

Second Year 

Art 117 _ .._. 3 Education 211 ". 3 

English 211 3 English 212 3 

Health 202 2 Health 201 - 3 

Industrial Arts 242 3 Industrial Arts 233 2 

Industrial Arts 292 3 Industrial Arts 382 3 

Mathematics 107 3 Mathematics 113 3 

Physical Education 110 V2 Physical Education 110 Va 

171/2 I7V2 

Third Year 

Art 260 .-__ 3 Chemistry 111 5 

Industrial Arts 343 3 Education 383 3 

Industrial Arts 361 2 Industrial Arts 466 2 

Industrial Arts 394 3 Industrial Arts 487 3 

Physics 131 5 Industrial Arts Elective 2 

Physical Education 225 2 

16 17 

Fourth Year 

Art Elective - 3 Education 364 6 

Industrial Arts Elective 10 Education 463 10 

Elective 3 

16 16 



Recommended Curriculum for a First Major in 
Industrial Arts 

A student may take the following courses for a first major in 
Industrial Arts and other departmental courses for a second major 
or minors and to meet general requirements for a teaching certif- 
icate: Industrial Arts 100, 191, 141, 180, 233, 242, 292, 382, 361, 466, 
and 3 hours elective. 



136 EASTERN STATE COLLEGE 

Recommended Curriculum for a Second Major in 
Industrial Arts 

A student with a first major in some other department may- 
take the following courses for a second major in Industrial Arts: 
Industrial Arts 100, 191, 141, 180, 242, 361, 382, and 4 hours elective. 

Recommended Curriculum for a Minor in Industrial Arts 

A student with a major and a minor in other departments may- 
take the following courses for a minor in Industrial Arts: Industrial 
Arts 100, 191, 141, 180, and 6 hours elective. 



INDUSTRIAL ARTS 
LOWER DIVISION COURSES 

Industrial Arts 100. (Formerly Industrial Arts 10.) General Shop. Three 
hours. 

Introductory course involving basic units in drawing, woodworking, 
metalworking, finishing, and electricity; projects and exercises in each 
activity. Fee, $1.50. 

Industrial Arts 141. (Formerly Industrial Arts 11.) Elementary Cabinet 
Construction. Three hours. 

Basic woodworking course including instruction in common hand tools, 
elementary wood turning, finishing, characteristics of common cabinet wooas, 
and processing of lumber for industrial use. Fee, $1.50. 

Industrial Arts 180. (Formerly Industrial Arts 26 and 280.) General 
Metalworking. Three hours. 

Operation and information units in bench metal, sheet metal, forging, 
heat treating, art metal, oxyacetylene welding, and blueprint reading; practice 
in construction of representative projects. Fee, $1.50. 

Industrial Arts 191. (Formerly Industrial Arts 13.) Elementary Mechanical 
Drawing. Three hours. 

A beginning course stressing lettering, orthographic projection, pictorial 
representation, tracing, and blueprinting. Fee, $1.50. 

Industrial Arts 222. (Formerly Industrial Arts 16.) Primary Handicraft. 
Two hours. 

Typical forms of industrial arts applicable to conditions in the elementary 
school. Fee, $1.50. 

Industrial Arts 233. (Formerly Industrial Arts 15.) Elementary Industrial 
Arts Design. Two hours. 

Prerequisite : Industrial Arts 191. 

Basic principles of design; application of design to products of industrial 
craftsmanship; period styles of furniture. Fee, $1.50. 

Industrial Arts 235. (Formerly Industrial Arts 22.) Advanced Industrial 
Arts Design. Two hours. ' ' ^'"' = 

Prerequisite: Industrial Arts 233. 

Application of the fundamentals of design through production:. of plana,; 
furniture rods, and designs representative of the various industrial arts 
activities. Fee, $1.50. 



RICHMOND, KENTUCKY 137 



Industrial Arts 240. (Formerly Industrial Arts 24a.) Pattern Making. 
Two hours. 

Use of woodworking tools and machines common to pattern making ; con- 
struction of patterns involving principles of shrinkage, draft, finish, warp, 
cores; the use of patterns in the foundry. Fee, $1.50. 

Industrial Arts 242. (Formerly Industrial Arts 21.) Intermediate Cabinet 
Construction. Three hours. 

Prerequisite: Industrial Arts 141. 

Advanced hand woodworking units; operation of common woodworking 
machines; care and sharpening of tools ; related information : construction and 
finishing of furniture projects. Fee, $1.50. 

Industrial Arts 249. (Formerly Industrial Arts 14.) Wood finishing and 
Decoration. Two hours. 

Prerequisite: Industrial Arts 100 or 141. 

Preparation of surface for finishing, staining, sealing, and filhng : use of 
varnish, shellac, and lacquer; finishing abrasives and rubbing; refinishing of 
furniture. Fee, $1.50. 

Industrial Arts 282. (Formerly Industrial Arts 24b.) Foundry. Two hours. 
Study of molding materials, tools, and equipment; molding operations; 
making and setting cores: metals; melting and pouring. Fee, $1.50. 

Industrial Arts 283. (Formerly Industrial Arts 27.) Arc and Oxyacetylene 
Welding. Two hours. 

Practice in basic welding processes; horizontal, incline, and overhead 
welding: characteristics of metals. Fee, $1.50. 

Industrial Arts 292. (Formerly Industrial Arts 20.) Elementary Machine 
Drawing. Three hours. 

Prerequisite: Industrial Arts 191. 

The making of detail and assembly drawings: forms of bolts, nuts, thread, 
and conventions; problems from pictorial drawings with dimensions: tabular 
data; sketches from actual parts. Fee, $1.50. 

Industrial Arts 293. (Formerly Industrial Arts 23.) Advanced Mechanical 
Drawing. Three hours. 

Prerequisite : Industrial Arts 233. 

Special emphasis on technique; drawings correlated with shopwork. Fee, 
$1.50. '' 

Industrial Arts 294. (Formerly Industrial Arts 28.) House Planning. Two 
hours. 

Planning a residence with floor plans, elevations, details, and specifications; 
orders of architecture; common styles of homes; building materials. Fee, $1.50. 



UPPER DIVISION COURSES 

(Open to Junior, Senior, and Graduate Students) 

Industrial Arts 303. (Formerly Industrial Arts 30.) Shop Planning and 
Equipment. Two hours. 

Types of industrial school shops; shop planning; machinfe" aind tool 
specifications; design of shop furniture; selection of supplies. 



138 EASTERN STATE COLLEGE 



Industrial Arts 323. (Formerly Industrial Arts 32.) Weaving and Up- 
holstering. Two hours. 

Prerequisite : Industrial Arts 100 or 141. 

Upholstering plain surfaces and frame structures ; upholstering with 
springs; renovation; caning; split and fiber weaving; materials; tools, and 
tool processes. Fee, $1.50. 

Industrial Arts 326. (Formerly Industrial Arts 29.) Elementary Crafts. 
Three hours. 

Instruction and practice in jewelry making, wood carving, and the work- 
ing of plastics. Fee, ^1.50. 

Industrial Arts 343. (Formerly Industrial Arts 31a.) Advanced Cabinet 
Construction I. Three hours. 

Prerequisite: Industrial Arts 242. 

Advanced projects involving skill in the use of machines and hand tools; 
additional practice in woodworking, reeding, fluting, carving, inlaying, veneer- 
ing, dovetailing; study of industrial furniture processes. Fee, $1.50. 

Industrial Arts 344. (Formerly Industrial Arts 33.) Wood Turning. Three 
hours. 

Prerequisite: Industrial Arts 242. 

Common wood turning problems ; sharpening of tools ; operations in 
spindle turning, faceplate turning, and chuck turning ; finishing and polishing. 
Fee, $1.50. 

Industrial Arts 345. (Formerly Industrial Arts 31b.) Advanced Cabinet 
Construction II. Three hours. 

Continuation of Industrial Arts 343 with increased emphasis on craftsman- 
ship and the development of a high degree of skill in furniture construction. 
Fee, $1.50. 

Industrial Arts 361. (Formerly Industrial Arts 36.) Organization of Sub- 
ject Matter in Industrial Arts. Two hours. 

Organization of subject matter for teaching industrial arts in the junior 
and senior high schools; objectives of industrial arts; analysis of subject mat- 
ter; organization of jobs; lesson plans; teaching devices. 

Industrial Arts 382. (Formerly Industrial Arts 34.) Machine Shop 
Practice I. Three hours. 

Prerequisite: Industrial Arts 180. 

Operation of the lathe, shaper, milling machine, drill press, and surface 
grinder; basic operations and related information; blueprint reading; projects 
made involving basic instructional units. Fee, $1.50. 

Industrial Arts 383. (Formerly Industrial Arts 35.) Art Metal Work. 
Three hours. 

Prerequisite : Industrial Arts 180. 

Skill in working with non-ferrous metals and mild steel; operations in 
laying out, raising, planishing, chasing, etching, forming, spinning, turning, 
and finishing metals ; bending, twisting, drilling, riveting, and welding in 
ornamental iron; casting projects of non-ferrous metals. Fee, $1.50. 

Industrial Arts 385. (Formerly Industrial Arts 25.) Sheet Metal Work. 
Three hours. 

Prerequisite : Industrial Arts 180. 

Care and use of the common sheet metal tools and machines; making of 
layouts; templates; projects involving soldering, seaming, punching, riveting, 
forming, and spot welding. Fee, $1.50. 



RICHMOND, KENTUCKY 139 



Industrial Arts 394. (Formerly Industrial Arts 37.) Elementary Archi- 
tectural Drawing. Three hours. 

Prerequisite: Industrial Arts 191. 

Lettering; elements of architecture; mouldings; modeling; shades and 
shadows; wash work; rendering; elementary design. Fee, $1.50. 

Industrial Arts 395. (Formerly Industrial Arts 39.) Carpentry. Six 
hours. 

Problems in small home construction; form building ; framing; masonry; 
electrical wiring; interior finishing; painting; practice in actual construction. 

Industrial Arts 401. (Formerly Industrial Arts 40.) Problems in In- 
dustrial Arts. Two or Four hours. 

A course for seniors and graduate students in which problems of special 
interest and value to the student will be studied. 

Industrial Arts 444. (Formerly Industrial Arts 41.) Machine Woodwork- 
ing. Two hours. 

Prerequisite: Industrial Arts 242. 

Special machine operations ; repairing and servicing of power wood- 
working machinery. Fee, $1.50. 

Industrial Arts 464. (Formerly Industrial Arts 42.) History of Industrial 
Education. Two hours. 

The history of industrial education from its early beginning to the present; 
the contribution of leaders and movements to the development of industrial 
arts and vocational education; legislation for vocational education and the 
State Plan. 

Industrial Arts 466. (Formerly Industrial Arts 46.) Teaching of Industrial 
Arts. Two hours. 

Problems of teaching industrial arts; methods of presentation; instruc- 
tional aids; shop management; demonstration lessons; grading student achieve- 
ment. 

Industrial Arts 487. (Formerly Industrial Arts 44.) Machine Shop Prac- 
tice II. Three hours. 

Prerequisite : Industrial Arts 382. 

Continuation of Industrial Arts 382 with increased emphasis on machine 
tool operations : gear cutting, tool and cutter grinding ; problems in tool mak- 
ing; source, characteristics, and use of the common metals. Fee, $1.50. 

Industrial Arts 488. (Formerly Industrial Arts 45.) Machine Shop Practice 
III. Three hours. 

Prerequisite : Industrial Arts 487. 

Practice in advanced machine processes and tool making; heat treating of 
different metals; organization of project material; related information. 
Fee, $1.50. 

Industrial Arts 496. (Formerly Industrial Arts 47.) Advanced Archi- 
tectural Drawing. Three hours. 

Prerequisite : Industrial Arts 394. 

Student, with instructors approval, will select a major projet and make 
suitable esquisse and rendu of same. Fee, $1.50. 



140 EASTERN STATE COLLEGE 

LATIN 

Major — A minimum of 24 semester hours to be selected. 
Minor — A minimum of 18 semester hours to be selected. 

LOWER DIVISION COURSES 

Latin 101. (Formerly Latin 115 and 10.) Elementary Latin. Three hours. 

Pronunciation; declension of nouns, adjectives, and pronouns; indicatives; 
infinitives; simple uses of subjunctive of verbs; acquisition of the funda- 
mental principles of the language ; ability to yead simple Latin prose dealing 
with Roman home life, mythology, and Roman history. 

Latin 102. (Formerly Latin 116 and 11.) Elementary Latin. Three hours. 

Prerequisite: One unit of high school Latin or Latin 101. 

Caesar and a wide range of authors of equal difficulty; vocabulary, inflec- 
tion, syntax, and their application to English; collateral reading on Roman 
history and society ; training in the understanding of Latin in the Latin order. 

Latin 201. (Formerly Latin 12.) Selections from Cicero and Ovid. Three 
hours. 

Prerequisite: Two units of high school Latin or Latin 102. 

Selections from the works of Cicero, Ovid, Pliny, and others; continued 
emphasis on mastery of vocabulary and syntax; emphasis on the relation of 
Latin to English; comparison of the government of the Roman Republic to 
that of democracies of the present day. 

Latin 202. (Formerly Latin 205 and 13.) Selection from Vergil's Aeneid. 
Three hours. 

Prerequisite: Two or three units of high school Latin or Latin 201. 

Selections from Aeneid of Vergil; study of the Augustan age; study of 
metrical form and structure of the poem; continued emphasis on Latin in- 
flections and constructions. 

UPPER DIVISION COURSES 

(Open to Junior, Senior, and Graduate Students) 

Latin 301. (Formerly Latin 15.) Selections from Livy. Three hours. 

Prerequisite: Three units of high school Latin or the equivalent. 

Survey of Roman history from the foundation of Rome to the close of the 
second Punic War; assigned readings from such historians as Mommsen, Heit- 
land, and others; comparative study of Rome and Carthage; critical study of 
Livy's style, 

Latin 302. (Formerly Latin 16.) Selections from Horace. Three hours. 

Prerequisite : Three units of high school Latin or the equivalent. 

Selected odes, epodes, and satires from Horace; study of the Augustan 
age frorn both a literary and political point of view ; study of Horace's 
philosophy; various meters employed by Horace. 

Latin 303. (Formerly Latin 22.) The Writing of Latin Prose. Three hours. 
Prerequisite: Latin 301 or the equivalent. 

Selections from the text, "Arnold's Latin Prose"; review of syntax, sight 
reading. 



RICHMOND, KENTUCKY 141 



Latin 304. (Formerly Latin 23.) The Latin Dramatists. Three hours. 
Prerequisite : Latin 301 or the equivalent. 

Dramas of Plautus, Terrence, and Seneca; two plays of Plautus for in- 
tensive study; rapid reading of other representative plays. 

Latin 401. (Formerly Latin 41.) Latin Prose of the Silver Age. Three 
hours. 

Prerequisite : Latin 302 or the equivalent. 

Letters of Pliny the Younger; selections from the writings of Tacitus. 

Latin 402. (Formerly Latin 32.) Satire and Epigram. Three hours. 

Selected satires of Juvenal; selected epigrams of Martial; development of 
satire in Latin literature with assignments from Horace ; satire in English ; 
epigram as a literary expression. 

Latin 403. (Formerly Latin 31.) Latin Literature of the Early Empire. 
Three hours. 

Prerequisite : Latin 302 or the equivalent. 

The Oxford University Press text — selections compiled by A. C. B. Brown. 
The selections form a connected and contemporaneous discussion of politics, 
education, literature, philosophy, social types, and town and country life. 

Latin 404. (Formerly Latin 30.) Literature of the Late Republic. Three 
hours. 

Prerequisite; Latin 302 or the equivalent. 

Selections from the works of Caesar, Sallust, Nepos, and Cicero with 
emphasis on Ciceronian prose as a basis of much of the thinking and writing 
since his day; selections from works of poets of this age with emphasis on the 
works of Catullus and Lucretius. 

Latin 405. (Formerly Latin 42.) Roman Private Life. Three hours. 
Lectures, discussions, and readings on Roman family, home, marriage, 
education, clothing, food, amusements, travel, religion, town and country life. 



LIBRARY SCIENCE 
LOWER DIVISION COURSES 

Library Science 166. (Formerly Library Science 10.) Library Orientation. 
One hour. 

Discussion of the card catalog; library plans; principles of classification; 
mechanical make-up of the books; reference books; indexes; bibliographies; 
printed aids in book sections. 



142 EASTERN STATE COLLEGE 



MATHEMATICS 

(Recommended curriculum for a major in Mathematics with 
right of teaching certificate) 

First Year 

First Semester Hours Second Semester Hours 

English 101 3 English 102 3 

History 141 3 Health 201 3 

Library Science 166 1 History 142 3 

Mathematics 107 3 Mathematics 108 2 

Physical Education 110 V2 Mathematics 113 3 

Sociology 100 (Women) 1 Physical Education 110 V2 

Elective 5 Elective 2 

I6V2 I6V2 

Second Year 

English 211 3 English 212 3 

Mathematics 232 3 Mathematics 251 5 

Physical Education 110 V2 Physical Education 110 V2 

Physical Education 225 2 Physics 202 5 

Physics 201 5 Elective — 3 

Elective 3 

I6V2 I61/2 

Third Year 

Education 211 3 Education 383 3 

Mathematics 352 3 Mathematics 467 3 

Elective ..— „ 10 *Mathematics Elective 3 

Elective 7 

16 16 

Fourth Year 

♦Mathematics Elective 3 Education 364 ._.. 6 

Elective 13 Education 463 10 

16 16 



* Electives to be taken from Mathematics 321, 334, 407, 453, 454, 455. 

Recommended Curriculum for a Second Major in 
Mathematics 

A student with a first major in some other department may 
take the following courses for a second major in Mathematics: 
Mathematics 107, 108, 113, 232, 251, 352, and two courses from the 
following: Mathematics 321, 334, 453, 454, 455, 467. 

Reconiinended Curriculum for a Minor in Mathematics 

A student with a major and a minor in other departments may 
take the following courses for a minor in Mathematics: Mathematics 
107, 108, 113, 232, 251, 352. 



RICHMOND, KENTUCKY 143 



MATHEMATICS 

(Recommended curriculum for a major in Mathematics without 
right of teaching certificate) 

First Year 

First Semester Hours Second Semester Hours 

English 101 3 English 102 3 

History 141 3 History 142 3 

Library Science 166 1 Mathematics 108 2 

MathematLCS 107 3 Mathematics 113 3 

Physical Education 110 V2 Physical Education 110 Yz 

Sociology 100 (Women) 1 Elective — 5 

Elective ._ 5 

I6V2 161/2 

Second Year 

English 211 3 Enghsh 212 3 

Mathematics 232 3 Mathematics 251 5 

Physical Education 110 V2 Physical Education 110 V2 

Physics 201 5 Physics 202 5 

Elective 5 Elective 3 

Third Year 

English Elective 3 *Mathematics Elective 3 

Mathematics 352 3 Elective 13 

Elective .10 

16 16 

Fourth Year 

♦Mathematics Elective 3 *Mathematics Elective 3 

Elective 13 Elective 13 

16 16 



MATHEMATICS AND ASTRONOMY 
LOWER DIVISION COURSES 

Mathematics 101. Arithmetic. One hour. 

This course is only for students showing deficiencies in arithmetic as 
determined by a preliminary test. 

The decimal system of notation; the fundamental operations applied to 
whole numbers and common fractions : decimal fractions : units of measure- 
ment; ratio and proportion; percents; simplified computation. 

Mathematics 102. Intermediate Algebra. One hour. 

This course is only for students showing deficiencies in algebra as de- 
termined by a preliminary test, that would indicate their inability to carry 
on the work in Mathematics 107. 

Signed numbers: fundamental operations; equations and stated problems; 
factoring; fractions; exponents, roots and radicals; graphical methods; quad- 
ratic equations. 



• Electives to be taken from Mathematics 321, 334, 407, 453, 454, 455. 



144 EASTERN STATE COLLEGE 



Mathematics 107. (Formerly Mathematics 10.) College Algebra I. Three 
hours. 

Review of high school algebra: exponents and radicals; functions and their 
graphs; equations and their solutions; systems of linear and quadratic equa- 
tions; ratio and proportion; progressions. 

Mathematics 108. (Formerly Mathematics H.) College Algebra II. Two 
hours. 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 107. 

Mathematical induction; binomial theorem; theory of equations; permuta- 
tions; combinations; probability; determinants; partial fractions. 

Mathematics 113. (Formerly Mathematics 12.) Trigonometry. Three 
hours. 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 107. 

The trigonometric functions; logarithms; right triangle; radian measure; 
properties of the trigonometric functions; functions of two angles ; the oblique 
triangle ; the inverse trigonometric functions. 

Mathematics 120. Mathematics in Agriculture. Three hours. 

This course is open only to Agricultural Students. 

Mathematical operations; percentage; equations; lengths, areas, and 
volumes; the right triangle and trigonometry; averages; graphs; special ap- 
plications of practical measurements; exponents; logarithms; the slide rule. 

Mathematics 131. (Formerly Mathematics 20, 231.) Solid Geometry. 
Three hours. 

Fundamental propositions, problems, and exercises of solid geometry. 

Mathematics 232. (Formerly Mathematics 21.) Analytic Geometry. Three 
hours. 

Prerequisites : Mathematics 108, 113. 

Graphs and loci; polar coordinates; straight line; circle; conic sections; 
general equation of the second degree; elements of solid analytic geometry. 

Mathematics 251. (Formerly Mathematics 22 and 23.) Differential Calculus. 
Five hours. 

Prerequisite : Mathematics 232. 

Variables; functions; differentiation; applications of the derivative: suc- 
cessive differentiation; parametric and polar equations and roots; differen- 
tials: curvature; theorem of mean value and its applications; series; ex- 
pansions of functions; partial differentiation; integration by elementary forms. 



UPPER DIVISION COURSES 

(Open to Junior, Senior, and Graduate Students) 

Mathematics 321. (Formerly Mathematics 30.) General Astronomy. 
Three hours. 

Development of astronomy as a science; development of the solar system; 
astronomical instruments ; better known facts of astronomy. 

Mathematics 334. (Formerly Mathematics 34.) College Geometry. Three 
hours. 

Prerequisite; Mathematics 232. 

Geometric constructions; properties of the triangle; transversals; harmonic 
properties of circles. 



RICHMOND, KENTUCKY 145 



Mathematics 352. (Formerly Mathematics 32.) Integral Calculus. Three 
hours. 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 251. 

Integration; constant of integration; definite integral; integration as a 
process of summation ; centroids; fluid pressure; other applications and 
multiple integrals. 

Mathematics 407. (Formerly Mathematics 33.) Theory of Equations. 
Three hours. 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 251 or enrollment in Mathematics 251. 

Graphs; complex numbers; cubic equations; quartic equations; de- 
terminants and symmetric functions. 

Mathematics 453. (Formerly Mathematics 41.) Differential Equations. 
Three hours. 

Prerequisite : Mathematics 352. 

Differential equations of the first order; applications; singular solutions; 
linear equations with constant coefficients; miscellaneous methods for solving 
equations of higher order than the first; integration in series; total dif- 
ferential equations. 

Mathematics 454. (Formerly Mathematics 42.) Advanced Calculus. Three 
hours. 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 352. 

Indeterminate forms; power series; partial differentiation; implicit 
functions and applications to geometry. 

Mathematics 455. Theoretical Mechanics. Three hours. 
Same as Physics 455. 

Mathematics 467. (Formerly Mathematics 46.) Teaching of High School 
Mathematics. Three hours. 

Prerequisite: Ten hours of college mathematics or consent of Head of the 
Department. 

Aims of high school mathematics; importance of high school mathematics; 
history of mathematics; problems of teaching applied to mathematics; methods 
of teaching algebra, plane and solid geometry, trigonometry, and high school 
arithmetic, selection of problems ; types of examinations and their importance; 
class instruction as applied to mathematics; importance of assignment and 
methods of study. 



Eastern — 6 








R. O. T. C. 



RICHMOND, KENTUCKY 147 



MILITARY SCIENCE AND TACTICS 

The primary mission of the Reserve Officers Training Corps is 
to produce junior officers who have the qualities and attributes 
essential to their progressive continued development as officers in 
the Army of the United States. 

The secondary mission is to give educational training, which 
through the years, has been found distinctly valuable by college 
students who have taken the course. 

As an essential element of military training, certain details of 
conduct are stressed, in order that, upon completion of his training, 
the student may be well disciplined in mind and body. The particu- 
lar methods employed by the military department are but a means 
to an end. The basic aim is to cultivate in each student habits of 
cheerful and unquestioning response to proper authority, loyalty, 
patriotism, self-control, precision, and alertness. These qualities, 
together with professional knowledge and experience in command, 
develop leadership and personality, both valuable in peace and war. 

The Federal Government supports military training (ROTC) 
by providing uniforms or their money equivalent; by detailing in- 
structors and maintenance personnel from the Regular Army; by 
furnishing army equipment; and in the case of advanced students, 
by monthly money payments determined annually. ROTC training 
is given by the College under the regulations and supervision of 
the War Department. Credit towards graduation is allowed as for 
other college courses. 

ROTC training contemplates four years of work. The complete 
course is divided into two parts; the BASIC course and the 
ADVANCED course, each of four semesters duration. Having en- 
rolled in either course, a student will be required to complete the 
course, unless he is released by proper authority or leaves school. 

To be eligible for enrollment in the ROTC, students must be 
citizens of the United States and must pass a physical examination. 
Special recognition for service in the armed forces is given to vet- 
erans of World War II. To students who have had over six months 
but less than one y^ar of military service, credit may be given for 
the first year basic course, in which case, the student is eligible 
for enrollment in the second year basic course. Students having 
had one year or more of service may be credited with the entire 
two-year basic course, in which case they will be eligible for en- 
rollment in the first year advanced course. The military service 
referred to herein must have been performed prior to March 2, 
1946. 

Enrollment for the basic course is voluntary and does not in 
itself obligate the student for active military service. Upon com.- 



148 EASTERN STATE COLLEGE 

pletion of the course the student will receive a certification of the 
training received. 

Enrollment for the Advanced Course is voluntary. By so en- 
rolling, the student obligates himself upon completion of the course 
to accept a commission as a Second Lieutenant of Artillery in the 
Officers Reserve Corps. 

Allowances and Cost — Students enrolling in the basic course 
receive no cash allowance but are issued a uniform for their per- 
sonal wear. A deposit of five (5) dollars is required on these items 
to cover possible loss or damage not due to ordinary wear and tear. 
The deposit is returned to students at the end of the school term 
or upon return of the articles of uniform. 

A student who enrolls in the advanced course receives a daily 
subsistence allowance (approximately $0.79 per day) for the dura- 
tion of his enrollment in the course, exclusive of the camp period, 
amounting to about $400.00. An officers' type uniform, complete 
with overcoat, shoes, shirts and cap, is furnished free of cost to each 
of these students on a loan basis. 

Between the first and second year advanced course the student 
is required to attend a training camp of approximately six weeks 
duration. He receives travel pay from his home or school to camp 
and return, at the rate of five cents per mile. He is given free 
medical attention, fed, clothed, and, in addition, is paid at the rate 
of seventy-five (75) dollars per month while there. During the camp 
the student puts into practice what he has learned during his in- 
struction in the school ROTC unit. Any emoluments mentioned 
above are in addition to benefits received through the "G. I. Bill 
of Rights." 



MILITARY SCIENCE 
LOWER DIVISION COURSES 

Military Science 101. Introduction to Military Science. Two hours. 
National Defense Act and ROTC; military organization; maps and aerial 
photographs; leadership, drill and exercise of command. 

Military Science 101a. Basic course in Military Band. Two hours. 

Military Science 102. Basic Military Training. Two hours. 
Prerequisite: Military Science 101. 

Hygiene and first aid; individual weapons and marksmanship; leadership, 
drill and exercise of command. 

Military Science 102a. Basic course in Military Band. Two hours. 
Prerequisite : Military Science 101a. 



RICHMOND, KENTUCKY 149 



Military Science 201. Basic Military Training. Two hours. 
Prerequisite : Military Science 102. 

Physical development methods; military administration; military law and 
boards; leadership, drill and exercise of command. 

Military Science 201a. Basic Course in Military Band. Two hours. 
Prerequisite : Military Science 102a. 

Military Science 202. Basic Military Training. Two hours. 
Prerequisite: Military Science 201. 

Evolution of warfare; maps and aerial photographs; leadership, drill and 
exercise of command. 

Military Science 202a. Basic course in Military Band. Two hours. 
Prerequisite: Military Science 201a. 



UPPER DIVISION COURSES 

(Open to students who have completed the Basic Course and to 
veterans with at least twelve months of military service.) 

Military Science 301. First Year Advanced Military Training. Four hours. 

Prerequisites: Basic courses or in case of veterans, at least twelve months 
of military service. 

Geographical foundations of national power; military leadership, psy- 
chology, and personnel management ; military law and boards ; artillery 
tactics and technique; leadership, drill and exercise of command. 

Military Science 302. First Year Advanced Military Training. Four hours. 

Prerequisite : Military Science 301. 

Artillery tactics and technique; leadership, drill and exercise of command. 

Military Science 401. Second Year Advanced Military Training. Four 
hours. 

Prerequisite : Military Science 302. 

Command and staff; psychological warfare; military problems of the 
U.S.; military mobilization and demobilization; combat intelligence; military 
teaching methods; artillery tactics and technique ; leadership, drill and ex- 
ercise of command. 

Military Science 402. Second Year Advanced Military Training. Four 
hours. 

Prerequisite: Military Science 401. 

Artillery tactics and technique ; leadership, drill and exercise of command. 



150 EASTERN STATE COLLEGE 



MUSIC 

Before selecting the field of music for special or major con- 
centration, the student will consult with the head of the department. 
Because the training of a music teacher requires a better musical 
background, together with more knowledge and skill, than may be 
acquired during the normal four years of college, students who 
select music as a major should have had some pre-college music 
training and certain natural aptitudes. It is highly desirable that a 
student be fairly proficient pianist before coming to college. How- 
ever, proficiency on some other instrument may have an equivalent 
value. 

The requirements for ensemble participation are the same 
for all areas and majors in music, both professional and non- 
professional degrees. The student should, during his first semester 
in college, make plans with the head of the department for the 
proper satisfaction of this requirement. 

Students who are taking Applied Music for credit will be ex- 
pected to attend a specified number of recitals and concerts. Unless 
this condition is met, credit will not be given. In advance of per- 
forming publicly, students are expected to consult their teachers of 
Applied Music. 



MUSIC 

(Recommended curriculum for a major in the area of Music 
with right of teaching certificate) 

First Year 

First Semester Hours Second Semester Hours 

English 101 3 English 102 ._. 3 

History 141 3 History 142 3 

Music 112 2 Library Science 166 1 

Music 150 - 2 Music 112 .__. 2 

Music 180 - 2 Music 151 2 

Music 181 2 Music 182 2 

Music 191 2 Music 192 ..- 2 

Physical Education 110 i.^ Physical Education 110 i,^ 

Sociology 100 (Women) 1 Elective 2 

171/2 171/2 

Second Year 

English 211 3 English 212 3 

Music 122 2 Music 122 2 

Music 130 1 Music 131 1 

Music 171 3 Music 282 2 

Music 281 2 Music 292 2 

Music 291 2 Physical Education 110 V2 

Physical Education 110 V2 Science 110 or 112 3 

Science 109 or 111 3 Elective 3 

I61/2 I6I/2 



RICHMOND, KENTUCKY 



151 



Third Year 



Education 211 3 

Music 363 2 

Music 371 2 

Music 381 2 

Music, Applied Elective 2 

Physical Education 225 2 

Elective 3 



16 



Health 201 3 

Music 364 __ 2 

Music 372 - 2 

Music 382 2 

Music 383 2 

Music, Applied Elective 2 

Elective 3 



16 



Fourth Year 

Education 383 3 Education 364 6 

Music 366 - - _... 2 Education 463 10 

Music 380 2 

Electives r.. 9 



16 



16 



The sequence of applied music courses is suggestive only and is subject to 
modification upon recommendation by the head of the department, by reason 
of the background ability or major interest of the student. 

Music 363 and 364 may be offered in alternate years with 380 
and 366. 



MUSIC 

The following courses are recommended for an area in Music 
with right of teaching certificate: 



Hours 
Music 180, Elements of Music .— 2 
Music 181-182, Beginning 

Harmony I-II 4 

Music 191-192, Beginning Sight 

Singing and Ear Training I-II 4 
Music 281-282, Advanced 

Harmony I-II ._, 4 

Music 291-292, Advanced Sight 

Singing and Ear Training I-II.. A 
Music 380, Form and Analysis .. 2 

Music 383, Orchestration - 2 

Music 171, Enjoyment of Music. 3 



Hours 
Music 371-372, Music History I-II 4 

Music 363, Conducting 2 

Music 363, Grade Methods 

and Materials 2 

^Music 364, High School Music ... 2 

^Music 112, Piano 4 

Music 122, Voice 4 

Music, Applied Elective 4 

Music 150, 151, Band Instru- 
ment Class I-II .- 4 

Music 130-131, String Class I-II.. 2 
"Ensemble - 6-9 

59-62 



^ Students whose principal interest is in piano and who select the piano 
field of ensemble participation may substitute Music 361 (Teaching Repertory) 
and 364 (Teaching Piano in Classes) for Orchestration and for High School 
Music. If only one substitution is made, Orchestration will be the course to 
be dropped. 

- The student may find it necessary to take additional piano lessons in 
order to fulfill to the satisfaction of the faculty the requirements for the State 
Council of Higher Education that a student must have "enough piano to insure 
competency to play simple accompaniments and materials such as are found 
in the Golden Book." 

" See Ensemble requirements. 



152 



EASTERN STATE COLLEGE 



MUSIC 



The following courses are recommended for a major in Music 
with right of teaching certificate: 

Hours Hours 

Music 180, Elements of Music -. 2 Music 363, Grade Methods and 

Music 181-182, Beginning Materials 2 

Harmony I-II 4 =Music, Applied Elective 5 

Music 191-192, Beginning Sight =Music 130-131, String Class I-II.. 2 

Singing and Ear Training I-II 4 or 

Music 171, Enjoyment of Music. 3 =Music 150-151, Band Instrument 

iMusic 366, Conducting 2 Class I-II .- -- 4 

24-26 



The following courses are recommended for a major in Music 
without right of teaching certificate: 



Hours 
Music 180, Elements of Music .... 2 
Music 181-182, Beginning 

Harmony I-II 4 

Music 191-192, Beginning Sight 

Singing and Ear Training I-II- 4 



Hours 
Music 171, Enjoyment of Music. 3 
Music 371-372, History of 

Music I-II 4 

'Applied Music 8 

25 



Minor in Music 

A student may elect a minor in Music. Courses for the minor 
must be approved by the Head of the Department of Music. 



See Ensemble requirements. 

^ Students whose principal musical interest is in piano and who elect the 
piano field for their ensemble participation may substitute Teaching Repertory 
for Conducting. 

" Five hours, to be taken in one or more fields, upon recommendation of 
advisor. 

^ After consultation with student, the advisor will recommend Music 
130-131, or Music 150-151. 

■■ It is recommended that the 8 hours of applied music credit in this cur- 
riculum be distributed evenly throughout the 8 semesters. The credit shall 
be earned in a single field of applied music unless the teacher concerned and 
the head of the department recommend otherwise. 



RICHMOND, KENTUCKY 



153 



MUSIC 

The following courses are recommended for an area in Music 
without right of teaching certificate: 

Hours Hours 

Music 180, Elements of Music — . 2 Music 380, Form and Analysis .... 2 

Music 181-182, Beginning Music 171, Enjoyment of Music .. 3 

Harmony I-H 4 Music 371-372, History of 

Music 191-192, Beginning Sight Music I-H 4 

Singing and Ear Training I-II.. 4 Music 361 or 362, Teaching 

Music 281-282, Advanced Repertory (Piano or Voice) 1 

Harmony I-H 4 ^Music, Applied Elective 16 

Music 291-292, Advanced Sight Ensemble 6-9 

Singing and Ear Training I-II.. 4 

55-58 

Optional Fields of Ensemble Participation 

These requirements are the same for graduation with right of 
teaching certificate and without right of teaching certificate, both 
for the major and for the area. Every music major shall, upon 
consultation with his faculty advisor and with the head of the de- 
partment, select one of the following fields of ensemble participa- 
tion. Such participation must begin with the first semester of the 
freshman year unless other arrangements are approved by ad- 
visors. In order to discharge the requirements for ensemble partici- 
pation, only consecutive semesters shall be considered as constitut- 
ing a year. This statement represents only the minimum require- 
ment for music majors; more extensive participation is advised for 
the sake of the musical and professional growth of the individual. 
Except in Music 121 (Choir), credit in ensemble shall be given only 
for semesters which are consecutive. 

Voice Orchestra 

4 years Choir/Glee Club 1 year Choir 

*1 year Band/Orchestra 4 years Orchestra 

Piano Band 

2 years Choir 1 year Choir 

1 year Accompanying 5 years Band/Orchestra of which 

*1 year Band/Orchestra 4 years must be Band. 
1 year elective 

MUSIC FEES 

Class Instruction 

Music 130, 131, 151, 152 $ 5.00 

Individual Instruction 

Piano, Voice, Violin, Organ, Violoncello, "Wind 

Instruments 

Two lessons per week, one semester 27.00 

One lesson per week, one semester 18.00 

Practice room with piano, one hour daily, one semester.... 5.00 

Use of college-owned violin, one semester 3.00 

See Ensemble Requirements. 

''■ It is recommended that the sixteen hours be earned entirely in one field 
of applied music. Additional fields are optional. 

* To be taken immediately following Mus. 150 or 151. 



154 EASTERN STATE COLLEGE 

MUSIC 
LOWER DIVISION COURSES 

*Music 11. (Formerly Music la, b, c.) Piano. No credit. 

See music fees. 

Introductory course for the non-musician preparatory to Music 112. 

*lVIusic 12. (Formerly Music 2a, b, c.) Voice. No credit. 

See music fees. 

Introductory course for the non-musician preparatory to Music 122. 

*Music 13a. (Formerly Music 3a, b, c.) Violin. No credit. 

See music fees. 

An introductory course to prepare the student to enter Music 132. 

*Music 13b. (Formerly Music 4a, b, c.) Violoncello. No credit. 
See music fees. 

*Music 15. (Formerly Music 6a, b, c.) Wind Instruments. No credit. 
See music fees. 

Introductory course for those who wish to learn to play any of the wood- 
wind or brass instruments. 

*Music 112. (Formerly Music lla-0.) Piano. Two hours. 
See music fees. 

Two lessons per week, with approximately six hours of practice and study 
per week. 

Music 120. (Formerly Music 20.) Chorus. One hour. 

To encourage and foster a knowledge of and a desire to participate in 
choral singing; to teach part singing; to familiarize students with standard 
community and folk songs and with the more familiar choral works and 
simpler modern works for mixed chorus; to acquaint prospective teachers 
with desirable high school choral material; to illustrate ideals of choral sing- 
ing and methods of attaining them. 

Music 121. (Formerly Music 20a.) Choir. One hour. 

The College Choir is open to all college students who qualify. The 
organization aims to develop and perpetuate a high standard of choral-en- 
semble singing. Each year the Choir makes a number of appearances on the 
campus and before high schools and other organizations. It also assists in the 
rendering of the Messiah and other formal programs, and membership in the 
Choir will include attendance at rehearsals for these programs. 

*Music 122. (Formerly Music 12a-l.) Voice. Two hours. 
See music fees. 

Music 130 and 131. (Formerly Music 10a, b, c.) String Class. One hour. 

To provide for the beginner who wishes to learn to play a string instru- 
ment an opportunity to study under the stimulus of class instruction; to start 
the beginner on the road toward sufficient playing and technical ability to 
teach strings in class and to train the string section of a school orchestra. 

The first semester and part of the second are devoted to the study of one 
particular instrument. The second semester devotes some attention to the 
string instruments which are not studied in class. 

*Music 132. (Formerly Music 13a-l.) Violin. Two hours. 



See music fees. 

* Music 11, 12, 13a, 13b, 15, and the first four semesters of Music 112, 122, 
132, and 152 may be individual instruction or instruction in small groups, at 
the discretion of the instructor and the head of the department. 



RICHMOND, KENTUCKY 155 



*Music 136. (Formerly Music 14a-f.) Violoncello. Two hours. 
See music fees. 

*Music 142. (Formerly Music 15a-l.) Organ. Two hours. 
Prerequisite: Four years of piano study. 
See music fees. 

Music 150. (Formerly Music 16a.) Band Instrument Class I. Two hours. 
See music fees. 

A class in woodwind instruments, with some attention to percussion. 
Practical instruction in methods of tone production, tuning, fingering, and 
care of the instruments; group instruction, involving handling and playing of 
the woodwind instruments of the band and orchestra; the examination of 
materials suitable for beginning bands. This course will give the student some 
practical experience in elementary conducting. 

Music 151. (Formerly Music 16b.) Band Instrument Class II. Two hours. 
See music fees. 

A class in brass instruments, with some attention to percussion similar to 
Music 150. 

*Music 152. Wind Instrument. Two hours. 
See music fees. 

Music 171. (Formerly Music 27.) The Enjoyment of Music. Three hours. 

The most interesting music from all periods and styles. Besides the 
regular library of recorded music, there is available for this course the 
Carnegie Music Set, including reproducing machine and record library. Open 
to all students, with additional assignments to be asked of students majoring 
in music. 

Music 180. (Formerly Music 18.) Elements of Music. Two hours. 

Staff notation, notes, rests, clefs, scales, (various modes), keys, meter, 
chromatic tones, intervals, chords, cadences, abbreviations, and other symbols; 
music terms; elements of form; solmization; music writing and simple 
dictation. 

Music 181. (Formerly Music 28a.) Beginning Harmony I. Two hours. 

Four voice part writing based on primary triads; the dominant seventh 
melodic passing tones and embellishments; keyboard work consisting of scales, 
triads, etc. 

Music 182. (Formerly Music 28b-c.) Beginning Harmony II. Two hours. 

Prerequisite: Music 181. 

Continuation of first term harmony ; use of secondary triads and inversions 
in major and minor keys; harmonizations with figured bass and given soprano; 
original composition in simple forms; keyboard work with cadences and 
elementary harmonization; secondary chords of the seventh; modulation to 
nearly related keys; continuation of keyboard and original work. 

Music 191. (Formerly Music 29a.) Beginning Sight Singing and Ear 
Training I. Two hours. 

Sight singing of melodic exercises in major and minor keys and in various 
rhythms; tone group, and verbal and tonal dictation; interval drill. 



* Music 11, 12, 13a, 13b, 15, and the first four semesters of Music 112, 122, 
132, and 152 may be individual instruction or instruction in small groups, at 
the discretion of the instructor and the head of the department. 



156 EASTERN STATE COLLEGE 



Music 192. (Formerly Music 29b-c.) Beginning Sight Singing and Ear 
Training II. Two hours. 
Prerequisite : Music 191. 

*Music 210. Band. One-half hour. 

*Music 220. Orchestra. One-half hour. 

*Music 230. Girls' Glee Club. One-half hour, 

*Music 240. Men's Glee Club. One-half hour. 

Music 260. (Formerly Music 25a-b.) Public School Music. Three hours. 

Such knowledge of music theory and of the principles of notation as it is 
needed by the grade teacher; the aims of music in the grades; the child voice; 
tone quality; the unmusical singer; rythmic development; use of the pitch 
pipe; rote songs; use of the phonograph in teaching songs, together with in- 
creasing ability in music reading on the part of the student. 
r 

Music 281. (Formerly Music 38a.) Advanced Harmony I. Two hours. 

Prerequisite : Music 182. 

Extraneous modulation; secondary chords of the seventh; analysis of 
sonatas of Haydn and Mozart; study of melodic and harmonic development; 
chords of the Neopolitan sixth ; augmented sixth. 

Music 282. (Formerly Music 38b-c.) Advanced Harmony II. Two hours. 
Modulation through use of the diminished seventh chord; analysis and 
memorizing a Bach choral; writing a sonata, allegro form. 

Music 291. (Formerly 39a.) Advanced Sight Singing and Ear Training I. 
Two hours. 

Music 292. (Formerly Music 39b-c.) Advanced Sight Singing and Ear 
Training II. Two hours. 
Prerequisite: Music 291. 

UPPER DIVISION COURSES 

(Open to Junior, Senior, and Graduate Students) 

Music 361. Teaching Repertory, Piano. One hour. 

This course is designed to widen the student's acquaintance with piano 
literature, to give him a repertoire of teaching material, a knowledge of 
teaching procedures. A note book containing notes on methods of attacking 
technical problems, lists of teaching materials for various grades, etc., is 
required. 

Music 362. Teaching Repertory, Voice. One hour. 

This course is designed to widen the student's acquaintance with voice 
literature, to give him a repertoire of teaching material, and a knowledge of 
teaching procedures. A note book containing notes on methods of attacking 
technical problems, lists of teaching materials for various grades, etc., is 
required. 

Music 363. (Formerly Music 41a.) Grade Methods and Materials. Two 
hours. 

Prerequisites: Music 260 or 180 or the equivalent. 

A course in the teaching and supervision of music in the grades, designed 
primarily for music majors. 



* Consecutive semesters in this course will be required for credit; any two 
consecutive semesters will earn one hour of credit. Admission to membership 
upon approval of instructor. 



RICHMOND, KENTUCKY 157 



Music 364. (Formerly Music 41b.) High School Music. Two hours. 
A course in the teaching and administration of high school music, designed 
primarily for music majors. 

Music 366. (Formerly Music 42.) Conducting. Two hours. 

Prerequisites: Musical training and experience adequate to the compre- 
hension and manipulation of the subject matter of this course. 

Technique of the baton; tempo; attach; release; phrasing; dynamics; seat- 
ing of the chorus and orchestra; discipline of rehearsals; community music. 

Music 371. (Formerly Music 37a.) Music History I. Two hours. 

Archaic and medieval music; organization of church music; music of the 
Renaissance and Reformation; music of Elizabethan England; early classical 
composers; Bach, Handel, Haydn, and Mozart, the early Beethoven. 

This course and Music 372 are organized primarily for music majors. 
Because of the background required for this course, non-music majors will be 
admitted only upon recommendation of the head of the department. 

Music 372. (Formerly Music 37b-c.) Music History II. Two hours. 

Romanticism in music : the Romantic opera; development of piano music; 
the art song; late Romantic and national trends in music; modern music; 
Impressionism; atonality ; Beethoven; Schubert; Schumann; Chopin; Liszt; 
Wagner: Debussy: Ravel; Hindemith; Stravinsky; jazz influence in American 
music; Harris; Gershwin, etc. 

Music 380. Form and Analysis. Two hours. 

*Music 381. Counterpoint I. Two hours. 

*Music 382. Counterpoint II. Two hours. 

*Music 383. Orchestration. Two hours. 

Music 461. (Formerly Music 44a.) Band and Orchestra Procedures and 
Materials I. Two hours. 

Analysis and organization of various courses of study for instrumental 
groups of varying abilities; rehearsal routines; training student sectional 
leaders ; duties which may be assumed by students; adaptation of practice 
quarters to fit accoustical needs; program mechanics for public appearances; 
publicizing and interpreting music activities; care of equipment; program 
and teaching materials consideration of the modified Prescott system and 
similar courses of study. - 

Music 462. (Formerly Music 44b.) Band and Orchestra Procedures and 
Materials II. Two hours. 

Continuation of Music 461. 

Music 463. (Formerly Music 43a, b, c.) Teaching Piano in Classes. Two 
hours. 

Prerequisite : Three years of piano study in college or the equivalent. 

*Music 481. Canon and Fugue I. Two hours. 

*Music 482. Canon and Fugue II. Two hours. 

*Music 483. Composition. Two hours. 



* During semesters when Music 381, 382, 481, 482, 483 are not offered as 
regular classes they may be taken as individual instruction, under the same 
arrangements as instruction in Applied Music. 




HANGER STADIUM 



RICHMOND, KENTUCKY 159 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 
LOWER DIVISION COURSES 

Physical Education 110. (Formerly Physical Education 10.) Fundamental 
Physical Education Activities. One-half hour. Fee $.75 except as otherwise 
indicated. * 

To promote the development of physical efficiency and skills. The course 
is divided into sections as indicated below: 

Physical Education 110-a, Elementary Tumbling and Apparatus. 

Physical Education 110-b, Elementary Swimming. 

Physical Education 110-c, Fundamentals of Touch Football. 

Physical Education 110-d, Fundamentals of Basketball. 

Physical Education 110-e, Fundamentals of Softball. 

Physical Education 110-f, Fundamentals of Volleyball. 

Physical Education 110-g, Fundamentals of Tennis. 

Physical Education 110-h, Fundamentals of Handball. 

Physical Education 110-i, Fundamentals of Boxing and Wrestling. 

Physical Education 110-j, Fundamentals of Badminton and Aerial Dart. 

Physical Education 110-k, Fundamentals of Shuffleboard, Paddle Tennis, 
and Table Tennis. 

Physical Education 110-1, Folk Dancing and Singing Games. 

Physical Education 110-m, Clogging. 

Physical Education 110-n, Archery. 

Physical Education llO-r, Riding and Horsemanship. Fee $6.00. 

Physical Education 110-s, Hockey. 

Physical Education 125. (Formerly Physical Education 11.) Introduction 
to Physical Education. One hour. 

Place of physical education in general education and American life; con- 
sideration of comparative physical education. 

Physical Education 220. (Formerly Physical Education 20.) Plays and 
Games for the Elementary Grades. Two hours. 

Materials, methods and practice in physical education activities suitable 
for children in the elementary school. 

Physical Education 225. (Formerly Physical Education 21.) Games and 
Sports for the Secondary Sehool. Two hours. 

Physical education activities suitable for junior and senior high school 
students. 

Physical Education 250. (Formerly Physical Education 26.) Scouting and 
Clubcraft. (Men). Two hours. 

History and principles of scouting; practical scoutcraft and clubcraft. 
The scoutmaster's certificate is awarded to those completing the course. 
Fee, $.75. 

Physical Education 251. (Formerly Physical Education 25.) Clubcraft. 
(Women). Two hours. 

National girls' organizations such as Girl Scouts, Camp Fire Girls, Girl 
Reserves, and 4-H Clubs; leadership and organization of clubs. 



160 EASTERN STATE COLLEGE 



Physical Education 252. (Formerly Physical Education 27.) Softball and 
Tennis Coaching Fundamentals for Women. Two hours. 

Theory and practice of techniques and teaching procedures of Softball and 
tennis for women. Also lead -up games for these sports. 

Physical Education 261. (Formerly Physical Education 24 and 265.) 
Coaching Baseball. Two hours. 

Theory and practice in coaching the fundamentals of baseball; team 
offense and defense. 



UPPER DIVISION COURSES 

(Open to Junior, Senior, and Graduate Students) 

Physical Education 300. (Formerly Physical Education 30.) Folk ana 
National Dancing. One hour. 

Traditional and social dances of the United States and other countries. 

Physical Education 320. (Formerly Physical Education 31.) Kinesiology. 
Two hours. 

Fundamentals of body mechanics; movements of the human body. 

Physical Education 325. (Formerly Physical Education 32.) Physiology of 
Activity. Two hours. 

Effects of physical education activities on the various systems of the 
human body. 

Physical Education 345. (Formerly Physical Education 35a, 35b, and 245a, 
245b.) Modern Dance. One hour. 

Modern dance and the fundamentals of movement and rhythm; dance 
composition. 

Physical Education 360. (Formerly Physical Education 37 and 260.) 
Coaching Basketball. Two hours. 

Theory and practice in coaching the fundamentals of basketball; team 
offense and defense. 

Physical Education 361. (Formerly Physical Education 38.) Basketball 
and Volleyball Coaching for Women. Two hours. 

Theory and practice of techniques and teaching procedures of basketball 
and volleyball for women; lead-up games for these sports. 

Physical Education 362. (Formerly Physical Education 39 and 265.) 
Coaching Track and Field. Two hours. 

Theory and practice in coaching fundamentals involved in track and field. 

Physical Education 366. (Formerly Physical Education 36.) Materials and 
Methods for Teaching Physical Education. One hour. 

Theories of play; study of existing play programs; correlation with other 
subjects; games, skills, lesson planning and observation. 

Physical Education 367. (Formerly Physical Education 34.) Advanced 
Physical Training Activities. One hour. 

Prerequisite: Physical Education 110a. 

Advanced tactics ; drills for demonstrations; pyramid building; tumbling; 
apparatus; opportunity for leadership and observation. Fee, $.75. 



RICHMOND, KENTUCKY 161 



Physical Education 401. (Formerly Physical Education 40.) Community 
Recreation. Two hours. 

The problems of leisure; vacation time for children; adult recreation; 
content of school programs for leisure education; physical education; 
dramatics; reading; music, art and handcrafts; nature study; extracurricular 
activities. 

Physical Education 420. (Formerly Physical Education 42 and 260.) 
Coaching Football. Two hours. 

Theory and practice in coaching the fundamentals of football; team 
offense and defense. 

Physical Education 468. (Formerly Physical Education 46.) Administra- 
tion and Organization of Physical Education. Two hours. 

Policies and procedures of administration on the elementary and second- 
ary school level. Special emphasis on construction and care of facilities, 
equipment, and supervision of personnel. 

PHYSICS 

(Recommended curriculum for the training of teachers of the 
Sciences with right of teaching certificate) 

First Year 

First Semester Hours Second Semester Hours 

Biology 121 _.. 5 Biology 122 5 

Chemistry 111 5 Chemistry 112 5 

English 101 3 EngUsh 102 .__ 3 

Mathematics 107 3 Library Science 166 1 

Physical Education 110 Va Mathematics 113 3 

Sociology 100 (Women) 1 Physical Education 110 Vs 

17 1/2 171/2 

Second Year 

Biology 229 3 Biology 325 3 

English 211 3 English 212 3 

History 141 or 202 3 History 142 or 203 3 

Physical Education 110 V2 Physical Education 110 Vz 

Physics 201 5 Physics 202 5 

Elective -- 3 Elective - 2 

171/2 I6I/2 

Third Year 

Biology 335 -— 2 Biology 345 .._- 2 

Chemistry 310 5 Chemistry 212 5 

Geology 201 3 Education 211 3 

Physics Elective 3 Physics Elective 3 

Science 471 - 2 Science 410 - 2 

Elective -- 2 Elective 2 

17 17 

Fourth Year 

Health 201 3 Education 364 6 

Physical Education 225 2 Education 463 10 

Physics Elective 3 

Elective - 9 

17" 16~" 



Physics must be chosen by the student with the approval of the head of 
the department. Physics 131, 132, and 203 may be substituted for Physics 201 
and 202. 



162 EASTERN STATE COLLEGE 



PHYSICS 

(Recommended curriculum for a major in Physics with right of 
teaching certificate) 

First Year 

First Semester Hours Second Semester Hours 

Chemistry 111 5 Chemistry 112 5 

English 101 __. 3 English 102 .__. 3 

Mathematics 107 3 Library Science 166 1 

Physical Education 110 1/2 Mathematics 113 3 

Sociology 100 (Women) 1 Mathematics 108 2 

Elective 4 Physical Education 110 V2 

Elective - 2 

161/2 I61/2 

Second Year 

English 211 3 English 212 3 

Mathematics 232 3 Health 201 3 

Physical Education 110 1/2 Mathematics 251 5 

Physical Education 225 2 Physical Education 110 Vz 

Physics 107 .__. 1 Physics 202 5 

Physics 201 5 

Elective 2 



I61/2 I61/2 

Third Year 

Biology 121 5 Biology 122 _„ 5 

Education 211 3 Education 383 3 

Mathematics 352 3 Physics Elective 6 

Physics Elective 3 Elective 2 

Elective _... 2 

16 f 16 

Fourth Year 

Physics Elective 6 Education 364 6 

Elective „ _. _10 Education 463 10 

16 16 

Recommended Curriculum for a Minor in Physics 

A student with a major and a minor in other departments may 
take the follow courses for a minor in Physics: Physics 107, 201, 
202, and 7 hours elective. 



Physics electives must be chosen by the student with the approval of the 
head of the department. Physics 131, 132, and 203 may be substituted for 
Physics 201 and 202. 



RICHMOND, KENTUCKY 163 



PHYSICS 

(Recommended curriculum for a major in Physics without right 
of teaching certificate) 

First Year 

First Semester Hours Second Semester Hours 

Chemistry 111 — 5 Chemistry 112 — _. 5 

English 101 3 English 102 — 3 

History 141 _. 3 History 142 3 

Mathematics 107 3 Library Science 166 1 

Physical Education 110 1/2 Mathematics 108 2 

Physics 107 1 Mathematics 113 3 

Sociology 100 (Women) 1 Physical Education 110 V2 

I6V2 171/2 

Second Year 

English 211 3 English 212 3 

Mathematics 232 3 Mathematics 251 5 

Physical Education 110 1/2 Physical Education 110 V2 

Physics 201 _.. 5 Physics 202 5 

Elective — 5 Elective 3 

I6V2 I61/2 

Third Year 

Biology 121 5 Biology 122 5 

Foreign Language 3 Foreign Language 3 

Mathematics 352 3 Physics Elective 6 

Physics Elective 3 Elective 2 

Elective 2 

16 16 

Fourth Year 

Physics Elective _ 6 Physics Elective 3 

Elective 10 Elective _ 13 

16 16 



PHYSICS 
LOWER DIVISION COURSES 

Physics 107. (Formerly Physics 17.) Slide Rule Theory and Practice. 
One hour. 

Designed to aid the student in doing arithmetical computations easily and 
rapidly. 

Physics 131. (Replaces Physics 11.) Elementary Physics. Five hours. 
Prerequisite: One unit each of high school algebra and plane geometry. 
The fundamental ideas of mechanics; molecular physics; heat. Three 
lecture and four laboratory hours. Fee, $1.50. 

Physics 132. (Replaces Physics 12.) Elementary Physics. Five hours. 
Prerequisite: Physics 131. 

Electricity; magnetism; wave motion; sound; light. Three lecture and 
four laboratory hours. Fee, $1.50. » 



164 EASTERN STATE COLLEGE 



Physics 201. (Formerly Physics 20 and part of Physics 21.) Mechanics, 
Molecular Physics and Heat. Five hours. 

Prerequisite : Trigonometry. 

Falling bodies ; Newton's laws of motion and applications to practical 
problems; curvilinear motion; composition and resolution of forces; the laws 
of equilibrium and their application to various problems; work and energy; 
machines; momentum; elasticity; simple harmonic motion; hydrodynamics; 
heat and molecular physics including thermometry, pressure, expansion of 
solids, liquids, and gases ; modern radiation theory. Three lecture and four 
laboratory hours. Fee, $1.50. 

Physics 202. (Formerly Physics 22 and part of Physics 21.) Electricity, 
Magnetism, Wave Motion, Sound, and Light. Five hours. 

Prerequisite: Physics 201. 

Electrostatics; the nature of electricity; magnetism; Ohm's law; measure- 
ment of electrical qu^fitities; sources of electrical energy; Lenz's law; in- 
ductance and capacity; alternating currents; electric waves and radio. Three 
lecture and four laboratory hours. Fee, $1.50. 

Physics 203. (Formerly Physics 23.) Problems in General Physics. Three 
hours. 

Prerequisites: Physics 201, 202, or equivalent. 

Problems selected from topics in Physics 201 and 202. Three recitation 
hours. 



UPPER DIVISION COURSES 

(Open to Junior, Senior, and Graduate Students) 

Physics 300. (Formerly Physics 30.) Modern Physics. Three hours. 

Prerequisites: Physics 201, Physics 202 or equivalent. Mathematics 251 or 
registration in Mathematics 251. 

Historical introduction; alternating currents ; electromagnetic theory of 
radiation; properties of moving charged bodies; the electron; kinetic theory 
of gases; thermionics; the photoelectric effect; x-rays and their applications. 
Three recitation hours. 

Physics 301. (Formerly Physics 31.) Modern Physics. Three hours. 

Prerequisite: Physics 300. 

Bohr theory of spectra; periodic law and atomic structure; critical 
potentials; radio and television; radioactivity and isotopes; geophysics; 
astrophysics; relativity; specific heats; electrical resistance; high frequency 
sound waves; and recent development in physics. Three recitation hours. 

Physics 302. (Formerly Physics 32.) Introduction to Physical Optics. 
Three hours. 

Prerequisites: Physics 201 and 202, or equivalent. 

Wave motion; reflection and refraction; further study of lenses; the tele- 
scope; dispersion; facts concerning the spectrum; interference; diffraction; 
plane polarized light; the electromagnetic theory of light; the quantum 
theory; origin of spectra. Three recitation hours. 

Physics 303. (Formerly Physics 33.) Heat. Three hours. 

Prerequisites : Physics 201 and 202, or equivalent. 

Historical review of theories and discoveries; thermometry; specific 
heats; thermal expansion; transfer of heat; first law of thermodynamics; 
radiation; change of state; continuity of state; introduction to thermody- 
namics; production of low temperatures; production of high temperatures. 
Three recitation hours. 



RICHMOND, KENTUCKY 165 



Physics 304. (Formerly Physics 34.) Advanced Electricity and Magnetism. 
Three hours. 

Prerequisites: Physics 201 and 202, or equivalent, and Mathematics 251. 
Magnetism; the electric current; electrostatics; electrolysis; thermoelectricity; 
electromagnetics; alternating currents; electromagnetic radiation; conduction 
in gases ; electrons and atoms. Three recitation hours. 

Physics 307. (Formerly Physics 36.) Electronics. Three hours. 

Prerequisite : Physics 202 or equivalent. 

Theory of thermionic tubes; amplifier circuit principles; photosensitive 
devices; rectifiers; principles of radio, radar and television. Three recitation 
hours. Fee, $1.50. 

Physics 310. Special Problems in Physics. One to three hours. 

Prerequisite: Physics 202 or equivalent. 

Working out of special laboratory experiments ; development of new 
equipment; or solution of special mathematical problems related to physics. 

Physics 311. Special Problems in Physics. One to three hours. 
This course is a continuation of Physics 310. 

Physics 455. (Formerly Physics 301, also listed now as Mathematics 455.) 
Theoretical Mechanics. Three hours. 

May be taken either in the Mathematics or Physics Department. 

Prerequisites: Mathematics 352 or registration in Mathematics 352, and 
Physics 201 or 202. 

Elemental concepts of mechanics : rectilinear motion of a particle; 
curvilinear motion ; particle dynamics from the point of view of energy; 
statics of a particle; statics of a rigid body; dynamics of a rigid body; con- 
strained motion; oscillations; motion of aggregates of particles; deformable 
bodies and wave motion; mechanics of fluids. 

PSYCHOLOGY 

Psychology 211. General Psychology. Three hours. 

Preview of psychology; factors in development; motivation; emotions; 
learning; the management of learning: thinking; personality and individual 
differences; intelligence; vocational and employment psychology; getting 
along with people; psychology and social problems. 




ROARK SCIENCE BUILDING 



RICHMOND, KENTUCKY 167 

NONSPECIALIZED SCIENCE 
LOWER DIVISION COURSES 

Science 109. (Formerly Science 12 and 110.) Physical Science I. Three 
hours. 

Non-mathematical treatment of general principles of mechanics, 
gravitation, heat, electricity, magnetism, wave motion, sound, light, astro- 
physics and astronomy, and atomic physics. Two lecture and two laboratory 
hours. Fee, $1.00. 

Science 110. (Formerly Science 11 and 110.) Physical Science II. Three 
hours. 

Molecular and atomic structure of matter; elements and compounds; 
acids, bases and salts; types of reactions; preparation and manufacture of 
substances; mineral identification; surface features of the earth; structure 
of the earth. Two lecture and two laboratory hours. Fee, $1.00. 

Science 111. (Formerly Science 11 and Biology 14a.) Biological Science I. 
Three hours. 

A general education course. The principles of biology as they apply to 
man; the maintenance, adaptation and perpetuation of his body; the history 
and development of man and his races; interrelationships of man and other 
organisms; effect of man and other organisms on community life. Two 
lecture and two laboratory hours. Fee, $1.00. 

Science 112. (Formerly Biology 14b.) Biological Science II. Three hours. 
Prerequisite: Science 111. 

A continuation of Science 111. Two lecture and two labor^ry hours. 
Fee, $1.00. 

Science 261. (Formerly Biology 26.) Nature Study I. Two hours. 

Prerequisite: A major in elementary education. 

Methods in teaching nature study and general science in grades one to 
six; the fundamental life processes, identification and economic importance 
of the common animal and plant life ; studies of the earth and sky, including 
soil, rocks, weather, clouds, stars, constellations and physical phenomena; 
conservation. Four laboratory hours. Fee, $1.00. 

Science 262. (Formerly Biology 26.) Nature Study II. Two hours. 

Prerequisite: Science 261. 

A continuation of Science 261. Four laboratory hours. Fee, $1.00. 

UPPER DIVISION COURSES 

(Open to Junior, Senior, and Graduate Students) 

Science 310. (Formerly Science 35.) History of Science. Three hours. 

The development of scientific concepts through the ages; contribution of 
science to civilization; relations of scientific developments and various 
philosophies ; biographical sketches. Three lecture hours. 

Science 410. Teaching of Physical Science in the High School. Two 
hours. 

Prerequisite: A major in Physical Science. 

Selection of textbooks, workbooks, manuals, etc.; organization of 
laboratory space and purchasing of materials and equipment; making simple 
equipment; securing free and inexpensive materials; preparation and 



168 EASTERN STATE COLLEGE 



presentation of work units; visual aids; demonstrations; test construction and 
administration; club-work; specimen collection and preservation; observation 
in Model High School. Two lecture hours. 

Science 471. (Formerly Biology 51.) Methods in Biology. Two hours. 

Prerequisite: A major or minor in Biology. 

Required of applicants for student teaching in Biology. 

The sources, preparation, culture and use of biological materials for 
instruction in high schools ; the construction, care and use of high school 
biological equipment; conduction of field trips. Four laboratory hours. 



GENERAL SOCIAL SCIENCE 

Social Science 100. An Introduction to the Social Sciences. Three hours. 

A consideration of contemporary social problems. 

Social Science 101. An Introduction to the Social Sciences. Three hours. 
A continuation of Social Science 100. 



SOCIOLOGY 
LOWER DIVISION COURSES 

Sociology 100. (Formerly Sociology 10.) College Orientation. One hour. 

The college and its functions; living in college; the development of 
efficient study habits; personal and family responsibilities; social relationships; 
vocational guidance. 

Sociology 200. (Formerly Sociology 20.) Social Understanding. Three 
hours. 

The meaning of "social understandings"; the community and the com- 
munity process ; community surveys ; the study of specific social problems, 
groups, and institutions as they relate to the community process. 

UPPER DIVISION COURSES 

(Open to Junior, Senior, and Graduate Students) 

Sociology 331. (Formerly Sociology 30.) Principles of Sociology. Three 
hours. 

Field of sociology and its relation to other social science courses; relation 
of Uving conditions to life; the problem of finding and using leaders; social 
achievements; man's relation to his institutions and his responsibility for 
them; the farriily; religion; and morals. 

Sociology 332. (Formerly Sociology 31.) Current Social Problems. Three 
hours. 

The social and institutional impact of industrialism and secularism; 
economic, social, and biological problems in modern society; social wreckage. 

Sociology 333. (Formerly Sociology 33.) Criminology, Penology and 
Reform. Three hours. 

Causes of crime; heredity and environment; costs of crime; punishment 
and correction of criminals; special attention to juvenile delinquents and 
correctional methods. 



RICHMOND, KENTUCKY 169 



SPANISH 

A student with a major and a minor in other departments may 
take 18 semester hours for a minor in Spanish. 

LOWER DIVISION COURSES 

Spanish 101. (Formerly Spanish 11.) Elementary Spanish. Three hours. 

Grammar; pronunciation; reading of easy Spanish. 

Spanish 102. (Formerly Spanish 12.) Elementary Spanish. Three hours. 
Prerequisite : Spanish 101 or one unit of high school Spanish. 
A continuation of Spanish 101. 

Spanish 201. (Formerly Spanish 21.) Intermediate Spanish. Three hours. 
Prerequisites : Spanish 101 and 102, or two units of high school Spanish. 
Review of grammar; intensive work on studies of Spanish speaking 
countries as a basis for spoken Spanish. 

Spanish 202. (Formerly Spanish 22.) Intermediate Spanish. Three hours. 
Prerequisite : Spanish 201 or three units of high school Spanish. 
Foundation work for advanced study in literature and intensive study of 
spoken Spanish. 

UPER DIVISION COURSES 

(Open to Junior, Senior ,and Graduate Students) 

Spanish 301. (Formerly Spanish 31.) The Spanish Novel. Three hours. 
Prerequisite: Two years of college Spanish or the equivalent. 
Reading of selected novels of the Golden Age and of the eighteenth 
century. 

Spanish 302. (Formerly Spanish 32.) The Spanish Novel. Three hours. 
Prerequisite: Spanish 301 or its equivalent. 
Novels of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. 

Spanish 401. (Formerly Spanish 41.) Spanish Poetry. Three hours. 

Prerequisite: Two years of college Spanish or the equivalent. 
Selected poems by writers throughout the world using the Spanish 
medium. 

Spanish 402. (Formerly Spanish 42.) Spanish Drama. Three hours. 
Prerequisite : Spanish 401 or its equivalent. 
Representative plays of the various schools of drama. 



INDEX 



Page 

Administrative Officers 10 

Administrative Staff 20 

Admission, Graduate _ 67 

Admission, Undergraduate 48 

Advanced Standing 48 

Agriculture 72 

Alumni Association 45 

Art - 78 

Assembly _ 43 

Athletics 41 

Awards 43 

Baccalaureate Degrees 56 

Band 44 

Biology 82 

Board of Regents 9 

Board _ 54 

Book Store 39 

Buildings and Facilities 31-35 

Bureau of Appointments _ 46 

Cafeteria 39 

Calendar 5 

Campus 31 

Certificates 56-61 

Chemistry - 87 

Choir 44 

Classification of Students 50 

Cluhs 44 

Commencement _ 45 

Commerce 92 

Committees, Faculty 22 

Correspondence Courses _ 45 

Counseling 41 

Courses of Instruction 71-169 

Course Load 51 

Course Numbers 50 

Curricula, Pre-Professional 63 

Curricula, Teacher Education.. 56 

Degrees _ 56 

Departmental Clubs 44 

Division Chairmen 21 

Dormitories 37 

Dramatics 44 

Education, Courses in 100 

EmplojTnent, Student 42 

English — 108 

Entrance Requirements 48 

Examinations, Special 54 

Executive Committee 9 

Expenses and Fees 53 

Extension Division 45 

Faculty 11-19 

Faculty, Committees 22 

Faculty, Organization 21 



Fees and Expenses 

Fine Arts Series 

French _ 

Geography and Geology 

German 

Government „ 

Grading System _ 

Graduate Division 

Graduation Requirements 

Guidance and Personnel 

Health, Courses in 

Health Services 

History of the College 

History, Courses in 

Home Economics 

Honorary Societies 

Housing, Accommodations _ 

Industrial Arts 

Information, General 

Laboratory Fees 

Latin 

Library Staff _ , 

Library Science 

Living Accommodations 

Loan Funds 

Location of College 

Majors and Minors 

Master of Arts Degree 

Mathematics and Astronomy .... 

Medical Examinations 

Medical Technology 

Military Science and Tactics.... 

Music __ 

Non-Residence Fees 

Numbering of Courses 

Officers of Administration 

Officers of Board of Regents .. 

Orchestra __ 

Organizations, Student 

Personnel Services 

Physical Education 

Physics 

Placement Bureau 

Post Office 

Pre-Dental Curriculum 

Pre-Engineering Curriculum . 

Pre-Law Curriculum 

Pre-Medical Curriculum 

Probation 

Psychology 

Publications 

Purpose of College 

Quality Points 



Page 

53 

43 

115 

116 

120 

121 

50 

67 

52 

41 

122 

39 

27 

125 

131 

45 

37 

135 

27 

53 

140 

19 

141 

37 

42 

27 

59 

56 

142 

39 

65 

147 

150 

53 

50 

10 

9 

44 

44 

41 

159 

161 

46 

39 

64 

65 

65 

64 

51 

165 

45 

28 

51 



INDEX— Continued 



Page 

Regents, Board of 9 

Religious Activities 44 

Residence Halls 37 

Residence Requirements 52 

R.O.T.C. Staff - 19 

Schedule Changes 51 

Scholarships and Awards 43 

Scholastic Average - 51 

Science, Non-Specialized 167 

Semester System 27 

Social Science 168 

Social Work 65 

Sociology - 168 



Page 

Spanish 169 

Standard of Work 51 

Student Employment 42 

Student Load „ 51 

Student Organizations 44 

Summer Session 27 

Training Schools 61 

Transcripts of Credits 54 

Veterans, Admission 48 

Veterans, Housing 35 

Withdrawal, from the College 51 

Withdrawal, from Courses 51 




V i 



IS